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Search results for Ensuring network interfaces remain named consistently

Debian

Little-known APT utilities for Debian desktop users

Post date: July 30, 2006, 18:07 Category: Desktop Views: 3319 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Advanced Packaging Tool (APT) is a distinguishing feature of Debian-based systems. APT was the first major alternative in GNU/Linux to boast automatic dependency resolution. Most GNU/Linux users know it through the apt-get command, a utility that calls on the lower-level dpkg command. However, other APT-based utilities remain largely unknown to desktop users. Some of these utilities offer a range of functionality far beyond those of the basic tools.
Debian

PostgreSQL Database Server Configuration in Debian

Post date: March 24, 2006, 17:03 Category: Software Views: 2948 Comments
Tutorial quote: PostgreSQL is a fully featured object-relational database management system. It supports a large part of the SQL standard and is designed to be extensible by users in many aspects. Some of the features are: ACID transactions, foreign keys, views, sequences, subqueries, triggers, user-defined types and functions, outer joins, multiversion concurrency control. Graphical user interfaces and bindings for many programming languages are available as well.
Linux

Linux Directory Structure

Post date: December 26, 2007, 15:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 5344 Comments
Tutorial quote: The directory structure of Linux/other Unix-like systems is very intimidating for the new user, especially if he/she is migrating from Windows. In Windows, almost all programs install their files (all files) in the directory named: `Program Files.’ Such is not the case in Linux. The directory system categorises all installed files. All configuration files are in /etc, all binary files are in /bin or /usr/bin or /usr/local/bin. Here is the entire directory structure along with what they contain.
Linux

Cutting the tcp/ip network connection with cutter

Post date: December 13, 2005, 03:12 Category: Network Views: 3662 Comments
Tutorial quote: Recently I came across very powerful and nifty tool (used by one of our Sr. network admin). Just imagine that people in your private network using peer to peer software such as Kazaa, iMesh or others and you want to cut them or just want to cut all ftp connection over my firewall but not all traffic to host.
FreeBSD

Build your own gateway firewall

Post date: April 11, 2006, 21:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 5827 Comments
Tutorial quote: Learn how to build your own gateway firewall using FreeBSD and old PC parts. The firewall will consist of the PF firewall, Snort IDS, various IPS applications, Squid proxy, and some intuitive web interfaces for auditing. The cost of this project should be between free and $200 depending on your resourcefulness. I built mine for free using spare parts that were stockpiled in personal storage and parts that the USMC was throwing away, but you can build one from used and/or new parts for dirt cheap.
SGI

Installing IRIX 6.5 Across a Network

Post date: May 21, 2005, 10:05 Category: Installing Views: 7079 Comments
Tutorial quote: Installing across a network may be desirable for a number of reasons, usually speed, convenience (disks/CDROM attached to remote system) or necessity. I've done network installs on O2s, Octanes and Indys; in each case, a remote disk file system contained local copies of all the relevant 6.5 media.
Unix+clones

Command your network with Kaboodle

Post date: June 28, 2005, 09:06 Category: Network Views: 3946 Comments
Tutorial quote: Quite often setting up a local network is much easier than managing it. Even technically challenged users can figure out how to connect a couple of computers and a printer. However, tasks like maintenance, troubleshooting, and remote secure connections require more than just "which-cable-goes-where" knowledge. You need something like Kaboodle, a nifty tool that can help you to manage your local network like a pro.

Kaboodle allows you to visualize your local network, control computers on it via VNC, and connect to other Kaboodle-enabled networks. Kaboodle was developed for Windows, but according to its Web site, it will happily run under Wine on Linux and FreeBSD.
Ubuntu

Anonymous BitTorrent Using ItsHidden VPN

Post date: July 28, 2009, 18:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 5172 Comments
Tutorial quote: With anti-piracy outfits warning those who share copyrighted content and ISPs threatening to pull the plug on alleged offenders, many file-sharers have decided to protect themselves by going anonymous. To accommodate this growing demand, ItsHidden is now offering a free VPN targeted at those who want to protect their privacy online. Named ItsHidden, the free VPN solution has opened up a BETA test to the public, who can now privatize their Internet traffic - including BitTorrent transfers - in next to no time. ItsHidden was set up with torrent users in mind, allowing them to hide their identities from ‘third parties’ who choose to snoop on their activities.
Debian

How to Create an adhoc host with Ubuntu

Post date: March 2, 2009, 07:03 Category: System Views: 4944 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you ever needed to wirelessly network a Windows PC’s directly to a Ubuntu machine? In other words, you lack a router, switch, or other networking mechanism, each PC has a wireless device and you need to trade a file or play a network game? Read on.Ubuntu’s NetworkManager 0.7.0 contains the necessary features for creating an Ubuntu adhoc network host.

Linux

Port Knocking

Post date: April 16, 2005, 10:04 Category: Network Views: 3688 Comments
Tutorial quote: Firewall administrators are challenged to balance flexibility and security when designing a comprehensive rule set. A firewall should provide protection against malfeasants, while allowing trusted users to connect. Unfortunately, it is not always possible to filter out the bad guys, because filtering on the basis of IP addresses and ports does not distinguish connecting users. Bad guys can and do come from trusted IP addresses. Open ports remain a necessary vulnerability: they allow connections to applications but also may turn into open doors for attack. This article presents a new security system, termed port knocking, in which trusted users manipulate firewall rules by transmitting information across closed ports.
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