Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for How To Compile A Kernel - The SuSE Way

SuSe

A Fresh Approach - SUSE 10.1 package management

Post date: May 12, 2006, 13:05 Category: System Views: 4149 Comments
Tutorial quote: In SUSE 9.x and 10.0 the default package management software was the software management module and yast online update ( YOU ) in YaST2 and the susewatcher system tray applet. The susewatcher applet would faithfully report any security or system updates and would let you launch YOU to download and apply the updates. For third party software you could add online repositories to the installation sources module and ultimately you could manage all your software from the software management module, again in YaST2.
Debian

CD burning with a 2.6 kernel (IDE)

Post date: January 18, 2006, 00:01 Category: Multimedia Views: 3086 Comments
Tutorial quote: Under the 2.4 series kernel - to be able to use an IDE CD burner we were forced to use SCSI emulation (via the kernel module ide-scsi). Under the 2.6 series kernel - this is deprecated - we now use ide-cd.
Linux

Kernel parameters for enhance security

Post date: October 28, 2008, 05:10 Category: Security Views: 3190 Comments
Tutorial quote: The following list shows tunable kernel parameters you can use to secure your Linux server against attacks.

For each tunable kernel parameters you need to be add it to the /etc/sysctl.conf configuration file to make the change permanent after reboots
SuSe

Installing FreeNX Server on SUSE 10

Post date: December 27, 2005, 15:12 Category: Network Views: 7169 Comments
Tutorial quote: Not long ago, I reviewed SUSE Linux 10 and found that they had included the latest version of FreeNX (a free version of NoMachine's NX Server) on the installation media. I'd never really tried FreeNX at that point but had heard some good things about it, so I thought I'd give it a shot. Well, once it was installed and working I have to say I was immediately impressed by how simple it was to setup and how well (read: fast) it performed over a WAN connection. I was literally able to get my desktop at home from anywhere else in the world and get near-local speed. Normally, working on a remote system is alright until you need to type in any shape or form. There was almost no delay from the time I'd press a key to the time it would show up on the screen. This is what sold me on FreeNX and prompted me to offer to write a HOWTO on the topic. I was overwhelmed with email from our readers asking that I write it... so here we are!
Debian

Installing Xen 3.0 upon Debian Unstable, with a custom Kernel

Post date: December 29, 2005, 07:12 Category: System Views: 3526 Comments
Tutorial quote: Recently we demonstrated the process of installing a binary release of Xen 3.0 on Sarge, since the packages on Debian Unstable are not yet available for Xen 3.0 we're now going to look at installing it via the packages provided by Ralph Passgang. This also includes building a custom Xen kernel from source.

The advantage to building the Xen kernel from source is that you can add, or remove, drivers - so the kernel is utterly customised for your system.
Linux

Linux 2.6: Compiling and Installing

Post date: April 15, 2005, 22:04 Category: System Views: 2818 Comments
Tutorial quote: We'll look at the process of compiling and installing a new kernel safely, without overwriting the existing kernel.

You can install as many kernels as you like on a Linux system, and select the one you want to run at boot time. This makes it easy to test different kernels, and different kernel configurations, with particular sets of hardware or applications. The wise network admin always tests new kernels before running them on production machines.
RedHat

Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4

Post date: July 18, 2005, 22:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 7484 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
Linux

Compiling Your Own Kernel

Post date: May 1, 2005, 17:05 Category: System Views: 2403 Comments
Tutorial quote: Once I decided to take the plunge and go for it, I realised it's not too hard at all. As long as you have a bootable floppy or CD to boot from if your new kernel doesn't work, you'll be OK.

For this simple guide, I'll assume that you use LILO as your boot manager.
Ubuntu

Howto upgrade kernel(2.6.22-9-generic) in Feisty Fawn

Post date: August 5, 2007, 02:08 Category: Software Views: 3295 Comments
Tutorial quote: Currently Feisty Fawn users (7.04) using the generic kernel (which is 2.6.20-16-generic). This tutorial will explain howto upgrade you to kernel version 2.6.22-9-generic(as of 31JUL07).
OpenSUSE

SuSE 10.1 Installation Manual

Post date: October 28, 2006, 01:10 Category: Installing Views: 6544 Comments
Tutorial quote: A simple guide to openSUSE 10.1 installation with screenshots. Also explains the process of network install and has a section on post-install configuration.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink