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Search results for Filesystem Encryption Tools for Linux

OpenSUSE

Linux Kernel Magic SysRq keys in openSUSE for crash recovery

Post date: September 28, 2008, 17:09 Category: System Views: 3372 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux Kernel offers you something that allows you to recover your system from a crash or at the least lets you to perform a proper shutdown using the Magic SysRq Keys. The magic SysRq key is a select key combination in the Linux kernel which allows the user to perform various low level commands regardless of the system’s state using the SysRq key. It is often used to recover from freezes, or to reboot a computer without corrupting the filesystem.
Unix+clones

How to Use GIMP for Photo and Image Editing

Post date: April 16, 2005, 00:04 Category: Software Views: 2549 Comments
Tutorial quote: In today's hands-on tutorial, you will learn how to apply The GIMP's powerful layer and pattern tools to put a frame or border around a digital photo or digital image by editing a photograph in our digital darkroom. It's a simple application of what you already have learned in our Gimp tutorial series about using the Gimp's layer and pattern tools.
Linux

WiFi PDA Meets Linux--Part 3

Post date: May 28, 2005, 22:05 Category: Software Views: 2557 Comments
Tutorial quote: Did you know that your new WiFi-equipped iPAQ can be used as a VoIP communicator? How about your Linux notebook? The program that makes it possible is called Skype and it lets you call other Skype users over the Internet for free. You can also call regular phone numbers for very competitive per-minute rates. As it turns out, Skype is available for both platforms and Windows, too. Although it's not an Open Source solution, it is freely available and fits nicely into our WiFi-PDA-meets-Linux bag of tools.

Join me now to discover how you can use the program on the iPAQ and a Linux notebook.
Windows

Three Ways To Access Linux Partitions (ext2/ext3) From Windows On Dual-Boot Systems

Post date: January 20, 2008, 12:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 6510 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you have a dual-boot Windows/Linux system, you probably know this problem: you can access files from your Windows installation while you are in Linux, but not the other way round. This tutorial shows three ways how you can access your Linux partitions (with ext2 or ext3 filesystem) from within Windows: Explore2fs, DiskInternals Linux Reader, and the Ext2 Installable File System For Windows. While the first two provide read-only access, the Ext2 Installable File System For Windows can be used for read and write operations.
Ubuntu

Disk ARchive (Backup and Restore) using dar and kdar(dar Frontend)

Post date: January 12, 2007, 18:01 Category: System Views: 3659 Comments
Tutorial quote: Dar is a shell command that makes backup of a directory tree and files. Its features include splitting archives over several files, CDs, ZIPs, or floppies, compression, full or differential backups, strong encryption, proper saving and restoration of hard links and extended attributes, remote backup using pipes and external command (such as ssh), and rearrangement of the “slices” of an existing archive. It can now run commands between slices, encrypt archives, and quickly retrieve individual files from differential and full backups. Dar also has external GUI like kdar for Linux,thanks to the well documented API.
Unix+clones

Comparing MySQL performance

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3425 Comments
Tutorial quote: With the introduction of the 2.6 Linux kernel, FreeBSD-5-STABLE, Solaris 10, and now NetBSD 2.0, you might be wondering which of them offers superior database performance. In my previous article, I discussed the tools I chose to test these venerable operating systems and the methodology by which they were tested. The result is this MySQL performance comparison between OpenBSD 3.6; NetBSD 2.0; FreeBSD 5.3 and 4.10; Solaris Express (build 69); and Linux 2.4 and 2.6 (Gentoo-based). Read on for the results.
Debian

Securing Debian Manual

Post date: January 1, 2008, 13:01 Category: Security Views: 3678 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes security in the Debian project and in the Debian operating system. Starting with the process of securing and hardening the default Debian GNU/Linux distribution installation, it also covers some of the common tasks to set up a secure network environment using Debian GNU/Linux, gives additional information on the security tools available and talks about how security is enforced in Debian by the security and audit team.
Debian

Creating A Fully Encrypted Para-Virtualised Xen Guest System Using Debian Lenny

Post date: May 3, 2009, 10:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3403 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document explains how to set up a fully encrypted para-virtualized XEN instance. In this howto, the host system is running Debian Etch, while the guest system to be installed will be using Debian Lenny. If you are concerned about your privacy, you might want to consider using hard disk encryption to protect your valuable private data from spying eyes. Usually, the easiest way would be to use your distribution's installer to set up a fully encrypted system; I think most recent Linux distributions support this. However, when you are using XEN to provide virtualization, there are situations where you might not want to encrypt your whole computer with all guest instances, but instead only encrypt one OS instance. This howto will deal with exactly this situation. It assumes that the XEN host system is already up and running.
Debian

System encryption on Debian Etch

Post date: August 16, 2006, 16:08 Category: Security Views: 5038 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this article I will describe how to setup a nearly complete encrypted system using Debian Etch and cryptsetup with LUKS. The goal is: encrypt all partitions except /boot. The user should enter a password at boot time or provide a keyfile on an USB device to decrypt the root partition. Keyfiles for additional partitions are located on the root, so the user does not need to enter a password for every partition.
Linux

Modify Your Partitions With GParted Without Losing Data

Post date: January 23, 2007, 23:01 Category: System Views: 3771 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article shows how you can modify the partitioning of your Linux system with GParted (Gnome Partition Editor) without losing data. This includes resizing partitions (enlarging and shrinking), moving partitions on the hard drive, creating and deleting partitions, and even modifying filesystem types. GParted is a free partition editor available as a desktop program and also as a Live-CD. It supports the following filesystems: ext2, ext3, fat16, fat32, hfs, hfs+, jfs, linux-swap, reiserfs, reiser4, ufs, xfs, and even ntfs (Windows).
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