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Search results for How To Enable NTFS Write Support (ntfs-3g) On Mandriva 2007 Spring

Mandriva

Virtual Users/Domains With Postfix/Courier/MySQL/SquirrelMail (Mandriva 2009.0)

Post date: October 23, 2008, 12:10 Category: Installing Views: 3618 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install a Postfix mail server that is based on virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database. I will also demonstrate the installation and configuration of Courier (Courier-POP3, Courier-IMAP), so that Courier can authenticate against the same MySQL database used by Postfix. The resulting Postfix server is capable of SMTP-AUTH and TLS and quota. Passwords are stored in encrypted form in the database. In addition to that, this tutorial covers the installation of Amavisd, SpamAssassin and ClamAV so that emails will be scanned for spam and viruses. I will also show how to install SquirrelMail as a webmail interface so that users can read and send emails and change their passwords.
SuSe

Correct Multimedia Support in SUSE Linux 9.2

Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 3887 Comments
Tutorial quote: SUSE Linux is one of the better desktop Linux distributions on the market today, providing a functional and aesthetically pleasing environment for the new Linux user as well as seasoned veterans. On thing that puzzles many users is the lack of proper multimedia support in SUSE. The developers have basically crippled it from playing virtually all types of multimedia content that's common on the Internet today. This can be a frustrating dilema for new users, so I have written a short HOWTO to help you get everything in order on your new desktop.

It should be noted that you don't necessarily need to install apt to fix the multimedia problem on SUSE, but it's probably the most beneficial way to get it done. You can easily remove the offending packages and install new ones not provided by SUSE, but by using apt, you'll get the benefit of having a much larger package base available to you... something that SUSE has suffered from for a very long time. With or without apt, let's get things going with this HOWTO.
Debian

Setting Up A PXE Install Server For Multiple Linux Distributions On Debian Lenny

Post date: May 26, 2009, 10:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 7708 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up a PXE (short for preboot execution environment) install server on Debian Lenny. A PXE install server allows your client computers to boot and install a Linux distribution over the network, without the need of burning Linux iso images onto a CD/DVD, boot floppy images, etc. This is handy if your client computers don't have CD or floppy drives, or if you want to set up multiple computers at the same time (e.g. in a large enterprise), or simply because you want to save the money for the CDs/DVDs. In this article I show how to configure a PXE server that allows you to boot multiple distributions (i386 and x86_64): Debian Lenny, Ubuntu 9.04, Fedora 10, CentOS 5.3, OpenSuSE 11.1, and Mandriva 2009.1.
Linux

Creating a safe directory with PAM and Encfs

Post date: June 7, 2006, 20:06 Category: Security Views: 3833 Comments
Tutorial quote: Now, in my network (and others) the credentials provided at login could (and should) be used by those programs. How can you retrieve these credentials, providing enough security?
With a the PAM modules pam_script it's possible to store the password in a file, which will be used by fusemb and mount.cifs to read the password from.

To achieve security, one could make the user logging in owner and deny read/write for anybody else. Remove this file when the user ends his/her session.
This is enough, for runtime. But I was wondering, but what if the system crashes, and the file with the credentials remains on the harddrive? Anybody who is able to mount this harddrive with for example a lifecd, can read this file!

That's why I was looking for a way to encrypt this file.

With encfs this is very possible! At run time it gives an interface to encrypted files and directories, which does only exist at runtime! When the system is not running, there are only encrypted files, useless when you do not know the key to it. And this key is exactly the (encrypted) password! That's why I've chosen for a combination of PAM and Encfs.
Linux

Grub From the Ground Up

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: Software Views: 3192 Comments
Tutorial quote: Grub is a world-class boot loader with insufficient documentation. In many ways it blows the doors of LILO. For instance, it's MUCH easier to use Knoppix to rebuild a grub boot loader than to rebuild a LILO boot loader. However, until you're comfortable with grub, it might seem just the opposite. All too often grub dumps you at a grub> prompt with no hint of what you should do. You might have heard that a successful reboot is just three commands away, but which commands? The state of grub's documentation is such that you can't figure it out unless you already know grub.

That catch 22 is the very purpose of this document. This document will to give you enough grub expertise that you can create a grub boot floppy on a working machine with grub installed (not necessarily as the bootloader, just installed), and use that floppy to bust back into a Linux machine with a blown bootloader, and then use that floppy to actually install grub as the bootloader.

This document does not discuss using grub to boot or dual boot Windows, mach, BSD, or other non-Linux operating systems. I might write on that subject later. But in the meantime, once you're familiar with the principles and practices of grub, given some study of existing documentation you'll probably be able to use grub to boot non-Linux operating systems.
Unix+clones

Easy Automated Snapshot-Style Backups with Linux and Rsync

Post date: February 1, 2006, 00:02 Category: Software Views: 3547 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes a method for generating automatic rotating "snapshot"-style backups on a Unix-based system, with specific examples drawn from the author's GNU/Linux experience. Snapshot backups are a feature of some high-end industrial file servers; they create the illusion of multiple, full backups per day without the space or processing overhead. All of the snapshots are read-only, and are accessible directly by users as special system directories. It is often possible to store several hours, days, and even weeks' worth of snapshots with slightly more than 2x storage. This method, while not as space-efficient as some of the proprietary technologies (which, using special copy-on-write filesystems, can operate on slightly more than 1x storage), makes use of only standard file utilities and the common rsync program, which is installed by default on most Linux distributions. Properly configured, the method can also protect against hard disk failure, root compromises, or even back up a network of heterogeneous desktops automatically.
Debian

Supplying routing information using DHCP

Post date: December 10, 2006, 09:12 Category: Network Views: 3471 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article describes how to use DHCP to supply information about static routes to the clients on your network. You may want to do this if you have two or more local networks with routers between them. The DHCP software doesn't support this out-of-the-box, but it can be configured to do so without too much effort.
Ubuntu

SMPlayer - Nice Frontend for MPlayer

Post date: June 11, 2007, 23:06 Category: Software Views: 4715 Comments
Tutorial quote: SMPlayer intends to be a complete front-end for MPlayer, from basic features like playing videos, DVDs, and VCDs to
more advanced features like support for MPlayer filters and more.
Ubuntu

Multimedia Support in Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

Post date: November 2, 2008, 05:11 Category: Multimedia Views: 3767 Comments
Tutorial quote: Often the case (and especially) when it comes out a new version of Ubuntu, that repositories from which we tend to download software are highly saturated. If you want to download and install the software more quickly, we will have to modify the list of repositories.
OSX

VNC control of a Mac under OS X 10.4

Post date: December 10, 2005, 08:12 Category: Network Views: 6475 Comments
Tutorial quote: VNC support is built right into Tiger. This means you can remote control you mac from an another mac a PC or even you Palm or Blackberry.

However the functionality is a bit hidden. Here are the simple steps to set it up. Remember this is TIGER not Panther.
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