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PC-BSD

The Perfect Desktop - PC-BSD 1.5

Post date: March 20, 2008, 12:03 Category: Desktop Views: 9660 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up PC-BSD v1.5. This release is based upon FreeBSD 6.3 and uses KDE 3.5.8 as default desktop environment. Taken from the PC-BSD page: PC-BSD is a complete desktop operating system, which has been designed with the "casual" computer user in mind. It offers the stability and security that only a BSD-based operating system can bring, while as the same time providing a comfortable user experience, allowing you to get the most out of your computing time. With PC-BSD you can spend less time working to fix viruses or spyware and instead have the computer work for you.
SuSe

Xgl on SUSE 10.1 for Gnome and KDE with NVidia Graphics Cards

Post date: May 12, 2006, 13:05 Category: Desktop Views: 5223 Comments
Tutorial quote: Perhaps the most interesting eye-candy introduced to a mainstream Linux distribution is that of the Xgl 3D desktop environment. Naturally, when seen, it fosters the thought, "How can I do that on my own desktop?" I'll be honest with you, it's not quite as point-and-click as some of the other desktop niceties that we've discussed in the past, such as gdesklets or the gkrellm monitors. That in mind, if you're interested in getting Xgl installed and running on your desktop, you've found the right place. We'll take it a bit at a time and make sure we get you set up. First of all, I need to make sure that you are using this tutorial for a machine running either SUSE Linux 10.1 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10, and that you have an NVidia video card. With that, let's get going.
Linux

Rip DVDs in Linux the (Semi-)Easy Way

Post date: December 8, 2007, 14:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 4168 Comments
Tutorial quote: With its hacker-friendly aesthetic and open source mentality, you'd think a Linux desktop would be the best place to assert your digital rights—you know, make backup copies of your DVDs, convert them for iPods, that kind of thing.

And you'd be half right. There are plenty of programs that let you take control of your video discs, but they're only useful if you can make it through a maze of configuration menus, command line options, choices about bit rates and codecs, and the occasional confusing message about a missing library.

I've tried out a good number of DVD ripping and conversion programs, and I've made peace with one method, and one program, that gets the job done more often than not. It's not exactly one-click, but once your system is set up, you can drop in DVDs and back them up or convert them with relative ease.

Note on system differences: I set up my ripping/burning system on a Lenovo Thinkpad T61 running a brand-new installation of Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon). As with so many things Linux, packages and commands may vary based on your system. But for the most part, the tools I use in this walkthrough work across distributions and on both major desktop environments, GNOME and KDE.
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