Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for How to Increase ext3 and ReiserFS filesystems Performance in Linux

RedHat

Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4

Post date: July 18, 2005, 22:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 7483 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
OpenSUSE

Read - Write support for NTFS partition on OpenSuse 11.x

Post date: January 12, 2009, 08:01 Category: Desktop Views: 3289 Comments
Tutorial quote: The ntfs-3g driver is an open source, GPL licensed, third generation Linux NTFS driver which was implemented by the Linux-NTFS project. It provides full read-write access to NTFS, excluding access to encrypted files, writing compressed files, changing file ownership, access right.

Technically it's based on and a major improvement to the third generation Linux NTFS driver, ntfsmount. The improvements includes functionality, quality and performance enhancements.
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems Part II

Post date: January 6, 2006, 22:01 Category: Benchmarks Views: 4718 Comments
Tutorial quote: After the last article was published, I have received more than a dozen requests for a second filesystem benchmark using the 2.6 kernel. Since that time, I have converted entirely to XFS for every Linux machine I use, so I may be a bit bias regarding the XFS filesystem. I tried to keep the hardware roughly the same. Instead of a Western Digital 250GB and Promise ATA/100 controller, I am now am using a Seagate 400GB and Maxtor ATA/133 Promise controller. The physical machine remains the same, there is an additional 664MB of swap and I am now running Debian Etch. In the previous article, I was running Slackware 9.1 with custom compiled filesystem utilities. I've added a small section in the beginning that shows the filesystem creation and mount time, I've also added a graph showing these new benchmarks. After the first round of benchmarks, I received a sleuth of e-mails asking for the raw numbers. The numbers are now included in tables at the end of this e-mail for both the last and current set of benchmarks.
Ubuntu

Monitoring Servers and Clients using Munin in Ubuntu

Post date: February 13, 2007, 18:02 Category: Network Views: 3994 Comments
Tutorial quote: Munin” means “memory”.Munin the tool surveys all your computers and remembers what it saw. It presents all the
information in in graphs through a web interface. Its mphasis is on plug and play capabilities. After completing a installation a high number of monitoring plugins will be playing with no more effort. Using Munin you can easily
monitor the performance of your computers, networks, SANs, and quite possibly applications as well. It makes it easy to determine “what’s different today” when a performance problem crops up. It makes it easy to see how you’re doing
capacity wise on all limited resources.
Unix+clones

Xen Disk I/O benchmarking: NetBSD dom0 vs Linux dom0

Post date: April 21, 2005, 10:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3019 Comments
Tutorial quote: Xen is a relatively new technology to enable several virtual machines (domU) to run on one computer. The purpose of this article is to determine what operating system (NetBSD or Linux) should be selected as domain 0 (dom0) operating system to get the best performance when running several CPU and disk intensive virtual machines at the same time.
Unix+clones

X Window Manager Benchmarks (E17 on Top)

Post date: June 9, 2005, 14:06 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3783 Comments
Tutorial quote: I've been focusing on some stability issues of late in E17, but more importantly - speed. I've been doing a little profiling and shaving off cycles where I can find readily optimizable code. I have E17 starting in 0.52 seconds (from execute to usable desktop). Considering that involves loading and rendering and scaling a complex multi-leayered desktop background, loading multiple useful modules (pager, ibar, start, dropshadow, cpufreq handler, clock, etc.), then that's not too bad.

Now I'm a numbers man. I like numbers. I don't like vague "it's faster than X" or "that's slower than this" statements without numbers to back it up. I also like to play fair. Also given there are no "performance suites" i know of that measure window manager performance, I wrote a quick and dirty one.
Ubuntu

Xubuntu 7.04(Feisty Fawn) Screenshots Tour

Post date: June 11, 2007, 23:06 Category: Software Views: 3552 Comments
Tutorial quote: Xubuntu is a complete GNU/Linux based operating system with an Ubuntu base. It is lighter on system requirements and tends to be more efficient than Ubuntu with GNOME or KDE, since it uses the Xfce Desktop environment, which makes it ideal for old or low-end machines, thin-client networks, or for those who would like to get more performance out of their hardware.
Debian

Monitoring Servers and Clients using Munin

Post date: April 4, 2006, 20:04 Category: Installing Views: 2510 Comments
Tutorial quote: "Munin" means "memory".

Munin the tool surveys all your computers and remembers what it saw. It presents all the information in in graphs through a web interface. Its emphasis is on plug and play capabilities. After completing a installation a high number of monitoring plugins will be playing with no more effort. Using Munin you can easily monitor the performance of your computers, networks, SANs, and quite possibly applications as well. It makes it easy to determine "what's different today" when a performance problem crops up. It makes it easy to see how you're doing capacity wise on all limited resources.

It uses the excellent RRDTool and is written in Perl. Munin has a master/node architecture in which the master connects to all the nodes at regular intervals and asks them for sdata. It then stores the data in RRD files, and (if needed) updates the graphs. One of the main goals has been ease of creating new plugins (graphs).
RedHat

Tips & tricks: Performance tuning

Post date: November 26, 2005, 00:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 8672 Comments
Tutorial quote: Advanced tips on optimizing your Red Hat server.
OpenSUSE

Measuring the performance/latency of OpenSuse system - LatencyTOP

Post date: February 17, 2009, 08:02 Category: Optimizing Views: 4838 Comments
Tutorial quote: Skipping audio, slower servers, everyone knows the symptoms of latency. But to know what's going on in the system, what's causing the latency, how to fix it... that's a hard question without good answers right now.

LatencyTOP is a Linux* tool for software developers (both kernel and userspace), aimed at identifying where in the system latency is happening, and what kind of operation/action is causing the latency to happen so that the code can be changed to avoid the worst latency hiccups.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink