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Debian

Xen from Backports on Debian Sarge

Post date: August 12, 2006, 18:08 Category: Software Views: 3251 Comments
Tutorial quote: There is a great howto about installing Xen on Debian Unstable. It is really easy to do and it runs fine. Nevertheless, on production servers, that's not an optimal solution. Debian Unstable has too many updates and things change too often. On production machines, a Xen host system should be stable, secure and should not need much attention. That is where Sarge comes in. If you pull the Xen packages from backports and install them on Debian stable you've got the best of both worlds. Let's do so!
Ubuntu

How to Increase ext3 and ReiserFS filesystems Performance in Linux

Post date: May 14, 2007, 00:05 Category: System Views: 5312 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how to increase ext3 and ReiserFS filesystems Performance in Linux.The ext3 or third extended filesystem is a journalled file system that is commonly used by the Linux operating system. It is the default file system for many popular Linux distributions
Unix+clones

Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance

Post date: February 12, 2006, 09:02 Category: Optimizing Views: 4483 Comments
Tutorial quote: Apache is an open-source HTTP server implementation. It is the most popular web server on the Internet; the December 2005 Web Server Survey conducted by Netcraft [1] shows that about 70% of the web sites on Internet are using Apache.

Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU, etc. But most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on Linux systems. Of course, it is assumed that there is enough hardware resources - especially enough RAM that the server isn't swapping frequently. First two sections look into various Compile-Time and Run-Time configuration options. The Run-Time section assumes that Apache is compiled with prefork MPM. HTTP compression and caching is discussed next. Finally, using separate servers for serving static and dynamic contents is covered. Basic knowledge of compiling and configuring Apache and Linux are assumed.
Linux+Mint

The Perfect Desktop - Linux Mint Debian 201009

Post date: November 4, 2010, 12:11 Category: Desktop Views: 4258 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can set up a Linux Mint Debian 201009 desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. While the "normal" Linux Mint editions are based on Ubuntu, Linux Mint Debian 201009 is a Linux distribution based on Debian Squeeze (testing); its aim is to look identical to the main edition and to provide the same functionality while using Debian as a base.
CentOS

Distributed Replicated Storage Across Four Nodes With GlusterFS (CentOS 5.4)

Post date: March 23, 2010, 13:03 Category: Installing Views: 4055 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running CentOS 5.4) to a distributed replicated storage with GlusterFS. Nodes 1 and 2 (replication1) as well as 3 and 4 (replication2) will mirror each other, and replication1 and replication2 will be combined to one larger storage server (distribution). Basically, this is RAID10 over network. If you lose one server from replication1 and one from replication2, the distributed volume continues to work. The client system (CentOS 5.4 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Ubuntu

Distributed Replicated Storage Across Four Nodes With GlusterFS On Ubuntu 9.10

Post date: January 19, 2010, 12:01 Category: Installing Views: 3176 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Ubuntu 9.10) to a distributed replicated storage with GlusterFS. Nodes 1 and 2 (replication1) as well as 3 and 4 (replication2) will mirror each other, and replication1 and replication2 will be combined to one larger storage server (distribution). Basically, this is RAID10 over network. If you lose one server from replication1 and one from replication2, the distributed volume continues to work. The client system (Ubuntu 9.10 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Fedora

Distributed Replicated Storage Across Four Nodes With GlusterFS On Fedora 12

Post date: March 9, 2010, 13:03 Category: Installing Views: 2927 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Fedora 12) to a distributed replicated storage with GlusterFS. Nodes 1 and 2 (replication1) as well as 3 and 4 (replication2) will mirror each other, and replication1 and replication2 will be combined to one larger storage server (distribution). Basically, this is RAID10 over network. If you lose one server from replication1 and one from replication2, the distributed volume continues to work. The client system (Fedora 12 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Gentoo

Creating a WebDAV server with apache2

Post date: May 26, 2005, 16:05 Category: Network Views: 5573 Comments
Tutorial quote: I needed a way to share information (both read and write) as easy as possible with friends in a quite restricted environment (firewall). In many cases, WebDAV which uses standard HTTP port 80 for comunication is a good solution for a file server application.
Debian

Processing 10000 Pictures Using Many Computers With Oropo (Debian/Ubuntu)

Post date: April 27, 2010, 11:04 Category: Installing Views: 3480 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you ever had a lot of data to process? In such a moment after a while of processing we realize that it will take ages to complete. It would be faster if we could use two or three or even more computers. Let's use some computers - you think it is a lot of configuration? You are wrong. With Oropo it's easy. Let's discuss a problem of processing large number of pictures. First approach for solving this problem is to process pictures sequentially on one computer. Second approach is to process pictures parallelly on many computers.
Debian

Installing Debian

Post date: September 30, 2005, 16:09 Category: Installing Views: 3262 Comments
Tutorial quote: The experience of installing Debian can vary widely depending on your hardware and requirements. There simply isn't room here to provide a comprehensive installation guide. Instead, you'll find an outline of the major points of the installation process, and plenty of information about where to go and what to do when things don't work as expected.

While Debian has a great reputation for day-to-day use, it has a poor (and not entirely unmerited) reputation for ease of installation. However, with the Debian 3.1 release, code-named Sarge, the developers have taken major steps to improve the installation experience, so don't be afraid.

Perhaps the best advice I can give concerning Debian installation is to not expect to always get it right the first time. If you're ready to start over and experiment, you'll soon become happy with the installation process.
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