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Search results for How To Compile A Kernel - The Ubuntu Way

Linux

Linux 2.6: Compiling and Installing

Post date: April 15, 2005, 22:04 Category: System Views: 2773 Comments
Tutorial quote: We'll look at the process of compiling and installing a new kernel safely, without overwriting the existing kernel.

You can install as many kernels as you like on a Linux system, and select the one you want to run at boot time. This makes it easy to test different kernels, and different kernel configurations, with particular sets of hardware or applications. The wise network admin always tests new kernels before running them on production machines.
Ubuntu

Installing Xen On An Ubuntu 8.04 Server From The Ubuntu Repositories

Post date: May 8, 2008, 10:05 Category: Installing Views: 3018 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on an Ubuntu Hardy Heron (Ubuntu 8.04) server system (i386). You can find all the software used here in the Ubuntu repositories, so no external files (apart from a fixed Ubuntu Xen kernel to enable networking for the virtual machines) or compilation are needed.
RedHat

Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4

Post date: July 18, 2005, 22:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 7397 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
Linux

Compiling Your Own Kernel

Post date: May 1, 2005, 17:05 Category: System Views: 2356 Comments
Tutorial quote: Once I decided to take the plunge and go for it, I realised it's not too hard at all. As long as you have a bootable floppy or CD to boot from if your new kernel doesn't work, you'll be OK.

For this simple guide, I'll assume that you use LILO as your boot manager.
Ubuntu

Howto upgrade kernel(2.6.22-9-generic) in Feisty Fawn

Post date: August 5, 2007, 02:08 Category: Software Views: 3248 Comments
Tutorial quote: Currently Feisty Fawn users (7.04) using the generic kernel (which is 2.6.20-16-generic). This tutorial will explain howto upgrade you to kernel version 2.6.22-9-generic(as of 31JUL07).
Debian

Building Kernel Modules With Module-Assistant On Debian Lenny

Post date: January 26, 2010, 12:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3191 Comments
Tutorial quote: module-assistant is a tool for building Debian kernel modules from source, without having to rebuild the whole kernel. It fetches module-source packages that have been prepared for the Debian distribution via apt and produces .deb packages. This tutorial shows how to use module-assistant in command-line mode and in interactive mode.
Linux

Building a GameCube Linux Kernel

Post date: January 23, 2006, 15:01 Category: System Views: 2409 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains briefly the necessary steps to produce a Linux kernel suitable for the GameCube, using a Linux PC.
OpenSUSE

Linux Kernel Magic SysRq keys in openSUSE for crash recovery

Post date: September 28, 2008, 17:09 Category: System Views: 3325 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux Kernel offers you something that allows you to recover your system from a crash or at the least lets you to perform a proper shutdown using the Magic SysRq Keys. The magic SysRq key is a select key combination in the Linux kernel which allows the user to perform various low level commands regardless of the system’s state using the SysRq key. It is often used to recover from freezes, or to reboot a computer without corrupting the filesystem.
Debian

OpenVZ On Debian Etch For Webservers

Post date: December 26, 2006, 21:12 Category: System Views: 3234 Comments
Tutorial quote: Virtualization is a good practice for servers, since it makes things more secure, scalable, replacable, and replicable, all this at the cost of little added complexity. This guide was written during an install of a Supermicro machine with two dual-core opterons (64-bit), two identical disks (for RAID) and a load of memory. Why OpenVZ and not XEN or the recent KVM kernel module? Well, XEN is not very stable for 64-bit architectures (yet), and it comes with quite a bit of overhead (every VM runs its own kernel) due to its complexity. KVM is very simple but restricts you to run a kernel as one process, so the VM cannot benefit from multi core systems.
Gentoo

Logitech quickcam on 2.6.x kernel

Post date: April 25, 2005, 23:04 Category: Hardware Views: 3107 Comments
Tutorial quote: This short tutorial explains how to get your Logitech Quickcam to work under 2.6.x kernel.
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