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Debian

Avoiding slow package updates with package diffs

Post date: September 18, 2006, 13:09 Category: Network Views: 2950 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you're using the unstable or testing distribution of Debian GNU/Linux you will almost certainly have noticed that apt-get uses daily-diffs for its package updates. In many common situtations this is more bandwidth efficient, however it isn't always appropriate.

apt-get is a standard command which is used by many Debian users to manage package installation, and upgrades. (Although there are also other package managers such as synaptic, or aptitude.)
Linux

How To Modify Your Gnu/Linux Box To Serve As A USB Over IP Server

Post date: January 7, 2010, 13:01 Category: Installing Views: 2724 Comments
Tutorial quote: There was a long time that I was looking for a way to put away my old CRM server! But why? Because I had installed a virtualization environment with Xen and all my servers are turned to small VPS on a nice pretty infrastructure. The base point was that the CRM had a USB/Lock and there was no way to take the lock under a virtualized VPS. This tutorial shows how you can set up a USB-over-IP server.
Linux

Directory Directions...a Guide to the Linux File System

Post date: January 6, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 3247 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ever wonder what those short Linux file system folders mean and what they contain? A little tour with easy directions explains all here.
FreeBSD

Using Software RAID-1 with FreeBSD

Post date: November 29, 2005, 03:11 Category: System Views: 3678 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you ever needed a software RAID solution for a low-end server install? Perhaps you've wanted your workstation to take advantage of the redundancy provided by a disk mirror without investing in a hardware RAID controller. Has a prior painful configuration experience turned you off software RAID altogether on Unix systems?


Since 5.3-Release, FreeBSD comes with gmirror(8), which allows you to easily configure a software RAID 1 solution. While tutorials on gmirror exist, I found them to require either manual calculations of partition sizes with bsdlabel or the use of a fix-it floppy on an existing system.

It made more sense to me to configure RAID during the install of the operating system. I also wanted a procedure that was easy to follow and didn't introduce human error in the form of a math miscalculation. After cobbling together the available documentation and experimenting my way through various configurations, I came across a procedure that has worked well for me on several different systems. I also received valuable feedback from Pawel Jakub Dawidek, the author of gmirror, who gave some insight into some of the not yet documented features of gmirror.
OpenSUSE

Elisa - open Media center, multimedia player for openSUSE Linux

Post date: September 11, 2008, 22:09 Category: Multimedia Views: 4651 Comments
Tutorial quote: Elisa is an open source cross-platform media center connecting the Internet to an all-in-one media player. While primary development and deployment platform is GNU/Linux and Unix operating systems, elisa also currently support Microsoft Windows. Elisa runs on top of the GStreamer multimedia framework. In addition to personal video recorder functionality (PVR) and Music Jukebox support, Elisa will also interoperate with devices following the DLNA standard like Intel’s ViiV systems.
Coyote+Linux

Building A Linux Router

Post date: February 26, 2007, 07:02 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 8079 Comments
Tutorial quote: Building a reliable, full-featured broadband router can be very easy and cost-efficient. This article is about building one for routing a LAN to the Internet with NAT (Network Address Translation -- Linux users also call it as IP Masquerading) using an old computer and a Linux micro-distribution designed to have very low hardware requirements. We'll end up having a very simple and stable system, yet featuring e.g. iptables based stateful firewalling and remote administration.
Unix+clones

Downloading without a Browser

Post date: November 29, 2005, 19:11 Category: Software Views: 2962 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ever had to download a file so huge over a link so slow that you'd need to keep the web browser open for hours or days? What if you had 40 files linked from a single web page, all of which you needed -- will you tediously click on each one? What if the browser crashes before it can finish? GNU/Linux comes equipped with a handy set of tools for downloading in the background, independent of the browser. This allows you to log out, resume interrupted downloads, and even schedule them to occur during off-peak Net usage hours.
Debian

Debian RAID 1/5 system installer

Post date: May 28, 2005, 22:05 Category: Installing Views: 3119 Comments
Tutorial quote: Instructions for installing a very clean Debian GNU/Linux system that boots from RAID 1, and has RAID 1 or RAID 5 root and data filesystems.

The examples assume two identical harddrives, sda and sdb, on which after a small boot partition, 1 GB is used for swap, 25 GB is used for the root filesystem and everything else is for a big "data" partition that will hold non-system stuff.
Linux

Tools to access Linux Partitions from Windows

Post date: April 13, 2008, 20:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3453 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you dual boot with Windows and Linux, and have data spread across different partitions on Linux and Windows, you should be really in for some issues.

It happens sometimes you need to access your files on Linux partitions from Windows, and you realize it isn’t possible easily. Not really, with these tools in hand - it’s very easy for you to access files on your Linux partitions from Windows.
Unix+clones

Using MySQL to benchmark OS performance

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3503 Comments
Tutorial quote: It seems to be an exciting time for *nix operating systems, with a number of them recently releasing new versions that bring the addition of expanded features and claims of improved performance. If you're using GNU/Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD, or Solaris as a database server, you've probably recently considered an upgrade or switch to another OS in that list due to marketing hype and hearsay. This article will show you how to benchmark operating system performance using MySQL on these OSes so you can find out for yourself if you're missing out. While this may not necessarily be indicative of overall system performance or overall database application performance, it will tell you specifically how well MySQL performs on your platform.

The following operating systems were used for the comparison testing:
- FreeBSD 4.11
- FreeBSD 5.3
- NetBSD 2.0
- Linux 2.6
- Linux 2.4
- Solaris 10 x86 (build 69)
- OpenBSD 3.6
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