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eBox

Using eBox As A Gateway: Firewall, Traffic Shaping, HTTP Proxy And More

Post date: June 11, 2010, 12:06 Category: Installing Views: 5674 Comments
Tutorial quote: eBox Platform is the Linux small business server that allows you to manage all your network services like firewall, DHCP, DNS, VPN, proxy, IDS, mail, file and printer sharing, VoIP, IM and much more. These functionalities are tightly integrated, automating most tasks, avoiding mistakes and saving time for system administrators. This article will show you step by step how to use eBox as a Gateway, featuring network configuration, load balancing between two Internet connections with WAN failover and multigateway rules for policy routing, traffic shaping, DHCP and DNS cache for the LAN network and HTTP proxy with different content filtering policies and antivirus.
Unix+clones

Comparing MySQL performance

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3450 Comments
Tutorial quote: With the introduction of the 2.6 Linux kernel, FreeBSD-5-STABLE, Solaris 10, and now NetBSD 2.0, you might be wondering which of them offers superior database performance. In my previous article, I discussed the tools I chose to test these venerable operating systems and the methodology by which they were tested. The result is this MySQL performance comparison between OpenBSD 3.6; NetBSD 2.0; FreeBSD 5.3 and 4.10; Solaris Express (build 69); and Linux 2.4 and 2.6 (Gentoo-based). Read on for the results.
Linux

Hardening Linux: a 10 step approach to a secure server

Post date: June 22, 2005, 10:06 Category: Security Views: 3554 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Internet has become a far more dangerous place than it was 20 years ago. Nowadays, Operating System and application security is an integral part of a server configuration and, while firewalls are very important, they are not the panacea.

This list of steps is intended as a guideline with a practical approach. We’ll try to provide a complete picture without getting into unnecesary details. This list won’t replace a good book on secure systems administration, but it will be useful as a quick guide.

Before we get started it’s worth to mention that security is not a status: it’s just a process. The correct initial setup of the server only provides a good start and helps you get half the way through. But you actually need to walk the other half of the road, by providing proper security vigilance, monitoring and updating.
Debian

Setting Up A High-Availability Load Balancer (With Failover and Session Support) With HAProxy/Keepalived On Debian Etch

Post date: October 29, 2007, 09:10 Category: Network Views: 4711 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy and keepalived on Debian Etch. The load balancer sits between the user and two (or more) backend Apache web servers that hold the same content. Not only does the load balancer distribute the requests to the two backend Apache servers, it also checks the health of the backend servers. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining backend server. In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using keepalived, and if the master fails, the slave becomes the master, which means the users will not notice any disruption of the service. HAProxy is session-aware, which means you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions (such as forums, shopping carts, etc.).
Debian

Setting Up A High-Availability Load Balancer (With Failover and Session Support) With HAProxy/Heartbeat On Debian Etch

Post date: November 7, 2007, 11:11 Category: Network Views: 4523 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy and heartbeat on Debian Etch. The load balancer sits between the user and two (or more) backend Apache web servers that hold the same content. Not only does the load balancer distribute the requests to the two backend Apache servers, it also checks the health of the backend servers. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining backend server. In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using heartbeat, and if the master fails, the slave becomes the master, which means the users will not notice any disruption of the service. HAProxy is session-aware, which means you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions (such as forums, shopping carts, etc.).
Linux

Upstream Provider Woes? Point the Ping of Blame

Post date: April 14, 2005, 12:04 Category: Network Views: 2442 Comments
Tutorial quote: Your users are complaining that "the Internet is, like, all slow." Users are always complaining, but you're seeing a lot of timeouts when you check mail, surf the Web, or try to log in for remote administration. Or even worse, latency is so bad that you keep getting killed all to heck in your favorite gory violent online multi-player game, so you know there is a problem. But there a lot of potential bottlenecks between your PC and the outside world, like your Internet gateway, proxy server, firewall, Internet service provider, and so forth, so where do you begin?

One of the best and most versatile network tools you can have is a notebook PC running Linux. This lets you plug in anywhere to run tests and find out what is going on. Make it a nothing-to-lose box--don't keep data on it so you can wipe and reinstall the operating system as necessary, because you want to be able to run tests outside of firewalls. Don't run any services. You can put a minimal iptables firewall on it, as there is no point in being totally exposed, but keep it simple. (Use MondoRescue to make a system snapshot for fast restores.)
Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 11.10 Server

Post date: November 27, 2011, 11:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 27634 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tools that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 11.10 KVM server.
Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 11.04 Server

Post date: May 10, 2011, 11:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2565 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tool that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 11.04 KVM server.
Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 10.10 Server

Post date: November 30, 2010, 12:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2622 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tool that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 10.10 KVM server.
Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 8.10 Server

Post date: March 10, 2009, 12:03 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4090 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tool that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 8.10 KVM server.
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