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Search results for How To Compile A Kernel - The Debian (Sarge) Way

Debian

Sharing a printer to Windows XP clients with Samba and Cups

Post date: August 12, 2006, 18:08 Category: Network Views: 7583 Comments
Tutorial quote: Setting a printer in Debian Sarge from scratch and make it available for Windows XP clients on a LAN can be difficult, but using CUPS and samba it should be fairly straightforward if you have a supported printer. Here we will demonstrate how to do this.
Fedora

How To Run Fully-Virtualized Guests (HVM) With Xen 3.2 On Debian Lenny (x86_64)

Post date: March 8, 2009, 13:03 Category: Installing Views: 3902 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up fully-virtualized guests (HVM) with Xen 3.2 on a Debian Lenny x86_64 host system. HVM stands for HardwareVirtualMachine; to set up such guests, you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization (Intel VT or AMD-V). Hardware virtualization allows you to install unmodified guest systems (in contrast to paravirtualization where the guest kernel needs to be modified); that way you cannot only virtualize OpenSource operating systems like Linux and BSD, but also closed-source operating systems like Windows where you cannot modify the kernel.
Linux

Linux 2.6: Compiling and Installing

Post date: April 15, 2005, 22:04 Category: System Views: 2773 Comments
Tutorial quote: We'll look at the process of compiling and installing a new kernel safely, without overwriting the existing kernel.

You can install as many kernels as you like on a Linux system, and select the one you want to run at boot time. This makes it easy to test different kernels, and different kernel configurations, with particular sets of hardware or applications. The wise network admin always tests new kernels before running them on production machines.
RedHat

Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4

Post date: July 18, 2005, 22:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 7399 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
Linux

Compiling Your Own Kernel

Post date: May 1, 2005, 17:05 Category: System Views: 2356 Comments
Tutorial quote: Once I decided to take the plunge and go for it, I realised it's not too hard at all. As long as you have a bootable floppy or CD to boot from if your new kernel doesn't work, you'll be OK.

For this simple guide, I'll assume that you use LILO as your boot manager.
Debian

Linux virtual server on Debian Sarge

Post date: November 29, 2005, 21:11 Category: System Views: 3325 Comments
Tutorial quote: Linux-VServer allows you to create virtual private servers and security contexts which operate like a normal Linux server, but allow many independent servers to be run simultaneously in one box at full speed. All services, such as ssh, mail, Web, and databases, can be started on such a VPS, without modification, just like on any real server. Each virtual server has its own user account database and root password and doesn't interfere with other virtual servers.
Ubuntu

Howto upgrade kernel(2.6.22-9-generic) in Feisty Fawn

Post date: August 5, 2007, 02:08 Category: Software Views: 3248 Comments
Tutorial quote: Currently Feisty Fawn users (7.04) using the generic kernel (which is 2.6.20-16-generic). This tutorial will explain howto upgrade you to kernel version 2.6.22-9-generic(as of 31JUL07).
Ubuntu

Installing Xen 3.3 With Kernel 2.6.27 On Ubuntu 8.10 (x86_64)

Post date: February 24, 2009, 12:02 Category: Installing Views: 3081 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can install Xen 3.3 on an Ubuntu 8.10 host (dom0). Xen 3.3 is available from the Ubuntu 8.10 repositories, but the Ubuntu 8.10 kernels (2.6.27-x) are domU kernels, i.e., they work for Xen guests (domU), but not for the host (dom0). Therefore we need to build our own dom0 kernel. This guide explains how to do this with a 2.6.27 kernel.
Debian

Running Apache2 With PHP5 And PHP4 At The Same Time

Post date: February 28, 2006, 00:02 Category: Network Views: 4486 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to install and configure Apache2 with PHP5 and PHP4 enabled at the same time. Because it is not possible to run both PHP5 and PHP4 as Apache modules, we must run one of them as CGI, the other one as Apache module. In this document I will use PHP5 as Apache module and PHP4 as CGI, and I will describe the setup for the Linux distributions Debian Sarge (3.1) and Ubuntu 5.10 (Breezy Badger).
Debian

The Perfect Xen 3.0 Setup For Debian

Post date: April 1, 2006, 05:04 Category: System Views: 2656 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.1) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system.

Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
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