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Search results for How To Set Up VMware Tools On Various Linux Distributions

Linux

SSH: Best Practices

Post date: January 17, 2008, 13:01 Category: Security Views: 5292 Comments
Tutorial quote: Are you using SSH in the best way possible? Have you configured it to be as limited and secure as possible? The goal of this document is to kick in the new year with some best practices for SSH: why you should use them, how to set them up, and how to verify that they are in place. All of the examples below assume that you are using EnGarde Secure Linux but any modern Linux distribution will do just fine since, as far as I know, everybody ships OpenSSH.
Linux

Recover Data From a dead hard drive using ddrescue

Post date: December 3, 2006, 07:12 Category: System Views: 5439 Comments
Tutorial quote: this is simple tutorial how to recover you data from a damaged disk.Like dd, dd_rescue does copy data from one file or block device to another.dd_rescue is a tool to help you to save data from crashed partition. It tries to read and if it fails, it will go on with the next sectors where tools like dd will fail. If the copying process is interrupted by the user it is possible to continue at any position later. It can copy backwards.
Linux

Setting up a serial console

Post date: February 19, 2007, 19:02 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4241 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial will show you how to set up a serial console on a Linux system, and connect to it via a null modem cable. This is quite useful if your Linux server is in a headless configuration (no keyboard or monitor), as it allows you to easily get a console on the system if there are any problems with it (especially network problems, when SSH is not available). In the end, the GRUB menu will appear over the serial link, as will the bootup messages (output when booting the system). I am using Debian Etch on the server and Ubuntu Edgy on my client, although this should work on any Linux distribution.
RedHat

Ruby on Rails on Red Hat

Post date: November 27, 2006, 07:11 Category: Network Views: 8174 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ruby on Rails is an open source freely available web development framework. It's been quite popular--it won a Jolt "Web Development Tools" award last year, and some prominent Java developers have publically switched to Ruby on Rails. The buzz surrounding Rails is quite impressive--particularly when you consider that Rails had no Fortune 500 company to market it, unlike .NET or Java.

Rails is a Model View Controller (MVC) framework. As you can imagine from the name, applications written using Model View Controller frameworks have three main components: a model, which represents the data and associated logic; the view, which represents how a user interacts with the application; and the controller, which contains all of the business logic that drives the application. This is an artificial distinction, of course, but it is a powerful one.

You'll need Apache 2.0+ and MySQL installed on your Red Hat Linux computer to run these examples.
Ubuntu

Sound Solutions for Ubuntu Hardy,Intrepid and Jaunty Users

Post date: March 16, 2009, 07:03 Category: System Views: 4820 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you have just upgraded to or installed Hardy or Intrepid or Jaunty and you have some sound somewhere, but not everywhere for everything, this is a fast way to get all the missing stuff you need and give you some tools to figure out what is going on. If you hear the startup sound but nothing else, or if some applications work and others donít, this is for you. If you have no sound at all, there is a link at the end of this post for more extensive troubleshooting help but you should try this first anyway as it may solve your problem and will not make matters worse.Make sure that your system is fully updated.

Linux

Benchmarking Maildir Delivery on Linux Filesystems

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3765 Comments
Tutorial quote: The goal of this set of benchmarks is to determine which of the leading Linux filesystems (ext2, ext3, ReiserFS, and XFS) offer the best performance when used for accepting maildir deliveries. The resulting system should be a good balance of delivery and retrieval performance under potentially high concurrent filesystem load.
Debian

How To Install And Use The djbdns Name Server On Debian Etch

Post date: January 24, 2008, 11:01 Category: Installing Views: 3606 Comments
Tutorial quote: djbdns is a very secure suite of DNS tools that consists out of multiple parts: dnscache, a DNS cache that can be used in /etc/resolv.conf instead of your ISP's name servers and that tries to sort out wrong (malicious) DNS answers; axfrdns, a service that runs on the master DNS server and to which the slaves connect for zone transfers; and tinydns, the actual DNS server, a very secure replacement for BIND.
Debian

Postfix Monitoring With Mailgraph And pflogsumm

Post date: July 16, 2006, 16:07 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4509 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article describes how you can monitor your Postfix mailserver with the tools Mailgraph and pflogsumm. Mailgraph creates daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly graphs of sent, received, bounced, and rejected emails and also of spam and viruses, if SpamAssassin and ClamAV are integrated into Postfix. These graphs can be accessed with a browser, whereas pflogsumm ("Postfix Log Entry Summarizer") can be used to send reports of Postfix activity per email.
Linux

Upstream Provider Woes? Point the Ping of Blame

Post date: April 14, 2005, 12:04 Category: Network Views: 3035 Comments
Tutorial quote: Your users are complaining that "the Internet is, like, all slow." Users are always complaining, but you're seeing a lot of timeouts when you check mail, surf the Web, or try to log in for remote administration. Or even worse, latency is so bad that you keep getting killed all to heck in your favorite gory violent online multi-player game, so you know there is a problem. But there a lot of potential bottlenecks between your PC and the outside world, like your Internet gateway, proxy server, firewall, Internet service provider, and so forth, so where do you begin?

One of the best and most versatile network tools you can have is a notebook PC running Linux. This lets you plug in anywhere to run tests and find out what is going on. Make it a nothing-to-lose box--don't keep data on it so you can wipe and reinstall the operating system as necessary, because you want to be able to run tests outside of firewalls. Don't run any services. You can put a minimal iptables firewall on it, as there is no point in being totally exposed, but keep it simple. (Use MondoRescue to make a system snapshot for fast restores.)
Unix+clones

How to restore a hacked Linux server

Post date: July 30, 2006, 18:07 Category: Security Views: 4474 Comments
Tutorial quote: Every sysadmin will try its best to secure the system/s he is managing. Hopefully you never had to restore your own system from a compromise and you will not have to do this in the future. Working on several projects to restore a compromised Linux system for various clients, I have developed a set of rules that others might find useful in similar situations. The type of hacks encountered can be very variate and you might see very different ones than the one I will present, or I have seen live, but even so, this rules might be used as a starting point to develop your own recovery plan.
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