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Linux

Chrooting Apache

Post date: April 13, 2005, 00:04 Category: Security Views: 2700 Comments
Tutorial quote: The chroot daemon allows you to run a program and have it see a given directory as the root (/) directory. This effectively locks the process into its very own filesystem ("chroot jail") isolated from the real / filesystem. In this article we will look at how to install the Apache Web server in such an environment.
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems Part II

Post date: January 6, 2006, 22:01 Category: Benchmarks Views: 4676 Comments
Tutorial quote: After the last article was published, I have received more than a dozen requests for a second filesystem benchmark using the 2.6 kernel. Since that time, I have converted entirely to XFS for every Linux machine I use, so I may be a bit bias regarding the XFS filesystem. I tried to keep the hardware roughly the same. Instead of a Western Digital 250GB and Promise ATA/100 controller, I am now am using a Seagate 400GB and Maxtor ATA/133 Promise controller. The physical machine remains the same, there is an additional 664MB of swap and I am now running Debian Etch. In the previous article, I was running Slackware 9.1 with custom compiled filesystem utilities. I've added a small section in the beginning that shows the filesystem creation and mount time, I've also added a graph showing these new benchmarks. After the first round of benchmarks, I received a sleuth of e-mails asking for the raw numbers. The numbers are now included in tables at the end of this e-mail for both the last and current set of benchmarks.
Debian

Mounting Remote Directories With SSHFS On Debian Squeeze

Post date: September 22, 2011, 10:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4106 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how you can mount a directory from a remote server on the local server securely using SSHFS. SSHFS (Secure SHell FileSystem) is a filesystem that serves files/directories securely over SSH, and local users can use them just as if the were local files/directories. On the local computer, the remote share is mounted via FUSE (Filesystem in Userspace). I will use Debian Squeeze for both the local and the remote server.
Linux

Filesystem Encryption Tools for Linux

Post date: May 28, 2007, 00:05 Category: System Views: 3392 Comments
Tutorial quote: Crypto filesystems keep your data safe – even if someone steals your computer.Linux offers a number of encrypted filesystem options – each with a different approach to the encryption problem.Encrypted filesystems may be overkill
for family photos or your résumé, but they make sense for network-accessible servers that hold sensitive business
documents, databases that contain credit-card information, offline backups, and laptops.
BSD

Managing Filesystems : fstab

Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: System Views: 6551 Comments
Tutorial quote: Understanding how the BSD filesystem manages disk space is critical to successfully managing a BSD server or workstation. However, this topic is generally overlooked since it is rarely used outside of installation and upgrades. It is also a very simple topic and most people assume you understand how it all works.

This article gives a quick synopsis on filesystem layout and tries to briefly explain how to understand /etc/fstab. The fstab(5) man pages, while good, do little to teach the basics to new sysadmins.
Debian

How To Encrypt Directories/Partitions With eCryptfs On Debian Squeeze

Post date: July 26, 2011, 11:07 Category: Installing Views: 2200 Comments
Tutorial quote: eCryptfs is a POSIX-compliant enterprise-class stacked cryptographic filesystem for Linux. You can use it to encrypt partitions and also directories that don't use a partition of their own, no matter the underlying filesystem, partition type, etc. This tutorial shows how to use eCryptfs to encrypt a directory on Debian Squeeze.
Ubuntu

Creating Backups With Back In Time On An Ubuntu 9.04 Desktop

Post date: August 25, 2009, 11:08 Category: Desktop Views: 2380 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how to install and use Back In Time on an Ubuntu 9.04 desktop. Back In Time is a simple backup tool for Linux inspired from "flyback project" and "TimeVault". The backup is done by taking snapshots of a specified set of directories.
Ubuntu

How to Create a Private Encrypted Folder On Ubuntu 8.10

Post date: March 5, 2009, 08:03 Category: System Views: 3900 Comments
Tutorial quote: eCryptfs is a POSIX-compliant enterprise-class stacked cryptographic filesystem for Linux.It provides advanced key management and policy features. eCryptfs stores cryptographic metadata in the header of each file written, so that encrypted files can be copied between hosts; the
file will be decryptable with the proper key, and there is no need to keep track of any additional information aside from what is already in the encrypted file itself. Think of
eCryptfs as a sort of gnupgfs.eCryptfs is a native Linux filesystem. The kernel module component of eCryptfs is part of the Linux kernel since 2.6.19.
Ubuntu

How to Create a Private Encrypted Folder On Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid)

Post date: January 13, 2009, 13:01 Category: System Views: 4064 Comments
Tutorial quote: eCryptfs is a POSIX-compliant enterprise-class stacked cryptographic filesystem for Linux.It provides advanced key management and policy features. eCryptfs stores cryptographic metadata in the header of each file written, so that encrypted files can be copied between hosts; the file will be decryptable with the proper key, and there is no need to keep track of any additional information aside from what is already in the encrypted file itself. Think of eCryptfs as a sort of gnupgfs.eCryptfs is a native Linux filesystem. The kernel module component of eCryptfs is part of the Linux kernel since 2.6.19.

Linux

Xen: How to Convert An Image-Based Guest To An LVM-Based Guest

Post date: April 19, 2009, 10:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3121 Comments
Tutorial quote: This short article explains how you can move/convert a Xen guest that uses disk images to LVM volumes. Virtual machines that use disk images are very slow and heavy on disk IO, therefore it is often better to use LVM. Also, LVM-based guests are easier to back up (using LVM snapshots).
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