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Ubuntu

How To Install VMware Server On A Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake) System

Post date: July 16, 2006, 16:07 Category: Software Views: 4088 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install the free VMware Server (version 1.0.0) on a Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake) system.

VMware has just released version 1.0.0 of its free VMware Server. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems ("virtual machines") such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. This has the benefit that you can run multiple operating systems on the same hardware which saves a lot of money, and you can move virtual machines from one VMware Server to the next one (or to a system that has the VMware Player which is also free). In this article we use Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake) as the host operating system.

I want to say first that this is not the only way of setting up such a system. There are many ways of achieving this goal but this is the way I take. I do not issue any guarantee that this will work for you!
Linux

How to configure Linux as Internet Gateway for small office

Post date: February 17, 2009, 08:02 Category: Network Views: 6597 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up network-address-translation (NAT) on a Linux system with iptables rules so that the system can act as a gateway and provide internet access to multiple hosts on a local network using a single public IP address. This is achieved by rewriting the source and/or destination addresses of IP packets as they pass through the NAT system.
Debian

How To Set Up Software RAID1 On A Running System (Incl. GRUB Configuration) (Debian Etch)

Post date: November 29, 2007, 11:11 Category: Installing Views: 3866 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to set up software RAID1 on an already running Debian Etch system. The GRUB bootloader will be configured in such a way that the system will still be able to boot if one of the hard drives fails (no matter which one).
Debian

How To Set Up Software RAID1 On A Running LVM System (Debian Squeeze)

Post date: June 15, 2011, 09:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3024 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to set up software RAID1 on an already running LVM system (Debian Squeeze). The GRUB2 bootloader will be configured in such a way that the system will still be able to boot if one of the hard drives fails (no matter which one).
Debian

Giving your Xen instances a working X setup

Post date: January 3, 2006, 04:01 Category: Software Views: 3363 Comments
Tutorial quote: Xen, the virtualisation system, is a great tool for running fresh copies of an operating system. However it doesn't allow you to run X11 programs. Here we can fix that with the help of VNC.
Debian

Using the 'snort' Intrusion Detection System

Post date: December 27, 2005, 15:12 Category: Security Views: 5565 Comments
Tutorial quote: Snort is the leading open source Network Intrusion Detection System and is a valuable addition to the security framework at any site. Even if you are employing lots of preventative measures, such as firewalling, patching, etc., a detection system can give you an assurance that your defences truly are effective, or if not, will give you valuable information about what you need to improve.

Fortunately, there is a good set of snort packages for Debian which takes a lot of the tedious work out of building a useful Network Intrusion Detection System. Before we start on installation, we should review a few details about the networking satack that you're going to need to make sense of the alerts snort will generate. Impatient readers and those who are familiar with the TCP/IP suite of protocols may do now skip to the bit that says Stand alone snort.
Linux

The PartImage Handbook

Post date: May 21, 2005, 15:05 Category: Software Views: 3246 Comments
Tutorial quote: - Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX partition imaging utility: it saves partitions formatted using the Ext2FS (the linux standard), ReiserFS (a new journaled and powerful file system), JFS IBM journaled file systems from AIX, NTFS (Windows NT File System), FAT16/32 (DOS & Windows file systems), or HPFS (OS/2 file system) file system formats to an image file. Only used blocks are copied. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable media (ZIP for example), or burned on a CD-R ...

- This allows the user to save a full Linux/Windows system, with a single operation. When problems occur (viruses, crash, error, ...), you just have to restore, and after several minutes, all your system is restored (boot, files, ...), and fully working.

- This is very useful when installing the same software on many machines: just install one of them, create an image, and then restore the image on all other machines. After the first one, each subsequent installation can be made automaticaly, and only requires a few minutes.
OpenSUSE

Write your own kernel module and insert it into running kernel

Post date: January 12, 2009, 08:01 Category: Programming Views: 5690 Comments
Tutorial quote: So, you want to write a kernel module. You know C, you've written a few normal programs to run as processes, and now you want to get to where the real action is, to where a single wild pointer can wipe out your file system and a core dump means a reboot.

kernel Modules are pieces of code that can be loaded and unloaded into the kernel upon demand. They extend the functionality of the kernel without the need to reboot the system. For example, one type of module is the device driver, which allows the kernel to access hardware connected to the system.
Debian

How To Set Up Software RAID1 On A Running LVM System (Incl. GRUB Configuration) (Debian Etch)

Post date: March 25, 2008, 10:03 Category: System Views: 4061 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to set up software RAID1 on an already running LVM system (Debian Etch). The GRUB bootloader will be configured in such a way that the system will still be able to boot if one of the hard drives fails (no matter which one).
OpenBSD

Apache - Serving up the Web

Post date: April 11, 2006, 22:04 Category: Network Views: 8909 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Apache Web Server is installed as part of the OpenBSD base system. This guide will help you configure the web server: (Apache 1.3.12 is released with OpenBSD 2.7 and 1.3.9 with OpenBSD 2.6)

To see how configurable the Apache/OpenBSD combination is we also look at allowing administrators to remotely review the server's status, we setup the system so we allow users on our system to have their own personal web-space. Of course, for the security counscious you probably want to turn some of these things off after you get things up and running.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink