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Search results for How To Resize ext3 Partitions Without Losing Data

Unix+clones

Remote backup using ssh, tar and cron

Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2882 Comments
Tutorial quote: Are you looking for a solution to backup your data to a remote location? While a solid backup solution such as Arkeia or TSM from IBM are nice from an enterprise point of view, simpler solutions are available from a home user's perspective. I will walk you through on you how you can backup your data to a remote server, using the default tools available on all linux systems. In a nutshell, we will use ssh capabilities to allow a cron job to transfer a tarball from you local machine to a remote machine.

For the purpose of this tutorial, the local machine will be called “localmachine” (running slackware) and the remote server will be called “remoteserver” (slackware as well). The user will be joe (me). You will have to substitute those 3 with your own machines names and user.
Unix+clones

Installing and securing Squid

Post date: March 13, 2006, 15:03 Category: Software Views: 4797 Comments
Tutorial quote: Squid is a high-performance proxy caching server for web clients, supporting FTP, gopher, and HTTP data objects. Unlike traditional caching software, Squid handles all requests in a single, non-blocking, I/O-driven process. Squid keeps meta data and especially hot objects cached in RAM, caches DNS lookups, supports non-blocking DNS lookups, and implements negative caching of failed requests. Squid supports SSL, extensive access controls, and full request logging. By using the lightweight Internet Cache Protocol, Squid caches can be arranged in a hierarchy or mesh for additional bandwidth savings.

After the installation and base configuration of squid we will add another layer of security by chrooting it.
Debian

Striping Across Four Storage Nodes With GlusterFS On Debian Lenny

Post date: July 12, 2009, 10:07 Category: Installing Views: 3253 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to do data striping (segmentation of logically sequential data, such as a single file, so that segments can be assigned to multiple physical devices in a round-robin fashion and thus written concurrently) across four single storage servers (running Debian Lenny) with GlusterFS. The client system (Debian Lenny as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86-64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Ubuntu

Database Server With postgresql and pgadmin3 in Ubuntu

Post date: April 20, 2008, 18:04 Category: Software Views: 3521 Comments
Tutorial quote: PostgreSQL is a powerful, open source relational database system. It has more than 15 years of active development and a proven architecture that has earned it a strong reputation for reliability, data integrity, and correctness. It runs on all major operating systems, including Linux, UNIX (AIX, BSD,HP-UX, SGI IRIX, Mac OS X, Solaris, Tru64), and Windows. It is fully ACID compliant, has full support for foreign keys, joins, views, triggers, and stored procedures (in multiple languages). It includes
most SQL92 and SQL99 data types, including INTEGER, NUMERIC, BOOLEAN, CHAR, VARCHAR, DATE, INTERVAL, and
TIMESTAMP. It also supports storage of binary large objects, including pictures, sounds, or video. It has native programming interfaces for C/C++, Java, .Net, Perl, Python, Ruby, Tcl, ODBC, among others.

Linux

Sawing Linux Logs with Simple Tools

Post date: April 14, 2005, 12:04 Category: Security Views: 2728 Comments
Tutorial quote: So there you are with all of your Linux servers humming along happily. You have tested, tweaked, and configured until they are performing at their peak of perfection. Users are hardly whining at all. Life is good. You may relax and indulge in some nice, relaxing rounds of TuxKart. After all, you earned it.

Except for one little remaining chore: monitoring your log files. [insert horrible alarming music of your choice here.] You're conscientious, so you know you can't just ignore the logs until there's a problem, especially for public services like Web and mail. Somewhere up in the pointy-haired suites, they may even be plotting to require you to track and analyze all sorts of server statistics.

Not to worry, for there are many ways to implement data reduction, which is what log parsing is all about. You want to slice and dice your logs to present only the data you're interested in viewing. Unless you wish to devote your entire life to manually analyzing log files. Even if you only pay attention to logfiles when you're debugging a problem, having some tools to weed out the noise is helpful.
Linux

Setting Up Subversion for One or Multiple Projects

Post date: April 13, 2005, 00:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3962 Comments
Tutorial quote: Deploying a secure and manageable Subversion installation that uses Apache 2.0 as a central authentication checkpoint and SSL for data integrity and confidentiality.
Gentoo

Monitoring all filesystem modifications

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Security Views: 3643 Comments
Tutorial quote: After loading this kernel module you can monitor all file system alterations by simply typing: cat /dev/fsysmon

It's original purpose was to feed a daemon with data but nevertheless I found it to be even more useful as a standalone project.
Linux

How to restore deleted file on ext2

Post date: December 15, 2006, 19:12 Category: System Views: 3030 Comments
Tutorial quote: This text describes the steps needed do recover the data of a file that was recently deleted.
Linux

Change your Network card MAC ( Media Access Control) address Using macchanger

Post date: January 4, 2007, 20:01 Category: Network Views: 3190 Comments
Tutorial quote: Media Access Control address, a hardware address that uniquely identifies each node of a network. In IEEE 802 networks, the Data Link Control (DLC) layer of the OSI Reference Model is divided into two sublayers: the Logical Link Control (LLC) layer and the Media Access Control (MAC) layer. The MAC layer interfaces directly with the network medium.Consequently, each different type of network medium requires a different MAC layer. On networks that do not conform to the IEEE 802 standards but do conform to the OSI Reference Model, the node address is called the Data Link Control (DLC) address.
Solaris

Configuring networking

Post date: April 13, 2005, 03:04 Category: Network Views: 5279 Comments
Tutorial quote: Networking information in Solaris is stored in text files. Configuration is done by filling in the appriopriate data to these files and invoking specific commands in a terminal window.
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