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FreeBSD

Secure Batch Email on FreeBSD with UUCP and SSH

Post date: April 19, 2005, 02:04 Category: Network Views: 3745 Comments
Tutorial quote: Not everyone has reliable, always-on Internet access. For some, reliability has to come through software, not hardware. Fortunately, protocols designed to work around slow and unreliable networks still work. Christophe Prevotaux demonstrates how to set up FreeBSD, Postfix, and SSH to send and receive email via UUCP.
Mandriva

Distributed Replicated Storage Across 4 Nodes With GlusterFS On Mandriva 2010.0

Post date: April 20, 2010, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 4788 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Mandriva 2010.0) to a distributed replicated storage with GlusterFS. Nodes 1 and 2 (replication1) as well as 3 and 4 (replication2) will mirror each other, and replication1 and replication2 will be combined to one larger storage server (distribution). Basically, this is RAID10 over network. If you lose one server from replication1 and one from replication2, the distributed volume continues to work. The client system (Mandriva 2010.0 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Debian

Distributed Replicated Storage Across Four Nodes With GlusterFS On Debian Lenny

Post date: June 30, 2009, 11:06 Category: Installing Views: 4306 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Debian Lenny) to a distributed replicated storage with GlusterFS. Nodes 1 and 2 (replication1) as well as 3 and 4 (replication2) will mirror each other, and replication1 and replication2 will be combined to one larger storage server (distribution). Basically, this is RAID10 over network. If you lose one server from replication1 and one from replication2, the distributed volume continues to work. The client system (Debian Lenny as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86-64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
CentOS

Creating A Local Yum Repository (CentOS)

Post date: June 16, 2007, 22:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 5749 Comments
Tutorial quote: Sometimes it can be handy to set up your own repository to prevent from downloading the remote repository over and over again. This tutorial shows how to create a CentOS mirror for your local network. If you have to install multiple systems in your local network then all needed packages can be downloaded over the fast LAN connection, thus saving your internet bandwidth.
Unix+clones

Get More Out of Your Pipe with Apache and mod_gzip

Post date: April 14, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 3021 Comments
Tutorial quote: Some Web sites seem like they are designed to annoy and alienate visitors. Teeny tiny fixed fonts, weirdo fixed page widths, ad servers on Mars, and the content won't load until the ads do, and all kinds of dynamic jiggery-pokery that does everything but quickly deliver a nice, readable page.

Webmasters who are serious about running high-performance Web servers, and who want pleased and delighted visitors, have a great tool in Apache 1.3's mod_gzip. mod_gzip compresses pages on the fly, reducing their size considerably. Depending on the types of files served, you'll see size reductions ranging from 20%- 80%, and a nice increase in server efficiency. Nothing is needed on the client side, except sane modern Web browsers like Mozilla, Firefox, Opera, Galeon, and Konqueror. Mozilla, Firefox, and Opera are nice cross-platform browsers with all kinds of neat features, so don't be afraid to standardize on one of them.
Fedora

How To Install Adobe Flash Player 10 into Firefox 3 under Fedora 9

Post date: October 4, 2008, 17:10 Category: Software Views: 4510 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Flash Player has been improved to support new and cool internet browsing features such as 3D effects, advanced 3D layouts and more. You can visit Adobe Flash Player 10 cool features here.
Ubuntu

Installing Songbird Media Player On Ubuntu 8.04

Post date: June 5, 2008, 10:06 Category: Desktop Views: 3738 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up Songbird 0.5 on Ubuntu 8.04. Taken from the Songbird page: "Songbird is a desktop media player mashed-up with the Web. Songbird is committed to playing the music you want, from the sites you want, on the devices you want, challenging the conventions of discovery, purchase, consumption and organization of music on the Internet."
Linux

Setting the Clock on Linux

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: System Views: 2847 Comments
Tutorial quote: There are 3 protocols dealing with time: NTP (port 123), Time (port 37), and Daytime (port 13). If you're connecting to the Internet periodically, then synchronizing your clock when you dial up or from crontab is good enough. This applies also to most Linux machines at home or at work, even if they are connected all the time. Here is a short tutorial on how to set your clock using these 3 protocols.
SuSe

Adobe Flash Player 10 installation on OpenSuSe

Post date: November 16, 2008, 06:11 Category: Installing Views: 6327 Comments
Tutorial quote: With Flash Player 10, Adobe is focusing on building "expressive" applications for the Web, said Tom Barclay, Adobe senior product marketing manager for Flash Player. Applications can be deployed including online video, rich Internet applications, online games, and other interactive experiences.
Coyote+Linux

Building A Linux Router

Post date: February 26, 2007, 07:02 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 9114 Comments
Tutorial quote: Building a reliable, full-featured broadband router can be very easy and cost-efficient. This article is about building one for routing a LAN to the Internet with NAT (Network Address Translation -- Linux users also call it as IP Masquerading) using an old computer and a Linux micro-distribution designed to have very low hardware requirements. We'll end up having a very simple and stable system, yet featuring e.g. iptables based stateful firewalling and remote administration.
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