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Search results for Execute Commands on Multiple Linux or UNIX Servers part II

Unix+clones

Arcane Linux Commands: dc

Post date: September 26, 2007, 09:09 Category: Software Views: 3354 Comments
Tutorial quote: A beginner-friendly guide to dc, the Unix command-line calculator. Answers many questions that the man page doesn't.
Linux

Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Post date: May 26, 2006, 18:05 Category: System Views: 2743 Comments
Tutorial quote: The cpio command is one of the most commonly used Linux back up tools.

The cpio command has two unusual features

Unlike tar , in which the files to back up are typed in as part of the command, cpio reads the files to work with from the standard input (in other words, the screen).

This feature means that cpio must be used as part of a multiple command or with a redirection pipe. Examples of this usage are shown in the tables below.

cpio must always be used with one of three flags. Flags are options that set the mode in which the command runs. Only one flag can be used at a time, and it must come before any other options. In addition, the choice of flags limits the options that can be used. Each flag also has a gnu option that can used in its place. The gnu option gives a convenient name for each flag: extract, create, and pass- through.
Debian

Mini-Howto for User Mode Linux

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: System Views: 2290 Comments
Tutorial quote: UML ("User Mode Linux") allows you to run multiple Linux servers on one physical machine. This can be handy for many different purposes. For example, you might want to give different people root rights, but prevent them from interfering with one another. Or, you might want to have several identically configured servers, one for production, one for development, and one for testing, but without investing in multiple physical machines.

Once you have prepared your machine for running UML instances as described in the following section, adding new instances will take less than five minutes. The preparation, however, might take a bit longer.
Unix+clones

Linux Commands I Hardly Knew

Post date: June 29, 2008, 18:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 5353 Comments
Tutorial quote: Some interesting and rarely used commands for *nix based OS systems.
Linux

A Beginner's Guide To LVM

Post date: January 16, 2007, 19:01 Category: System Views: 3883 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide shows how to work with LVM (Logical Volume Management) on Linux. It also describes how to use LVM together with RAID1 in an extra chapter. As LVM is a rather abstract topic, this article comes with a Debian Etch VMware image that you can download and start, and on that Debian Etch system you can run all the commands I execute here and compare your results with mine. Through this practical approach you should get used to LVM very fast.
OpenBSD

Hardening OpenBSD Internet Servers

Post date: April 11, 2006, 22:04 Category: Security Views: 9304 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial on how-to harden or improve security on OpenBSD Internet servers includes sections that apply to any UNIX system. Hardening is making a computer more secure by removing unneeded functions, restricting access and tracking changes and processes. It was revised to cover OpenBSD 3.0 on Dec. 15, 2001 and includes an overview of the 2.9 to 3.0 changes. A new page on priorities ranks the value of the techniques presented here. Familiarity with UNIX system administration but not OpenBSD is assumed.
Linux

First Steps Of Running Linux Via Terminal Instead Of Desktop

Post date: August 8, 2011, 07:08 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3213 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial is supposed to show new Linux users how to handle Linux without having to browse through your desktop to edit files. The core commands to do this are the same on every Linux distribution, however there is a large variety of commands that differ from distribution to distribution, as does the install command.
Linux

Translating DOS to Linux

Post date: September 29, 2005, 17:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2576 Comments
Tutorial quote: So you know DOS. You're used to it, and it makes you feel warm and fuzzy. Snap out of it. This page is a list of Linux commands and they're DOS cousins, so you can feel more comfortable navigating in the Linux world, though you might have already known some of these commands if you've ever used an FTP client.
Linux

Arcane Linux Commands: dc

Post date: December 31, 2007, 01:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3478 Comments
Tutorial quote: If anybody within earshot of you is struggling to learn sed and ever remarks "This is like learning Klingon! Could they make it any more cryptic?", you can always point them to dc.

dc is the command-line Unix "Reverse-Polish Notation"(RPN) calculator. The name stands for "desktop calculator". OK, so what is a Polish calculator and why would you want to reverse one? The math that you do in school uses infix notation, with the operator between the numbers (3 + 5). Prefix notation puts the operator first (+ 3 5) and is what the Lisp language uses. The prefix notation is known as "Polish notation" after the nationality of Jan Łukasiewicz who invented it. Postfix notation, then, has the operator at the rear (3 5 +), and so is also the reverse of Polish notation.

What's the difference? In computer programming, you have to specify what order you want a multi-part calculation to be in. Everybody is familiar with the old problem of A*B-C. For A=5, B=3, C=2, multiplying first and subtracting second gives you 13, while subtracting first and multiplying second gives you 5. To specify which operations you want performed first, you have to either memorize the complex orders of operations (which change from one language to the next) or use a lot of parenthesis ((A*B)-C) or (A*(B-C)). Hey, that's what everybody complains about in all those languages that use parenthesis!
Debian

Triggering Commands On File/Directory Changes With Incron

Post date: September 2, 2008, 09:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3485 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide shows how you can install and use incron on a Debian Etch system. Incron is similar to cron, but instead of running commands based on time, it can trigger commands when file or directory events occur (e.g. a file modification, changes of permissions, etc.).
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