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Debian

Upgrade Debian Lenny To Squeeze In A Few Simple Steps

Post date: February 8, 2011, 12:02 Category: Installing Views: 3124 Comments
Tutorial quote: One rather old laptop and one server were the test objects for this howto. Both systems do not have any RAID devices and use a simple partition scheme from a default basic Lenny install. If your setup deviates much from this, it's highly recommended to read all details of the Debian Release Notes before you continue. Be warned. All commands are run as root and Debian recommends to use apt-get for the Squeeze upgrade process.
Linux

Mastering the Enterprise Volume Management System

Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: System Views: 3362 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Enterprise Volume Management System, or EVMS, is a disk, partition, and file system manager for Linux that claims to be a comprehensive tool for all disk management tasks. I ran across EVMS and found the idea appealing, so I decided to try it out. I've been working with it for a couple of weeks now, and this article describes what I found.
Linux

Backup and Restore Linux Partitions Using Partimage

Post date: January 22, 2007, 18:01 Category: Installing Views: 3718 Comments
Tutorial quote: Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX utility which saves partitions in many formats (see below) to an image file. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable floppies (ZIP for example), … Partitions can be saved across the network since version 0.6.0.When using Partimage, the partitions must be unmounted.
Linux

Back Up/Restore Hard Drives And Partitions With Ghost4Linux

Post date: January 11, 2007, 19:01 Category: System Views: 4989 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can back up and restore hard drives and partitions with Ghost4Linux. Ghost4Linux is a Linux Live-CD that you insert into your computer; it contains hard disk and partition imaging and cloning tools similar to Norton Ghost. The created images are compressed and transferred to an FTP server instead of cloning locally.
RedHat

Getting started with RHEL4's built-in LVM tools

Post date: June 3, 2005, 16:06 Category: System Views: 6819 Comments
Tutorial quote: Many Unix administrators I know (you know who you are), always used to smirk when I talked about Linux. They could always point to the fact that regardless of whatever I could say, they had journaling file systems, which they could manage using various Logical Volume Management (LVM) tools, and I couldn't touch that.

Well, not any more! Not only does Red Hat offer ext3 as their default file system, but they offer great management tools to boot. As we know, ext2 had a great lifespan, but it was not an enterprise-ready file system that could handle large disk partitions, fast recovery from systems crashes, or large amounts of files. Journaling file systems give you the ability to recover almost instantly from a crash, as you do not need to run fsck after a restart. Similar to how databases recover from crashes, a journaling file system tracks changes to file system metadata and pretty much guarantees that either all or no updates have completed. Of course, these file systems also need elaborate tools to help better configure and manage them accordingly.
CloneZilla

Back Up/Restore Hard Drives And Partitions With CloneZilla Live

Post date: November 30, 2008, 13:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 11403 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can back up and restore hard drives and partitions with CloneZilla Live. CloneZilla Live is a Linux Live-CD that you insert into your computer; it contains hard disk and partition imaging and cloning tools similar to Norton Ghost. The created images are compressed and can be transferred to a Samba-, SSH-, or NFS server or to a local hard drive or USB drive.
OpenSUSE

Read - Write support for NTFS partition on OpenSuse 11.x

Post date: January 12, 2009, 08:01 Category: Desktop Views: 4021 Comments
Tutorial quote: The ntfs-3g driver is an open source, GPL licensed, third generation Linux NTFS driver which was implemented by the Linux-NTFS project. It provides full read-write access to NTFS, excluding access to encrypted files, writing compressed files, changing file ownership, access right.

Technically it's based on and a major improvement to the third generation Linux NTFS driver, ntfsmount. The improvements includes functionality, quality and performance enhancements.
Ubuntu

A much easier way to install Ubuntu on a USB device (Stick or Hard Disk)!

Post date: June 1, 2008, 21:06 Category: Software Views: 5030 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial will explain A much easier way to install Ubuntu on a USB device (Stick or Hard Disk).I was reading How to install Ubuntu Linux from USB Stick posted a while ago, and found it to be quite some work to get Ubuntu working on a USB stick. Besides, having to prepare your USB device, creating a separate partition on it which will be more or less “useless” after the installation, giving up 750MB of space?

Ubuntu

Installing Ubuntu From A Windows System With Wubi

Post date: September 11, 2007, 22:09 Category: Installing Views: 3930 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wubi is an Ubuntu installer for Windows that lets you install and uninstall Ubuntu from a Windows desktop. Wubi adds an entry to the Windows boot menu which allows you to run Linux. Ubuntu is installed within a file in the Windows file system (a loopmounted partition), this file is seen by Ubuntu as a real hard disk. That way the hard drive does not have to be repartitioned before the Ubuntu installation. The resulting Ubuntu installation is a "real" Linux system, not just a virtual machine. Wubi makes it easy for Linux newbies to play around with Ubuntu.
Linux

Breaking the SHELL

Post date: May 29, 2005, 01:05 Category: Programming Views: 3941 Comments
Tutorial quote: Shell scripts are a part and parcel of almost all software applications running on UNIX, and the use simply spans from a trivial script, managing automatic database backup to bunch of scripts collaboratively doing complex operation on regular expressions.

Though it's a mere design decision to partition modules between scripts and programming language, but I personally feel that they sometimes come very handy saving lot of time and lines of code, when compared to implementing the same functionality in the programming language in context.And in fact with some exceptions, complexity of a shell script can scale to that of codes in C language. Add to this the power of all those numerous UNIX commands, and just think through, what can be achieved by shell scripts.
Here I will discuss few topics mainly relevant to intermediate shell programmers
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