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Search results for Entering A Safe Mirror When Logging In With Unionfs And Chroot

Linux

Entering A Safe Mirror When Logging In With Unionfs And Chroot

Post date: June 28, 2007, 00:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2616 Comments
Tutorial quote: When reading a hint on the website of LinuxFromScratch I discovered the special capabilities of unionfs, specially in combination with chroot. Later I read a HowTo on a wikiwebsite of Gentoo, about entering a chrooted home directory when using a special script as shell. Combining these two brings me to using a chrooted environment, which you enter when logging in as a special user. This environment is an exact copy (mirror) of the system you are working on. Because you are in safe copy of the real system, you can do whatever you like, it will never change the system, everything stays inside the cache (the readwrite branch).
Debian

Bind chroot howto

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: Security Views: 2601 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install the DNS server Bind on Debian so that it runs out of a chroot jail for security reasons.
Ubuntu

Snare and Splunk…full logging for everyone (Logs, manage them well on Ubuntu)

Post date: April 10, 2007, 05:04 Category: Security Views: 5309 Comments
Tutorial quote: How to set up splunk on a Ubuntu server and centralize all your logging needs with a very powerfull search engine...very nifty stuff.
Debian

How To Create A Local Debian/Ubuntu Mirror With apt-mirror

Post date: January 4, 2007, 20:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3398 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to create a Debian/Ubuntu mirror for your local network with the tool apt-mirror. Having a local Debian/Ubuntu mirror is good if you have to install multiple systems in your local network because then all needed packages can be downloaded over the fast LAN connection, thus saving your internet bandwidth.
Linux

Chrooting Apache

Post date: April 13, 2005, 00:04 Category: Security Views: 2733 Comments
Tutorial quote: The chroot daemon allows you to run a program and have it see a given directory as the root (/) directory. This effectively locks the process into its very own filesystem ("chroot jail") isolated from the real / filesystem. In this article we will look at how to install the Apache Web server in such an environment.
Ubuntu

Creating Backups With luckyBackup On An Ubuntu 9.04 Desktop

Post date: August 20, 2009, 11:08 Category: Desktop Views: 2460 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how to install and use luckyBackup on an Ubuntu 9.04 desktop. luckyBackup is an application for data back-up and synchronization powered by the rsync tool. It is simple to use, fast (transfers over only changes made and not all data), safe (keeps your data safe by checking all declared directories before proceeding in any data manipulation ), reliable and fully customizable.
CentOS

Settings up a SFTP Only Chroot Jail

Post date: December 13, 2007, 22:12 Category: Security Views: 7843 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes how to set up a chroot jail (SFTP only) to allow your users to ONLY use sftp (no ssh/bash/…), and keep them stuck inside their own home directory. This tutorial is known to work on many other distributions as well as CentOS.
CentOS

Chroot jail SFTP only OpenSSH 5.x

Post date: May 5, 2008, 00:05 Category: Security Views: 9832 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes how to set up a chroot jail (SFTP only) to allow your users to ONLY use sftp (no ssh/bash/), and keep them stuck inside their own home directory. This tutorial is known to work on many other distributions as well as CentOS.
This tutorial is for the 4.9-5.x updates of OpenSSH
Linux

Creating a safe directory with PAM and Encfs

Post date: June 7, 2006, 20:06 Category: Security Views: 3173 Comments
Tutorial quote: Now, in my network (and others) the credentials provided at login could (and should) be used by those programs. How can you retrieve these credentials, providing enough security?
With a the PAM modules pam_script it's possible to store the password in a file, which will be used by fusemb and mount.cifs to read the password from.

To achieve security, one could make the user logging in owner and deny read/write for anybody else. Remove this file when the user ends his/her session.
This is enough, for runtime. But I was wondering, but what if the system crashes, and the file with the credentials remains on the harddrive? Anybody who is able to mount this harddrive with for example a lifecd, can read this file!

That's why I was looking for a way to encrypt this file.

With encfs this is very possible! At run time it gives an interface to encrypted files and directories, which does only exist at runtime! When the system is not running, there are only encrypted files, useless when you do not know the key to it. And this key is exactly the (encrypted) password! That's why I've chosen for a combination of PAM and Encfs.
Linux

Filesystem snapshots with unionfs

Post date: July 2, 2005, 01:07 Category: System Views: 2853 Comments
Tutorial quote: Many times, you need to know how a certain filesystem looked like at some point in time, and you want to be able to roll back changes that happened to it after that point. While there are multiple solutions to achieve this goal, certainly one of them is to use filesystem snapshots.
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