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Search results for Flash Player 9 on Linux (Ubuntu Dapper Drake)

Debian

Generating Web Site Statistics With AWStats & JAWStats On Debian Lenny

Post date: June 27, 2010, 20:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4867 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how you can generate statistics for your web site with AWStats and JAWStats on a Debian Lenny web server. AWStats is a free powerful and featureful tool that generates advanced web server statistics. JAWStats runs in conjunction with AWStats and produces clear and informative charts, graphs and tables about your website visitors. AWStats is able to create graphical web pages for the statistics, but JAWStats presents this data in a much nicer way - it's much better organized and makes use of Ajax and Flash.
Ubuntu

Virus Protection With AVG Antivirus On Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

Post date: September 10, 2007, 22:09 Category: Security Views: 3873 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can install and use AVG Antivirus on an Ubuntu Feisty Fawn desktop. Although there are not many Linux viruses out there, this can be useful if you often exchange files with Windows users - it can help you to not pass on any Windows viruses (that do not do any harm to Linux systems) to Windows users. AVG Antivirus for Linux is free for private and non-commercial use.
Ubuntu

Virus Protection With F-PROT Antivirus On Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

Post date: September 24, 2007, 08:09 Category: Security Views: 3758 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can install and use F-PROT Antivirus on an Ubuntu Feisty Fawn desktop. Although there are not many Linux viruses out there, this can be useful if you often exchange files with Windows users - it can help you to not pass on any Windows viruses (that do not do any harm to Linux systems) to Windows users. F-PROT Antivirus for Linux is free for home use.
Linux

Upstream Provider Woes? Point the Ping of Blame

Post date: April 14, 2005, 12:04 Category: Network Views: 2390 Comments
Tutorial quote: Your users are complaining that "the Internet is, like, all slow." Users are always complaining, but you're seeing a lot of timeouts when you check mail, surf the Web, or try to log in for remote administration. Or even worse, latency is so bad that you keep getting killed all to heck in your favorite gory violent online multi-player game, so you know there is a problem. But there a lot of potential bottlenecks between your PC and the outside world, like your Internet gateway, proxy server, firewall, Internet service provider, and so forth, so where do you begin?

One of the best and most versatile network tools you can have is a notebook PC running Linux. This lets you plug in anywhere to run tests and find out what is going on. Make it a nothing-to-lose box--don't keep data on it so you can wipe and reinstall the operating system as necessary, because you want to be able to run tests outside of firewalls. Don't run any services. You can put a minimal iptables firewall on it, as there is no point in being totally exposed, but keep it simple. (Use MondoRescue to make a system snapshot for fast restores.)
Ubuntu

Installing Kernel Updates Without Reboot With Ksplice Uptrack On Ubuntu 9.10

Post date: February 14, 2010, 13:02 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2562 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ksplice Uptrack is a subscription service that lets you apply 100% of the important kernel security updates released by your Linux vendor without rebooting. Ksplice Uptrack is freely available for the desktop versions of Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic and Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty. This tutorial shows how to install and use it on an Ubuntu 9.10 desktop.
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 7.04(Feisty Fawn) Screenshots Tour

Post date: May 14, 2007, 00:05 Category: Desktop Views: 3043 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ubuntu is a community developed, linux-based operating system that is perfect for laptops, desktops and servers. It contains all the applications you need - a web browser, presentation, document and spreadsheet software, instant messaging and much more.The most recent version, Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn), was released on April 19, 2007.
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron) Screenshots Tour

Post date: May 11, 2008, 14:05 Category: Desktop Views: 3521 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ubuntu is a community developed, linux-based operating system that is perfect for laptops, desktops and servers. It contains all the applications you need - a web browser, presentation, document and spreadsheet software, instant messaging and much more.The most recent version, Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron), was released on April 24, 2008.

Ubuntu

Running The Chromium Browser On Ubuntu 8.04 With CrossOver Chromium

Post date: October 9, 2008, 11:10 Category: Desktop Views: 3117 Comments
Tutorial quote: Chromium is an open-source browser project that is the basis for Google's Chrome browser. Right now, Chromium doesn't support Linux natively, but Codeweavers has created a Linux port called CrossOver Chromium that can be installed free of charge. This guide shows how to install CrossOver Chromium on Ubuntu 8.04.
Ubuntu

MythTV w/PVR-150 Setup on Ubuntu Linux Breezy Badger (5.10)

Post date: December 16, 2005, 22:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 3564 Comments
Tutorial quote: Good how-to for installing MythTV on Ubuntu in 45 minutes.
Ubuntu

Setting up an Ubuntu media server

Post date: April 23, 2008, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 14686 Comments
Tutorial quote: In today's tip I'm going to run through how to setup an Ubuntu media server. First of all, what is Ubuntu. Wikipedia says:

Ubuntu is a Linux distribution for desktops, laptops, and servers. It has consistently been rated among the most popular of the many GNU/Linux distributions. Ubuntu's goals include providing an up-to-date yet stable operating system for the average user and having a strong focus on usability and ease of installation.

It is very much like apache, which I showed you how to setup in my article on how to make your computer into a local server, in that it is commonly used as a server software. Now then, what is a media server?

To refer to Wikipedia again, a media server is

A media server is a computer appliance, ranging from an enterprise class machine providing video on demand, to, more commonly, a small home computer storing various digital media.

Basically, it's just like a local server which stores and shares solely media instead of other types of files. I'll leave the uses of one to your imagination. Let's on with setting it up.
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