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Search results for How To Create A Local Debian/Ubuntu Mirror With apt-mirror

Debian

How To Create A Local Debian/Ubuntu Mirror With apt-mirror

Post date: January 4, 2007, 20:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3357 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to create a Debian/Ubuntu mirror for your local network with the tool apt-mirror. Having a local Debian/Ubuntu mirror is good if you have to install multiple systems in your local network because then all needed packages can be downloaded over the fast LAN connection, thus saving your internet bandwidth.
Debian

Howto Select Fastest Mirror in Debian

Post date: May 18, 2008, 11:05 Category: Network Views: 2956 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you want to select Fastest Mirror in Debian follow this tutorial and this is very helpful if you want to download and install your debian packages,Updates .netselect-apt automatically creates a sources.list file for using with apt for the specified distribution by downloading the list of Debian mirrors using wget and choosing the fastest servers (both US and non-US) using netselect. The output file is written to OUTFILE.
CentOS

Creating A Local Yum Repository (CentOS)

Post date: June 16, 2007, 22:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 5052 Comments
Tutorial quote: Sometimes it can be handy to set up your own repository to prevent from downloading the remote repository over and over again. This tutorial shows how to create a CentOS mirror for your local network. If you have to install multiple systems in your local network then all needed packages can be downloaded over the fast LAN connection, thus saving your internet bandwidth.
Debian

Installing A Web, Email, MySQL DB Cluster (Mirror) On Debian 5 With ISPConfig 3

Post date: August 11, 2010, 23:08 Category: Installing Views: 3510 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes the installation of a clustered web, email, database and DNS server to be used for redundancy, high availability and load balancing on Debian 5 with the ISPConfig 3 control panel. GlusterFS will be used to mirror the data between the servers and ISPConfig for mirroring the configuration files. I will use a setup of two servers here for demonstration purposes but the setup can scale to a higher number of servers with only minor modifications in the GlusterFS configuration files.
Debian

Setting up a local web server in Debian Linux

Post date: January 21, 2006, 06:01 Category: Network Views: 2664 Comments
Tutorial quote: Any web developer, designer, or webmaster can benefit from having a local web server. Even if that developer has no interest in securing and maintaining the server his or her websites live on, a local server can act as a convenient mirror for testing updates, trying new designs, and other general sand-boxing activities.

Web developers whose hosts utilize the popular LAMP platform (Linux + Apache + MySQL + PHP) are frequently hit with a dilemma. Since understanding Linux is not a prerequisite for website administrators, many of them lack the knowledge necessary for setting up a LAMP server from scratch (or at least they may think so). But thanks to the improved package management on Linux distributions like Debian, installing a functional web server is not nearly the chore it was just a couple years ago.
Linux

Entering A Safe Mirror When Logging In With Unionfs And Chroot

Post date: June 28, 2007, 00:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2577 Comments
Tutorial quote: When reading a hint on the website of LinuxFromScratch I discovered the special capabilities of unionfs, specially in combination with chroot. Later I read a HowTo on a wikiwebsite of Gentoo, about entering a chrooted home directory when using a special script as shell. Combining these two brings me to using a chrooted environment, which you enter when logging in as a special user. This environment is an exact copy (mirror) of the system you are working on. Because you are in safe copy of the real system, you can do whatever you like, it will never change the system, everything stays inside the cache (the readwrite branch).
SuSe

Setting up yum on SUSE LINUX 10.0

Post date: October 16, 2005, 16:10 Category: System Views: 5388 Comments
Tutorial quote: Why should I use yum and not yast? Well, yast is nice, but has some disadvantages: It can#t check for gpg keys, you have to trust the mirrors you add. And, speaking about mirrors, yast has no real mirror management for one source. Especially in these times the most and best known SUSE mirrors are very slow or just closed down, so you have to add other sources in yast. But yast needs your clicks when a mirror is not reachable, and if you enter several sources just as mirrors, it checks every single source - that takes quite a long time!
A last reason (which is not important know because SUSE LINUX has a ugly workaround) is that yast is not able to handle packages for different architectures - it can only install packages for one architecture.
Ubuntu

How to use apt-p2p For Faster Upgrades From Ubuntu 8.10 to 9.04

Post date: April 20, 2009, 07:04 Category: System Views: 3208 Comments
Tutorial quote: apt-p2p is a p2p proxy for apt dowloads, it will act as a proxy between apt requests and a repository server, downloading any request files from peers (if possible), else will fallback to direct HTTP download. In general, apt-p2p save bandwidth, use limited cpu and memory resources and reduce congestion on the ubuntu mirrors.apt-p2p will get the request files from peers, therefore, it will avoid the congestion on the ubuntu mirrors.

Debian

Rescuing systems using the Debian snapshot server

Post date: September 18, 2006, 14:09 Category: System Views: 5212 Comments
Tutorial quote: One of the unofficial Debian project resources which doesn't get the attention it deserves is the Debian Snapshot site. The site contains a mirror of old Debian packages, which can be very useful for system recovery.

In most normal cases you won't ever need to use it, unless you're wanting to compare two different package versions to see changes, or do other non-standard things. However when you do need to use it you'll learn what a big lifesaver it is!

The biggest use for the site, for me, has been for recovering from broken package updates. Whilst these are rare in the Debian Stable and Testing releases they can be an issue when running Debian unstable.
Debian

An apt-get primer

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: System Views: 2684 Comments
Tutorial quote: If any single program defines the Debian Linux project, that program is apt-get. apt-get is Debian's main tool for installing and removing software. Working with the .deb package format, apt-get offers sophisticated package management that few Red Hat Package Manager RPM-based distributions can match.

Besides the convenience, an advantage of apt-get is that it reduces the chances of falling into dependency hell, that limbo where software installation fails for lack of another piece of software, whose installation fails for lack of another piece of software, and so on. If you know how Debian's archive system works, and how to choose the sources that apt-get uses, and use a few precautions in your upgrades, then the chances are that dependency problems will never bedevil you. Should you descend into dependency hell anyway, apt-get offers useful tools for climbing out of it.
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