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Unix+clones

Python Programming for Beginners

Post date: September 19, 2006, 09:09 Category: Programming Views: 44096 Comments
Tutorial quote: Despite what assembly code and C coders might tell us, high-level languages do have their place in every programmer's toolbox, and some of them are much more than a computer-science curiosity. Out of the many high-level languages we can choose from today, Python seems to be the most interesting for those who want to learn something new and do real work at the same time. Its no-nonsense implementation of object-oriented programming and its clean and easy-to-understand syntax make it a language that is fun to learn and use, which is not something we can say about most other languages.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to write applications that use command-line options, read and write to pipes, access environment variables, handle interrupts, read from and write to files, create temporary files and write to system logs. In other words, you will find recipes for writing real applications instead of the old boring Hello, World! stuff.
Ubuntu

QuickStart, The Swiss Army Knife For Ubuntu 8.04 Desktop

Post date: August 17, 2008, 10:08 Category: Desktop Views: 3225 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this article I will show how to install and use QuickStart on an Ubuntu 8.04 desktop. QuickStart is like a Swiss army knife, it allows you to do various things on your Ubuntu desktop: creating and restoring backups, running scheduled backups, backing up configuration files, installing some common applications, installing DVD codecs, deleting unnecessary files, etc.
Linux

Comprehensive Linux System Services List: Explanation and Recommendation

Post date: December 17, 2007, 06:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3566 Comments
Tutorial quote: Linux services are basically programs that start at boot time to provide certain features and services (Apache, the web server for example). After installation, every Linux distribution provides a list of enabled services. However, you might not need some of these services or you might need others that are not enabled by default. Having only the services you need running will make your system faster, more stable and secure. So the first thing you need to do after installing a Linux distribution is to manually edit the list of enabled services. Unfortunately, some services don’t provide a description, others provide a description that’s not understandable so you might end-up disabling a vital system service just because you didn’t know what it did and you thought you didn’t need it.
Ubuntu

3D Desktop (Beryl and Xgl) on Ubuntu Edgy Eft with ATI card.

Post date: November 1, 2006, 03:11 Category: Installing Views: 7966 Comments
Tutorial quote: The goal of this guide is to make it as easy as possible for everyone to install a 3D Desktop on Ubuntu Linux (Edgy Eft) with Beryl and Xgl, there will be no use of the terminal in this guide so everyone should be able to follow this guide and install a 3D Desktop on there very own and brand new installation of Ubuntu Edgy Eft. With alot of screenshots.
Linux

Building an LDAP Server on Linux, Part 2

Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 3636 Comments
Tutorial quote: Welcome back! In Part 1 we learned basic concepts of LDAP and the uses for an LDAP server. Today we'll install and configure an OpenLDAP directory.

A quick note before we get started: this is LDAP 101. We are not installing any kind of encryption or strong authentication; we'll get to that in part 3. In my experience, learning LDAP in small chunks works best. (Then again, perhaps I'm just a bit dim.) So sit back, strap in, and keep your fingers away from the training wheels.

"The wise sysadmin will consult the documentation for their distro; it's quite possible that OpenLDAP will be packaged and ready to go in a pleasing manner (or ready to go in an odd manner--you never know). I'm all for easy--if your particular distribution provides an easy way, use it. RPMs can also be obtained from rpmfind.net, which thoughtfully lists all the required additional packages.

"Debian of course goes its own merry way. apt-get does the job just fine; the tricky bit is finding out the package names. Debian users want ldap-utils; slapd, which is OpenLDAP; and libdb4.1, to get the Sleepycat DB. These three components are enough to get you up and running. apt-get will walk you through a minimal configuration and will automatically start up slapd, the LDAP server daemon.
Debian

Using the 'snort' Intrusion Detection System

Post date: December 27, 2005, 15:12 Category: Security Views: 4731 Comments
Tutorial quote: Snort is the leading open source Network Intrusion Detection System and is a valuable addition to the security framework at any site. Even if you are employing lots of preventative measures, such as firewalling, patching, etc., a detection system can give you an assurance that your defences truly are effective, or if not, will give you valuable information about what you need to improve.

Fortunately, there is a good set of snort packages for Debian which takes a lot of the tedious work out of building a useful Network Intrusion Detection System. Before we start on installation, we should review a few details about the networking satack that you're going to need to make sense of the alerts snort will generate. Impatient readers and those who are familiar with the TCP/IP suite of protocols may do now skip to the bit that says Stand alone snort.
Linux

Creating a safe directory with PAM and Encfs

Post date: June 7, 2006, 20:06 Category: Security Views: 3176 Comments
Tutorial quote: Now, in my network (and others) the credentials provided at login could (and should) be used by those programs. How can you retrieve these credentials, providing enough security?
With a the PAM modules pam_script it's possible to store the password in a file, which will be used by fusemb and mount.cifs to read the password from.

To achieve security, one could make the user logging in owner and deny read/write for anybody else. Remove this file when the user ends his/her session.
This is enough, for runtime. But I was wondering, but what if the system crashes, and the file with the credentials remains on the harddrive? Anybody who is able to mount this harddrive with for example a lifecd, can read this file!

That's why I was looking for a way to encrypt this file.

With encfs this is very possible! At run time it gives an interface to encrypted files and directories, which does only exist at runtime! When the system is not running, there are only encrypted files, useless when you do not know the key to it. And this key is exactly the (encrypted) password! That's why I've chosen for a combination of PAM and Encfs.
Ubuntu

KVM Guest Management With Virt-Manager On Ubuntu 8.10

Post date: February 10, 2009, 12:02 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4187 Comments
Tutorial quote: Virt-Manager (Virtual Machine Manager) is a graphical interface for managing KVM and Xen guests on the local and also on remote systems. You can use it to start, stop, pause, create, and delete guests, and you can connect to the guests using the graphical console. This guide shows how you can use it to manage KVM guests on an Ubuntu 8.10 desktop.
Debian

Chrooting Apache2 With mod_chroot On Debian Lenny

Post date: April 15, 2010, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 2582 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to set up mod_chroot with Apache2 on a Debian Lenny system. With mod_chroot, you can run Apache2 in a secure chroot environment and make your server less vulnerable to break-in attempts that try to exploit vulnerabilities in Apache2 or your installed web applications.
Ubuntu

Installing Google Android SDK 1.0 On Ubuntu 8.04 Desktop

Post date: September 28, 2008, 10:09 Category: Desktop Views: 2980 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install the Google Android SDK 1.0 on an Ubuntu 8.04 desktop. With this stable release of the Android SDK, you can now develop applications for Android smartphones (like T-Mobile's G1) and offer them on the Android Market.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink