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Search results for How To Compile A Kernel - Debian Etch

Debian

Upgrading Debian Etch (Stable) to Lenny (Testing)

Post date: October 3, 2008, 03:10 Category: System Views: 2856 Comments
Tutorial quote: Lenny is updated everyday with the most recent software available, however the software may not be stable which is what Debian is really all about. However if like me you can’t stand the thought of having outdated software, heres how to upgrade.
RedHat

Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4

Post date: July 18, 2005, 22:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 7484 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
Linux

Compiling Your Own Kernel

Post date: May 1, 2005, 17:05 Category: System Views: 2405 Comments
Tutorial quote: Once I decided to take the plunge and go for it, I realised it's not too hard at all. As long as you have a bootable floppy or CD to boot from if your new kernel doesn't work, you'll be OK.

For this simple guide, I'll assume that you use LILO as your boot manager.
Debian

Set Up A High-Availability Load Balancer With Perlbal/Heartbeat On Debian Etch

Post date: January 13, 2009, 12:01 Category: Installing Views: 3294 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with Perlbal and heartbeat on Debian Etch. The load balancer sits between the user and two (or more) backend Apache web servers that hold the same content. Not only does the load balancer distribute the requests to the two backend Apache servers, it also checks the health of the backend servers. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining backend server. In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using heartbeat, and if the master fails, the slave becomes the master, which means the users will not notice any disruption of the service. Perlbal is session-aware, which means you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions (such as forums, shopping carts, etc.).
Debian

High-Availability Load Balancer With HAProxy/Wackamole/Spread On Debian Etch

Post date: January 6, 2009, 12:01 Category: Installing Views: 3603 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy, Wackamole, and Spread on Debian Etch. The load balancer sits between the user and two (or more) backend Apache web servers that hold the same content. Not only does the load balancer distribute the requests to the two backend Apache servers, it also checks the health of the backend servers. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining backend server. In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using Wackamole and Spread, and if the master fails, the slave becomes the master, which means the users will not notice any disruption of the service. HAProxy is session-aware, which means you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions (such as forums, shopping carts, etc.).
Debian

Setting Up A High-Availability Load Balancer (With Failover and Session Support) With HAProxy/Keepalived On Debian Etch

Post date: October 29, 2007, 09:10 Category: Network Views: 4691 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy and keepalived on Debian Etch. The load balancer sits between the user and two (or more) backend Apache web servers that hold the same content. Not only does the load balancer distribute the requests to the two backend Apache servers, it also checks the health of the backend servers. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining backend server. In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using keepalived, and if the master fails, the slave becomes the master, which means the users will not notice any disruption of the service. HAProxy is session-aware, which means you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions (such as forums, shopping carts, etc.).
Debian

Setting Up A High-Availability Load Balancer (With Failover and Session Support) With HAProxy/Heartbeat On Debian Etch

Post date: November 7, 2007, 11:11 Category: Network Views: 4499 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy and heartbeat on Debian Etch. The load balancer sits between the user and two (or more) backend Apache web servers that hold the same content. Not only does the load balancer distribute the requests to the two backend Apache servers, it also checks the health of the backend servers. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining backend server. In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using heartbeat, and if the master fails, the slave becomes the master, which means the users will not notice any disruption of the service. HAProxy is session-aware, which means you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions (such as forums, shopping carts, etc.).
Ubuntu

Howto upgrade kernel(2.6.22-9-generic) in Feisty Fawn

Post date: August 5, 2007, 02:08 Category: Software Views: 3295 Comments
Tutorial quote: Currently Feisty Fawn users (7.04) using the generic kernel (which is 2.6.20-16-generic). This tutorial will explain howto upgrade you to kernel version 2.6.22-9-generic(as of 31JUL07).
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems Part II

Post date: January 6, 2006, 22:01 Category: Benchmarks Views: 4721 Comments
Tutorial quote: After the last article was published, I have received more than a dozen requests for a second filesystem benchmark using the 2.6 kernel. Since that time, I have converted entirely to XFS for every Linux machine I use, so I may be a bit bias regarding the XFS filesystem. I tried to keep the hardware roughly the same. Instead of a Western Digital 250GB and Promise ATA/100 controller, I am now am using a Seagate 400GB and Maxtor ATA/133 Promise controller. The physical machine remains the same, there is an additional 664MB of swap and I am now running Debian Etch. In the previous article, I was running Slackware 9.1 with custom compiled filesystem utilities. I've added a small section in the beginning that shows the filesystem creation and mount time, I've also added a graph showing these new benchmarks. After the first round of benchmarks, I received a sleuth of e-mails asking for the raw numbers. The numbers are now included in tables at the end of this e-mail for both the last and current set of benchmarks.
Ubuntu

Installing Xen 3.3 With Kernel 2.6.27 On Ubuntu 8.10 (x86_64)

Post date: February 24, 2009, 12:02 Category: Installing Views: 3127 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can install Xen 3.3 on an Ubuntu 8.10 host (dom0). Xen 3.3 is available from the Ubuntu 8.10 repositories, but the Ubuntu 8.10 kernels (2.6.27-x) are domU kernels, i.e., they work for Xen guests (domU), but not for the host (dom0). Therefore we need to build our own dom0 kernel. This guide explains how to do this with a 2.6.27 kernel.
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