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Search results for How Linux boots: Runlevels and init

Linux

How Linux boots: Runlevels and init

Post date: April 12, 2005, 23:04 Category: System Views: 2665 Comments
Tutorial quote: Identifying each stage of the boot process is invaluable in fixing boot problems and understanding the system as a whole.
Unix+clones

Create your own init.d scripts

Post date: November 11, 2007, 05:11 Category: System Views: 7532 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have a Linux executable that you would like to run as a daemon? Making your own init.d scripts can be a bit tricky, but I can help you out.

The directory /etc/init.d/ is a location on a Linux file system that contains scripts for changing init states.

For details on Linux run levels look here.

The run levels that are most important to us are 2, 3 and 5.

VERY basic sample init.d script (Replace italics respectively):
Ubuntu

Disable unnecessary services in Ubuntu - Boot-Up Manager

Post date: November 17, 2008, 11:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 8884 Comments
Tutorial quote: The startup scripts located in /etc/init.d are part of the bootup sequence of every Debian-like distro. Very often Ubuntu's documentation and guides have suggested - in order to deactivate init scripts - to change the permissions of the scripts in /etc/init.d, making them non-executable.
Debian

Debian RAID 1/5 system installer

Post date: May 28, 2005, 22:05 Category: Installing Views: 3085 Comments
Tutorial quote: Instructions for installing a very clean Debian GNU/Linux system that boots from RAID 1, and has RAID 1 or RAID 5 root and data filesystems.

The examples assume two identical harddrives, sda and sdb, on which after a small boot partition, 1 GB is used for swap, 25 GB is used for the root filesystem and everything else is for a big "data" partition that will hold non-system stuff.
Debian

Removing Unwanted Startup Debian Files or Services

Post date: January 5, 2007, 07:01 Category: System Views: 3454 Comments
Tutorial quote: Under Debian Linux ( and most other distros) startup files are stored in /etc/init.d/ directory and symbolic linked between /etc/rcX.d/ directory exists. Debian Linux (Red Hat/ Fedora) uses System V initialization scripts to start services at boot time from /etc/rcX.d/ directory. Debian Linux comes with different utilities to remove unwanted startup files.
SuSe

OpenSUSE 10.1 Installation Walkthrough with Screenshots

Post date: October 11, 2006, 16:10 Category: Installing Views: 8392 Comments
Tutorial quote: SUSE (formerly SuSE) is the leading distribution of Linux in Europe. SUSE Linux sets new standards for quality and ease of use, offering comprehensive packages of Linux-based applications. It is available in English, German, French, and Italian. The readers of Linux Journal voted SuSE Linux the Reader’s Choice for Best Distribution (1/99).
Linux

Linux stateful firewall design

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 2387 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows you how to use netfilter to set up a powerful Linux stateful firewall. All you need is an existing Linux system that's currently using a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel. A laptop, workstation, router or server with at a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel will do. You should be reasonably familiar with standard network terminology like IP addresses, source and destination port numbers, TCP, UDP and ICMP, etc. By the end of the tutorial, you'll understand how Linux stateful firewalls are put together and you'll have several example configurations to use in your own projects.
RedHat

My First Linux Server, Part 1

Post date: April 14, 2005, 22:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4415 Comments
Tutorial quote: Many small businesses are turning to Linux as way to swim against the tide of rising software costs. Are you thinking about diving into Linux for your small business? From the outside, Linux can appear to be a deep ocean of strange jargon in unchartered waters. Who has the time to wade through all that to save a few clams? With Linux, it's not a sink or swim proposition.

Linux is now a lot simpler than you may think. We can provide you with the easiest, simplest, no-problem process for installing Linux on a PC. After going through this simple installation process, you will have a basic machine that you can configure into any kind of server, workstation, or office desktop. Future articles in this My First Linux Server series will help you build productive, Linux-based servers and small office workstations.

The best choices for your first Linux machine are probably the popular Red Hat Linux or SUSE Linux, primarily because both are easy to install and configure. Additionally, these companies are sound choices for the home office or small business. Both vendors have specialized in Linux for many years and offer full corporate product lines supporting your expansion.
Linux

Installing Ubuntu Or Fedora From A Windows Or Linux System With UNetbootin

Post date: October 7, 2007, 09:10 Category: Installing Views: 3761 Comments
Tutorial quote: UNetbootin is a tool that allows you to install various Linux distributions (Ubuntu, Fedora, Mandriva, OpenSuSE, Debian, ArchLinux) from a Windows or a Linux desktop over the internet (i.e., you do not need to burn the Ubuntu, Fedora, ... CDs). Unlike the Ubuntu installation with Wubi, real partitions are created during the installation. In the end, you have a dual-boot system (Linux/Windows or Linux/Linux).
Linux

Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 1

Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: Hardware Views: 3573 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wireless hardware for Linux is a moving target. The wireless network adapter that worked fine with Linux yesterday may be released with an unsupported radio chipset today, and with no indication of the change. So buyer beware--always confirm the chipset before you buy. The good news is a lot of wireless adapters have native Linux support, and for those that don't, the NdisWrapper utility lets you use the Windows drivers on your Linux box.
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