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Search results for Filesystem Encryption Tools for Linux

Debian

Installation Of PlaySMS And SMS Server Tools 3 On Debian Server

Post date: February 24, 2011, 12:02 Category: Installing Views: 3538 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial will show you how you can set up an SMS server on Debian with playsms and smstools. In my example I have used an old Nokia 5140i with a USB datacable.
Unix+clones

Remote backup using ssh, tar and cron

Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2841 Comments
Tutorial quote: Are you looking for a solution to backup your data to a remote location? While a solid backup solution such as Arkeia or TSM from IBM are nice from an enterprise point of view, simpler solutions are available from a home user's perspective. I will walk you through on you how you can backup your data to a remote server, using the default tools available on all linux systems. In a nutshell, we will use ssh capabilities to allow a cron job to transfer a tarball from you local machine to a remote machine.

For the purpose of this tutorial, the local machine will be called “localmachine” (running slackware) and the remote server will be called “remoteserver” (slackware as well). The user will be joe (me). You will have to substitute those 3 with your own machines names and user.
Debian

Software RAID and Encrypted Filesystem Benchmarks

Post date: January 25, 2006, 23:01 Category: Benchmarks Views: 4710 Comments
Tutorial quote: Both tests use bonnie++ to test the disks.

- Files Test: create, destroy, and stat 20,000 files in sequential and random order. File sizes are random between 0K and 15k. All files are created in a single directory.
- IO Test: read, write, rewrite, and seek in three 1GB size files.
- Load: all tests are starting with 0 cpu load. Load was then measured every 2 seconds for the duration of the test and averaged over all measurements.
Debian

Spam filtering with Pyzor and SpamBayes

Post date: January 3, 2006, 04:01 Category: Security Views: 2806 Comments
Tutorial quote: Spam appears to be a fact of life for most of the online world at the moment. Here is how I personally handle the filtering of incoming mail, using a combination of Pyzor, SpamBayes and Procmail. These tools each integrate nicely, and work easily with my mail reader of choice: mutt.
OpenSUSE

Krusader - Advanced Twinpanel File Manager in openSUSE

Post date: October 10, 2008, 22:10 Category: Desktop Views: 3278 Comments
Tutorial quote: Krusader is an advanced twin panel (commander style) file manager for KDE and other desktops in the *nix world, similar to Midnight or Total Commander. It provides all the file management features you could possibly want with features like extensive archive handling, mounted filesystem support, FTP, advanced search module, an internal viewer/editor, directory synchronisation, file content comparisons, powerful batch renaming and much much more
Unix+clones

Convert any video file to DVD with open source tools

Post date: April 28, 2006, 17:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 4268 Comments
Tutorial quote: You've just downloaded the new episode of your favorite video podcast, and you'd like to watch it on your big-screen TV. Unfortunately, the video is encoded in XviD or QuickTime format, which your DVD player doesn't support. Don't worry -- here's how you can convert any video file to DVD using dvdauthor and MPlayer.
Debian

An apt-get primer

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: System Views: 2682 Comments
Tutorial quote: If any single program defines the Debian Linux project, that program is apt-get. apt-get is Debian's main tool for installing and removing software. Working with the .deb package format, apt-get offers sophisticated package management that few Red Hat Package Manager RPM-based distributions can match.

Besides the convenience, an advantage of apt-get is that it reduces the chances of falling into dependency hell, that limbo where software installation fails for lack of another piece of software, whose installation fails for lack of another piece of software, and so on. If you know how Debian's archive system works, and how to choose the sources that apt-get uses, and use a few precautions in your upgrades, then the chances are that dependency problems will never bedevil you. Should you descend into dependency hell anyway, apt-get offers useful tools for climbing out of it.
Linux

Enhancing kernel security with grsecurity

Post date: November 25, 2005, 21:11 Category: Security Views: 2821 Comments
Tutorial quote: Is your server as secure as it could be? Sure, you use a firewall, mandate strong passwords, and patch regularly. You even take a proactive approach by performing security audits with tools such as nmap and Nessus. Yet you may still be vulnerable to zero-day exploits and privilege escalation attacks. If these possibilities keep you awake at night, you're not alone. The sleepless folks with the grsecurity project have developed an easy-to-use set of security enhancements to help put your fears to rest.
Linux

Recover Data From a dead hard drive using ddrescue

Post date: December 3, 2006, 07:12 Category: System Views: 4676 Comments
Tutorial quote: this is simple tutorial how to recover you data from a damaged disk.Like dd, dd_rescue does copy data from one file or block device to another.dd_rescue is a tool to help you to save data from crashed partition. It tries to read and if it fails, it will go on with the next sectors where tools like dd will fail. If the copying process is interrupted by the user it is possible to continue at any position later. It can copy backwards.
RedHat

Ruby on Rails on Red Hat

Post date: November 27, 2006, 07:11 Category: Network Views: 6363 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ruby on Rails is an open source freely available web development framework. It's been quite popular--it won a Jolt "Web Development Tools" award last year, and some prominent Java developers have publically switched to Ruby on Rails. The buzz surrounding Rails is quite impressive--particularly when you consider that Rails had no Fortune 500 company to market it, unlike .NET or Java.

Rails is a Model View Controller (MVC) framework. As you can imagine from the name, applications written using Model View Controller frameworks have three main components: a model, which represents the data and associated logic; the view, which represents how a user interacts with the application; and the controller, which contains all of the business logic that drives the application. This is an artificial distinction, of course, but it is a powerful one.

You'll need Apache 2.0+ and MySQL installed on your Red Hat Linux computer to run these examples.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink