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SuSe

Setting up yum on SUSE LINUX 10.0

Post date: October 16, 2005, 16:10 Category: System Views: 5922 Comments
Tutorial quote: Why should I use yum and not yast? Well, yast is nice, but has some disadvantages: It can#t check for gpg keys, you have to trust the mirrors you add. And, speaking about mirrors, yast has no real mirror management for one source. Especially in these times the most and best known SUSE mirrors are very slow or just closed down, so you have to add other sources in yast. But yast needs your clicks when a mirror is not reachable, and if you enter several sources just as mirrors, it checks every single source - that takes quite a long time!
A last reason (which is not important know because SUSE LINUX has a ugly workaround) is that yast is not able to handle packages for different architectures - it can only install packages for one architecture.
Debian

Distributed Replicated Storage Across Four Nodes With GlusterFS On Debian Lenny

Post date: June 30, 2009, 11:06 Category: Installing Views: 4112 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Debian Lenny) to a distributed replicated storage with GlusterFS. Nodes 1 and 2 (replication1) as well as 3 and 4 (replication2) will mirror each other, and replication1 and replication2 will be combined to one larger storage server (distribution). Basically, this is RAID10 over network. If you lose one server from replication1 and one from replication2, the distributed volume continues to work. The client system (Debian Lenny as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86-64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Ubuntu

Distributed Storage Across Four Storage Nodes With GlusterFS On Ubuntu 9.10

Post date: January 14, 2010, 01:01 Category: Installing Views: 3036 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Ubuntu 9.10) to one large storage server (distributed storage) with GlusterFS. The client system (Ubuntu 9.10 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Ubuntu

How to Create a Private Encrypted Folder On Ubuntu 8.10

Post date: March 5, 2009, 08:03 Category: System Views: 4364 Comments
Tutorial quote: eCryptfs is a POSIX-compliant enterprise-class stacked cryptographic filesystem for Linux.It provides advanced key management and policy features. eCryptfs stores cryptographic metadata in the header of each file written, so that encrypted files can be copied between hosts; the
file will be decryptable with the proper key, and there is no need to keep track of any additional information aside from what is already in the encrypted file itself. Think of
eCryptfs as a sort of “gnupgfs”.eCryptfs is a native Linux filesystem. The kernel module component of eCryptfs is part of the Linux kernel since 2.6.19.
Ubuntu

How to Create a Private Encrypted Folder On Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid)

Post date: January 13, 2009, 13:01 Category: System Views: 4617 Comments
Tutorial quote: eCryptfs is a POSIX-compliant enterprise-class stacked cryptographic filesystem for Linux.It provides advanced key management and policy features. eCryptfs stores cryptographic metadata in the header of each file written, so that encrypted files can be copied between hosts; the file will be decryptable with the proper key, and there is no need to keep track of any additional information aside from what is already in the encrypted file itself. Think of eCryptfs as a sort of “gnupgfs”.eCryptfs is a native Linux filesystem. The kernel module component of eCryptfs is part of the Linux kernel since 2.6.19.

Debian

Installing Debian Etch From A Windows System With

Post date: September 27, 2007, 10:09 Category: Installing Views: 3527 Comments
Tutorial quote: Debian-Installer Loader is a Debian Etch installer for Windows which adds an entry to the boot menu that allows you to start the Debian installation. Unlike the Ubuntu installation with Wubi, real Debian partitions are created during the installation. In the end, you have a dual-boot system (Windows/Debian).
Ubuntu

High-Availability Storage With GlusterFS On Ubuntu 9.10

Post date: January 10, 2010, 15:01 Category: Installing Views: 3335 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up a high-availability storage with two storage servers (Ubuntu 9.10) that use GlusterFS. Each storage server will be a mirror of the other storage server, and files will be replicated automatically across both storage servers. The client system (Ubuntu 9.10 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
Linux

Bandwidth monitoring with iptables

Post date: December 27, 2005, 15:12 Category: Network Views: 4085 Comments
Tutorial quote: Linux has a number of useful bandwidth monitoring and management programs. A quick search on Freshmeat.net for bandwidth returns a number of applications. However, if all you need is a basic overview of your total bandwidth usage, iptables is all you really need -- and it's already installed if you're using a Linux distribution based on the 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernels.
Linux

Manage Your Music Efficiently in Linux

Post date: August 4, 2008, 19:08 Category: Multimedia Views: 3881 Comments
Tutorial quote: Today PC's have become a major source of entertainment ... Whether its listening Music, watching Movies , playing Games or chatting in past time.. PC has does it all to keep you entertained for a long period of time.. PC has now turned to a jukebox now apart from what they are mainly meant for !

Today people generally store their Music in their PC .. Keeping Music in PC has lots of advantages like you have a Soft copy always accessible from anywhere, can easily backup/delete music collection, saves space by not utilizing DVD's/Cd's considering Online Music Shops. Easy management and Quicker Search..

Keeping Music in Cd's and similar stuff is hard.. As you just can't carry every Media's with you and compiling you favorite song collection to Cd's and DVD's will consume too much recourse.. With the arrival of Portable Media player like iPod, Walkman, Zen and others carrying music was so easy..

But to keep your Music collection updated and proper you must keep them in proper way.. A properly tagged and named music file will be easy to find else you will just waste your time searching the Gb's of your Disk..

So why waste time ? Just go through the guide and you will know how to easily and efficiently manage your Music Collection in GNU/Linux OS..
RedHat

Getting started with RHEL4's built-in LVM tools

Post date: June 3, 2005, 16:06 Category: System Views: 6515 Comments
Tutorial quote: Many Unix administrators I know (you know who you are), always used to smirk when I talked about Linux. They could always point to the fact that regardless of whatever I could say, they had journaling file systems, which they could manage using various Logical Volume Management (LVM) tools, and I couldn't touch that.

Well, not any more! Not only does Red Hat offer ext3 as their default file system, but they offer great management tools to boot. As we know, ext2 had a great lifespan, but it was not an enterprise-ready file system that could handle large disk partitions, fast recovery from systems crashes, or large amounts of files. Journaling file systems give you the ability to recover almost instantly from a crash, as you do not need to run fsck after a restart. Similar to how databases recover from crashes, a journaling file system tracks changes to file system metadata and pretty much guarantees that either all or no updates have completed. Of course, these file systems also need elaborate tools to help better configure and manage them accordingly.
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