Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for How To Search For Missing Packages With apt-file On Debian and Ubuntu

Debian

Building Kernel Modules With Module-Assistant On Debian Lenny

Post date: January 26, 2010, 12:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3191 Comments
Tutorial quote: module-assistant is a tool for building Debian kernel modules from source, without having to rebuild the whole kernel. It fetches module-source packages that have been prepared for the Debian distribution via apt and produces .deb packages. This tutorial shows how to use module-assistant in command-line mode and in interactive mode.
Debian

Version Control For Your /etc Directory With etckeeper/Bazaar On Debian Squeeze

Post date: July 17, 2011, 18:07 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2434 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how you can store the contents of your /etc directory in a version control system (VCS) with the help of etckeeper on Debian Squeeze. etckeeper hooks into Debian's package manager apt so that whenever you install/remove a package with apt, etckeeper will commit all changes to the /etc directory to your VCS; it also tracks file metadata such as permissions which is important for files such as /etc/shadow. Using etckeeper, you can go back to a previous version of /etc if an update has overwritten valuable configuration files. Not only will etckeeper track apt's changes to /etc, it will also do a daily auto-commit so that your manual changes go to VCS as well; in addition to that, you can do commits at any time manually.
Debian

Cleaning up a Debian GNU/Linux system

Post date: November 25, 2006, 08:11 Category: System Views: 3366 Comments
Tutorial quote: You arrive at a Debian GNU/Linux server which has some history of neglection. Let's suppose someone else neglected it but if your new-year resolution is to stop neglecting your beloved server, this applies as well.

One form of neglection is to install, install, install and never un-install any package. The common utility to perform installation and un-installation of packages is apt-get which adds to the problem because it doesn't have automatic removal of non-needed dependences.

That means that when phpMyAdmin was installed it also installed Apache, PHP and ton of other packages. phpMyAdmin was removed when it was no longer needed but Apache, PHP and the ton of packages remain there.

Aptitude to the rescue.
Linux

Apt-For-RPM-Howto

Post date: April 12, 2005, 16:04 Category: System Views: 2669 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this short tutorial I will show how to install and use Debian's package manager apt on various rpm-based distributions like Fedora, Mandrake (or Mandriva, they changed their name...), RedHat, SUSE, and Yellow Dog Linux. apt for rpm is also known as apt4rpm, or aptrpm.
Mepis

Mepis + apt = Working On Easy Street

Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: System Views: 5677 Comments
Tutorial quote: My reasoning for combining the traditional Debian apt command with Mepis was speed and efficiency. Also, in the fine tradition of open source, I could choose to use the command line instead of the Kpackage or Mepis System Center package management screen. This is a good way to learn about Debian systems that builds confidence for new users right off the bat.

Let's see how apt works with Mepis.
Debian

Installing Joomla 1.5.6 On A Lighttpd Web Server (Debian Etch)

Post date: September 16, 2008, 10:09 Category: Installing Views: 3250 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install Joomla 1.5.6 on a lighttpd web server on Debian Etch. Joomla comes with an .htaccess file with mod_rewrite rules (for Apache) (to enable search-engine friendly URLs) that do not work on lighttpd. Fortunately Joomla has a built-in method to make search-engine friendly URLs work on lighttpd as well.
Ubuntu

Essential house keeping in Ubuntu

Post date: December 8, 2005, 11:12 Category: System Views: 2904 Comments
Tutorial quote: I started using Ubuntu Breezy ver 5.10 a month back on my machine. Prior to that I was exclusively into Fedora. What drew me to Ubuntu was the huge number of packages in its repositories including softwares which I find useful on a day-to-day basis like Tomboy which I had to compile from source in Fedora. But the Ubuntu CD comes with the base packages which support only open file formats. So if you want support for proprietary file formats like mp3 and quicktime support as well as install softwares not included on the CD, then you have to do some work.

I call it essential housekeeping because it is not exactly a problem, but only a matter of finding out how to get the necessary support. Here I share my experiences in putting the Ubuntu house in order on my machine.
Debian

Updating multiple machines on low bandwidth

Post date: June 16, 2006, 21:06 Category: Network Views: 2813 Comments
Tutorial quote: There are situations where it is common to want to update multiple machines running Debian GNU/Linux whilst minimizing the bandwidth used for downloading packages and updates. There are several different solutions for this problem and here we'll look at one of them: apt-proxy.
Debian

Rolling your own Debian packages (part 1)

Post date: January 21, 2006, 06:01 Category: Software Views: 2721 Comments
Tutorial quote: This two-part article explains how to make a Debian package of simple piece of software, presumably something you have written yourself. Although building a new package is more complex than rebuilding one or having one generated, the idea is that it is actually surprisingly simple to create basic Debian packages. In fact, if you can make software install into a temporary installation tree, you're already 90% done! This text provides a quick alternative to the more comprehensive Debian New Maintainers' Guide. Only knowledge of Makefiles and the basic Debian package tools is assumed.

The first part of this article will continue with some preliminary information about Debian packages. In the second part we walk through a concrete packaging example.
OpenSUSE

GNOME Do - Launcher tool to search and launch applications files and more

Post date: October 21, 2008, 22:10 Category: Desktop Views: 3376 Comments
Tutorial quote: GNOME Do (Do) is an intelligent launcher tool that makes performing common tasks on your computer simple and efficient. “GNOME Do” not only allows you to search for items in your desktop environment (e.g. applications, contacts, bookmarks, files, music), it also allows you to specify actions to perform on search results (e.g. run, open, email, chat, play).
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink