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Unix+clones

How to Kill a Process

Post date: November 11, 2007, 05:11 Category: System Views: 3168 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ever working in KDE or Gnome, your application freezes and even the close button doesn’t work? Then it is time to pull out the “kill” command. We can use a combination of the grep and ps command to find our process and when we find the PID number we can effectively kill the process without having to restart KDE or Gnome.
Linux

Change Ctrl + Alt + Delete Behavior To Open System Monitor, in Linux

Post date: September 24, 2009, 12:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2049 Comments
Tutorial quote: Actually, I've written this post before (quite a few months ago) but then deleted it because it didn't work. In the mean time, I found out why, so I decided to post it again. I find pressing Control + Alt + Delete to open up System Monitor to be very useful, especially for Windows users who are used to it and may actually press this quite a few times before realizing it doesn't do anything or what it does in Windows. Using System Monitor, you can preview all running processes, end or kill them, see how much CPU a process is using, CPU + memory + network history, available disk space and even change how much CPU a process should use.

There are 2 ways of changing Ctrl + Alt + Delete behavior to open System Monitor: one if you are running Compiz, and one for Metacity, only to use if you are not running Compiz.
OpenSUSE

Qps Visual Process manager (X11 ps) in openSUSE

Post date: January 21, 2009, 07:01 Category: Software Views: 2898 Comments
Tutorial quote: Qps Visual Process Manager is an X11 version of “top” or “ps” that displays processes in a window and lets you sort and manipulate them. It displays some general system information, and many details about current processes (such as the TCP/UDP sockets in use by a process). Qps runs on Linux and Solaris.
Debian

Processing 10000 Pictures Using Many Computers With Oropo (Debian/Ubuntu)

Post date: April 27, 2010, 11:04 Category: Installing Views: 2816 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you ever had a lot of data to process? In such a moment after a while of processing we realize that it will take ages to complete. It would be faster if we could use two or three or even more computers. Let's use some computers - you think it is a lot of configuration? You are wrong. With Oropo it's easy. Let's discuss a problem of processing large number of pictures. First approach for solving this problem is to process pictures sequentially on one computer. Second approach is to process pictures parallelly on many computers.
Debian

How To Limit CPU Usage Of A Process With cpulimit (Debian/Ubuntu)

Post date: September 14, 2009, 09:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3347 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can limit the CPU usage of a process with the tool cpulimit on Debian/Ubuntu. cpulimit is a simple program that attempts to limit the CPU usage of a process (expressed in percentage, not in cpu time). This is useful to control batch jobs, when you don't want them to eat too much CPU. It does not act on the nice value or other scheduling priority stuff, but on the real CPU usage. Also, it is able to adapt itself to the overall system load, dynamically and quickly.
Unix+clones

How To Automate Spamcop Submissions

Post date: May 26, 2006, 07:05 Category: Network Views: 3036 Comments
Tutorial quote: Spamcop is a service which provides RBLs for mailservers in order to reject incoming mail from spammers.

Their philosophy is to process possible spam complaints from users. When they receive a certain amount of complaints during a time-period then they will blacklist the offender. This system is dependant on spam reporting from users. However, their submission process is not very user-friendly.

As I have said above, Spamcop is pretty much dependant on the user input. If no one submits and verifies spam, then they will have no blacklist. However that whole submission and verification process is a bit annoying. Why should I bother to actually submit spam to spamcop and have it verified? If I just delete it, that will take less time...

The human being isn't really made to do repeating things. This gets quickly boring and hence my idea to automate this submission and verfication process.
In this howto I will show you how I achieved that. All I do is just putting the spam into certain folders and our good old friend cron does the rest.
Linux

Automating Builds on Linux

Post date: April 13, 2005, 00:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2559 Comments
Tutorial quote: An automated nightly build is a process for building an application every night using an infrastructure that automatically executes the required steps at the scheduled time, without any human intervention. A well-planned build process not only builds your application, but also provides you and your team with early detection of incompatible changes in the application components and early detection of errors introduced by newly integrated code. When configured and used properly, automated builds are a critical component for ensuring that the application satisfies quality requirements and continues to run as expected.
Debian

Installing Debian

Post date: September 30, 2005, 16:09 Category: Installing Views: 2733 Comments
Tutorial quote: The experience of installing Debian can vary widely depending on your hardware and requirements. There simply isn't room here to provide a comprehensive installation guide. Instead, you'll find an outline of the major points of the installation process, and plenty of information about where to go and what to do when things don't work as expected.

While Debian has a great reputation for day-to-day use, it has a poor (and not entirely unmerited) reputation for ease of installation. However, with the Debian 3.1 release, code-named Sarge, the developers have taken major steps to improve the installation experience, so don't be afraid.

Perhaps the best advice I can give concerning Debian installation is to not expect to always get it right the first time. If you're ready to start over and experiment, you'll soon become happy with the installation process.
Debian

Boot Debian from an external firewire drive on PowerPc Mac

Post date: December 14, 2005, 19:12 Category: Installing Views: 2576 Comments
Tutorial quote: Messing with a boot process is a delicate matter even on a Mac. Note that the Debian installer will fail at some point during the procedure.
I offer no warranty and assume no responsibility for whatever loss or damage might be caused to your hardware, software or data.
There are other ways to boot Linux from an external firewire drive documented elsewhere on the net. See the Resources section.

Adding or removing peripherals like usb keys, digital cameras, other external HDs, cdroms etc, or installing/removing devfs, udev, and similar stuff might alter the way Linux sees the firewire drive, i suggest becoming familiar with supplying boot options to yaboot during the boot process. See Man pages of yaboot and yaboot.conf.
FreeBSD

Install FreeBSD 4,5,6 and 7

Post date: May 31, 2007, 04:05 Category: Installing Views: 5544 Comments
Tutorial quote: Just quick overview about process installation FreeBSD version 4,5,6 and 7 with link to download video
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