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Linux

Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Post date: May 26, 2006, 18:05 Category: System Views: 2768 Comments
Tutorial quote: The cpio command is one of the most commonly used Linux back up tools.

The cpio command has two unusual features

Unlike tar , in which the files to back up are typed in as part of the command, cpio reads the files to work with from the standard input (in other words, the screen).

This feature means that cpio must be used as part of a multiple command or with a redirection pipe. Examples of this usage are shown in the tables below.

cpio must always be used with one of three flags. Flags are options that set the mode in which the command runs. Only one flag can be used at a time, and it must come before any other options. In addition, the choice of flags limits the options that can be used. Each flag also has a gnu option that can used in its place. The gnu option gives a convenient name for each flag: extract, create, and pass- through.
Debian

Gnu Privacy Guard (GPG)

Post date: March 21, 2006, 19:03 Category: Security Views: 2825 Comments
Tutorial quote: GNU Privacy Guard, or GPG, is a free replacement for the famous encryption tool PGP written by Phil Zimmermann. It is a tool for secure communication and data storage. It can be used to encrypt data and to create digital signatures. Here we'll provide a quick introduction to generating a key-pair and using it for basic tasks.
Ubuntu

The Perfect SpamSnake - Ubuntu Jeos 9.10

Post date: April 22, 2010, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 2618 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up an Ubuntu Jeos based server as a spamfilter in gateway mode. In the end, you will have a SpamSnake gateway which will relay clean emails to your MTA. You will also be able to view your incoming queue, train your SpamSnake and carry out a few more advanced operations via MailWatch.
Ubuntu

The Perfect SpamSnake - Ubuntu 8.04 LTS

Post date: May 4, 2008, 11:05 Category: Installing Views: 2697 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up an Ubuntu Hardy Heron (8.04 LTS) based server as a spamfilter in gateway mode. In the end, you will have a SpamSnake Gateway which will relay clean emails to your MTA. You will also be able to view your incoming queue, train your SpamSnake and carry out a few more advanced operations via MailWatch.
Ubuntu

The Perfect SpamSnake - Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope

Post date: June 12, 2009, 10:06 Category: Installing Views: 2343 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up an Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope based server as a spamfilter in Gateway mode. In the end, you will have a SpamSnake Gateway which will relay clean emails to your MTA. You will also be able to view your incoming queue, train your SpamSnake and carry out a few more advanced operations via MailWatch.
Debian

Creating a Wiki with kwiki

Post date: December 17, 2005, 22:12 Category: Software Views: 2745 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wikis are simple interactive websites which are extremely easy to use for storing easily updated text content. Using a Wiki you can easily create a lot of content with hyperlinks between them. Debian has packaged several different Wiki systems and here we'll look at installing just one of them: KWiki.

Wikis have become familiar to many people thanks to the popularity of large sites such as Wikipedia and can be very useful for creating collaborative websites.

Whilst there are many Wiki packages included in the Debian GNU/Linux distribution I've always had a soft spot for KWiki due to its simplicity, Perl nature, and low requirements.

Installing the software under Debian is very simple and we will show how to setup a new installation using the Debian Apache2 webserver package.
Unix+clones

Fileschanged

Post date: September 25, 2007, 18:09 Category: Software Views: 3370 Comments
Tutorial quote: Fileschanged is a GNU/Linux command-line utility that reports when files have been altered.
Linux

Roll Your Own Firewall

Post date: March 28, 2006, 21:03 Category: Network Views: 3106 Comments
Tutorial quote: A comprehensive user friendly guide to setting up your own firewall on GNU/Linux.
Unix+clones

Easy Automated Snapshot-Style Backups with Linux and Rsync

Post date: February 1, 2006, 00:02 Category: Software Views: 3072 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes a method for generating automatic rotating "snapshot"-style backups on a Unix-based system, with specific examples drawn from the author's GNU/Linux experience. Snapshot backups are a feature of some high-end industrial file servers; they create the illusion of multiple, full backups per day without the space or processing overhead. All of the snapshots are read-only, and are accessible directly by users as special system directories. It is often possible to store several hours, days, and even weeks' worth of snapshots with slightly more than 2x storage. This method, while not as space-efficient as some of the proprietary technologies (which, using special copy-on-write filesystems, can operate on slightly more than 1x storage), makes use of only standard file utilities and the common rsync program, which is installed by default on most Linux distributions. Properly configured, the method can also protect against hard disk failure, root compromises, or even back up a network of heterogeneous desktops automatically.
Linux

Rip DVDs in Linux the (Semi-)Easy Way

Post date: December 8, 2007, 14:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 3457 Comments
Tutorial quote: With its hacker-friendly aesthetic and open source mentality, you'd think a Linux desktop would be the best place to assert your digital rights—you know, make backup copies of your DVDs, convert them for iPods, that kind of thing.

And you'd be half right. There are plenty of programs that let you take control of your video discs, but they're only useful if you can make it through a maze of configuration menus, command line options, choices about bit rates and codecs, and the occasional confusing message about a missing library.

I've tried out a good number of DVD ripping and conversion programs, and I've made peace with one method, and one program, that gets the job done more often than not. It's not exactly one-click, but once your system is set up, you can drop in DVDs and back them up or convert them with relative ease.

Note on system differences: I set up my ripping/burning system on a Lenovo Thinkpad T61 running a brand-new installation of Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon). As with so many things Linux, packages and commands may vary based on your system. But for the most part, the tools I use in this walkthrough work across distributions and on both major desktop environments, GNOME and KDE.
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