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Debian

Ethernet Bonding Configuration in Debian

Post date: April 24, 2006, 19:04 Category: Network Views: 3760 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ethernet bonding refers to aggregating multiple ethernet channels together to form a single channel. This is primarily used for redundancy in ethernet paths or for load balancing. This page refers in particular to performing ethernet bonding under linux, and so does not limit itself to discussion of 802.3ad Trunk Aggregation.
CentOS

Network Card Bonding On CentOS

Post date: July 5, 2007, 00:07 Category: Network Views: 5935 Comments
Tutorial quote: Bonding is the same as port trunking. In the following I will use the word bonding because practically we will bond interfaces as one. Bonding allows you to aggregate multiple ports into a single group, effectively combining the bandwidth into a single connection. Bonding also allows you to create multi-gigabit pipes to transport traffic through the highest traffic areas of your network. For example, you can aggregate three megabits ports into a three-megabits trunk port. That is equivalent with having one interface with three megabytes speed.
Ubuntu

How to Set up Network Bonding in Ubuntu 6.10

Post date: February 16, 2007, 22:02 Category: Network Views: 5576 Comments
Tutorial quote: Network Bonding, otherwise known as port trunking allows you to combine multiple network ports into a single group, effectively aggregating the bandwidth of multiple interfaces into a single connection. For example, you can aggregate two gigabyte ports into a two-gigabyte trunk port. Bonding is used primarily to provide network load balancing and fault tolerance.
Debian

Using ATA Over Ethernet On Debian Etch

Post date: October 17, 2007, 11:10 Category: Hardware Views: 6056 Comments
Tutorial quote: Imagine you have a machine with all of its disk full and another with unused gigabytes, and you do not want to move the data from one to the other. Why not use the second's disk on the first, you could do it with iSCSI, but you can do it with ATA over Ethernet (AoE) as well. It is the second method I will explain in this article. All of this was made with two computers running Debian Etch.
Debian

Using ATA Over Ethernet (AoE) On Debian Lenny (Initiator And Target)

Post date: March 15, 2009, 12:03 Category: Installing Views: 3452 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an AoE target and an AoE initiator (client), both running Debian Lenny. AoE stands for "ATA over Ethernet" and is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows AoE initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) AoE target using normal ethernet cabling. "Remote" in this case means "inside the same LAN" because AoE is not routable outside a LAN (this is a major difference compared to iSCSI). To the AoE initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
Fedora

Using ATA Over Ethernet (AoE) On Fedora 10 (Initiator And Target)

Post date: June 2, 2009, 10:06 Category: Installing Views: 3395 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an AoE target and an AoE initiator (client), both running Fedora 10. AoE stands for "ATA over Ethernet" and is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows AoE initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) AoE target using normal ethernet cabling. "Remote" in this case means "inside the same LAN" because AoE is not routable outside a LAN (this is a major difference compared to iSCSI). To the AoE initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
FreeBSD

ethernet naming convention in FreeBSD

Post date: May 31, 2007, 04:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 5063 Comments
Tutorial quote: Little explanation on how ethernet naming convention work in FreeBSD
Debian

Complete Debian Linux Server Setup Guide

Post date: March 15, 2006, 00:03 Category: Installing Views: 5254 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial includes debian Installation,FTP Server Setup,Webserver Setup,Samba Server Setup,Database Server Setup,time clock sync server,
Mail Server Configuration,VNC Server setup,Proxy Server Setup,SSH Server Setup,tftp Server Setup,DHCP Server Setup,
IPtables Configuration,DNS Server Setup,Firewalls configuration,Backup configuration
Debian

Using iSCSI On Debian Lenny (Initiator And Target)

Post date: March 12, 2009, 12:03 Category: Installing Views: 3561 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Debian Lenny. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling. To the iSCSI initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
Linux

Configure Multiple Network Profiles on Linux

Post date: April 13, 2005, 02:04 Category: Network Views: 2576 Comments
Tutorial quote: Mobile Linux users face some interesting (OK, vexing) challenges when they want to plug into different networks. Any Linux system will easily support all manner of networking profiles--dialup, ISDN, Ethernet, wireless--the tricky bit is configuration. Manually re-configuring a PC for every connection is low on most users' lists of "fun things to do." You can be an ace scripting guru and fiddle up something yourself, or you can find a nice ready-made utility to do the work for you. Unfortunately, I have not found a universal utility to do this. However, there are a lot of utilities specific to various distributions, and an assortment of other utilities.
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