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Linux

Port Knocking

Post date: April 16, 2005, 10:04 Category: Network Views: 3041 Comments
Tutorial quote: Firewall administrators are challenged to balance flexibility and security when designing a comprehensive rule set. A firewall should provide protection against malfeasants, while allowing trusted users to connect. Unfortunately, it is not always possible to filter out the bad guys, because filtering on the basis of IP addresses and ports does not distinguish connecting users. Bad guys can and do come from trusted IP addresses. Open ports remain a necessary vulnerability: they allow connections to applications but also may turn into open doors for attack. This article presents a new security system, termed port knocking, in which trusted users manipulate firewall rules by transmitting information across closed ports.
Fedora

Speed Up Your System With Preload On Fedora 8

Post date: March 16, 2008, 12:03 Category: Desktop Views: 2932 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install preload on Fedora 8. preload is an adaptive readahead daemon. It monitors applications that users run, and by analyzing this data, predicts what applications users might run, and fetches those binaries and their dependencies into memory for faster startup times.
Gentoo

GCC extension for protecting from stack-smashing attacks

Post date: April 20, 2005, 10:04 Category: Security Views: 3111 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Stack-Smashing Protector (SSP, formerly ProPolice) is perhaps one of the most sophisticated yet simplistic protective compiler technologies to date which makes use of canary values by rearranging local variables and function pointers. When (ssp) is enabled it can prevent many forms of the common return-to-libc attack. It is implemented as a patch to GCC which will automatically insert protection code into your programs at compile time. It is developed by Hiroaki Etoh at IBM.
Fedora

Virtual Users & Domains With Postfix, Courier, MySQL, SquirrelMail (Fedora 10)

Post date: February 1, 2009, 11:02 Category: Installing Views: 3258 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install a Postfix mail server that is based on virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database. I'll also demonstrate the installation and configuration of Courier (Courier-POP3, Courier-IMAP), so that Courier can authenticate against the same MySQL database Postfix uses. The resulting Postfix server is capable of SMTP-AUTH and TLS and quota (quota is not built into Postfix by default, I'll show how to patch your Postfix appropriately). Passwords are stored in encrypted form in the database (most documents I found were dealing with plain text passwords which is a security risk). In addition to that, this tutorial covers the installation of Amavisd, SpamAssassin and ClamAV so that emails will be scanned for spam and viruses. I will also show how to install SquirrelMail as a webmail interface so that users can read and send emails and change their passwords.
RedHat

How to set up a home DNS server

Post date: December 17, 2006, 17:12 Category: Network Views: 10165 Comments
Tutorial quote: In the first part of this series on the Domain Name System (DNS), we set up a caching nameserver that allowed our clients to take advantage of faster network operations by caching frequently requested DNS queries. In this article, we will extend our caching nameserver to a master nameserver that is responsible for managing the authoritative information for our internal client hostnames.
Fedora+Core

Tripwire on your Fedora Box

Post date: April 16, 2005, 00:04 Category: Security Views: 4929 Comments
Tutorial quote: Tripwire is an Intrusion Detection System. This can be used to alert users whenever their system is compromised. Tripwire detects and reports changes in system files. It will alert you through email whenever a change is detected. If the change is due to normal system activity, you can instruct Tripwire not to report the change to that file in future. If the change is not due to normal system activity, then it is a clear indication that something is wrong and you need to act immediately and fix the issue. Thus tripwire comes very handy to maintain the integrity of the system.

There is lot of information on the web about Tripwire. Some people might argue that AIDE (Advanced Intrusion Detection Environment) is better than tripwire and so on. This comparison is beyond the scope of this article. This is an introductory article for novice users who are interested in installing Tripwire on their Fedora Box. Advanced users can refer to the web for relevant information or they can contact appropriate mailing lists like fedora users mailing list.
Linux

VirtualBox On FC6 / CentOS 4 / OpenSuSE 10.2

Post date: February 6, 2007, 20:02 Category: Software Views: 3565 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to install and use VirtualBox on Fedora Core 6, CentOS 4, and OpenSuSE 10.2. InnoTek VirtualBox is a family of powerful x86 virtualization products for enterprise as well as home use. Not only is VirtualBox an extremely feature rich, high performance product for enterprise customers, it is also freely available as Open Source Software under the terms of the GNU Public License (GPL).
Linux

Setting the Clock on Linux

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: System Views: 2321 Comments
Tutorial quote: There are 3 protocols dealing with time: NTP (port 123), Time (port 37), and Daytime (port 13). If you're connecting to the Internet periodically, then synchronizing your clock when you dial up or from crontab is good enough. This applies also to most Linux machines at home or at work, even if they are connected all the time. Here is a short tutorial on how to set your clock using these 3 protocols.
Unix+clones

Benchmarking BSD and Linux

Post date: June 18, 2005, 22:06 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3702 Comments
Tutorial quote: These benchmarks are the result of my scalable network programming research. My interest in this area is to see how scalable and fast network applications can be on standard PC hardware.

I have done most of my research on Linux 2.4, 2.5 and 2.6 kernels using a home-grown distribution I affectionately call "Leanux". I have experimented with several APIs and methods to try and get the most scalability and performance out of a web server. The ultimate goal, however, is to demonstrate scalability by surviving a Slashdotting.
Unix+clones

Version Control with Subversion (Online book)

Post date: April 28, 2005, 03:04 Category: Software Views: 2398 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is the online home of Version Control with Subversion, a free book about Subversion, a new version control system designed to supplant CVS. As you may have guessed from the layout of this page, this book is published by O'Reilly Media.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink