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Search results for How to Set up Network Bonding in Ubuntu 6.10

Ubuntu

How to Set up Network Bonding in Ubuntu 6.10

Post date: February 16, 2007, 22:02 Category: Network Views: 5607 Comments
Tutorial quote: Network Bonding, otherwise known as port trunking allows you to combine multiple network ports into a single group, effectively aggregating the bandwidth of multiple interfaces into a single connection. For example, you can aggregate two gigabyte ports into a two-gigabyte trunk port. Bonding is used primarily to provide network load balancing and fault tolerance.
CentOS

Network Card Bonding On CentOS

Post date: July 5, 2007, 00:07 Category: Network Views: 5975 Comments
Tutorial quote: Bonding is the same as port trunking. In the following I will use the word bonding because practically we will bond interfaces as one. Bonding allows you to aggregate multiple ports into a single group, effectively combining the bandwidth into a single connection. Bonding also allows you to create multi-gigabit pipes to transport traffic through the highest traffic areas of your network. For example, you can aggregate three megabits ports into a three-megabits trunk port. That is equivalent with having one interface with three megabytes speed.
Debian

Ethernet Bonding Configuration in Debian

Post date: April 24, 2006, 19:04 Category: Network Views: 3787 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ethernet bonding refers to aggregating multiple ethernet channels together to form a single channel. This is primarily used for redundancy in ethernet paths or for load balancing. This page refers in particular to performing ethernet bonding under linux, and so does not limit itself to discussion of 802.3ad Trunk Aggregation.
Debian

Aggregating network interfaces

Post date: February 12, 2006, 07:02 Category: Network Views: 3017 Comments
Tutorial quote: Using more than one hard drive to achieve better performance and fault tolerance is very common. Less well known is that it's also possible to aggregate more than one network interface into a single logical interface. In Linux, this is handled by the bonding driver. Benefits of doing this are much the same as the benefits of aggregating discs using RAID: if one device dies, your server carries on working and by using two devices in parallel, performance can be improved.
Ubuntu

Setting Up Network RAID1 With DRBD On Ubuntu 11.10

Post date: November 1, 2011, 09:11 Category: Installing Views: 19013 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up network RAID1 with the help of DRBD on two Ubuntu 11.10 systems. DRBD stands for Distributed Replicated Block Device and allows you to mirror block devices over a network. This is useful for high-availability setups (like a HA NFS server) because if one node fails, all data is still available from the other node.
Ubuntu

Network Analysis With Wireshark On Ubuntu 9.10

Post date: February 21, 2010, 15:02 Category: Installing Views: 3812 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wireshark is a network protocol analyzer (or "packet sniffer") that can be used for network analysis, troubleshooting, software development, education, etc. This guide shows how to install and use it on an Ubuntu 9.10 desktop to analyze the traffic on the local network card.
Debian

How to Create an adhoc host with Ubuntu

Post date: March 2, 2009, 07:03 Category: System Views: 4124 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you ever needed to wirelessly network a Windows PCís directly to a Ubuntu machine? In other words, you lack a router, switch, or other networking mechanism, each PC has a wireless device and you need to trade a file or play a network game? Read on.Ubuntuís NetworkManager 0.7.0 contains the necessary features for creating an Ubuntu adhoc network host.

OpenSUSE

Network Monitoring and Management Tool

Post date: January 27, 2009, 07:01 Category: Network Views: 5530 Comments
Tutorial quote: AutoScan-Network is a network discovering and managing application. No configuration is required to scan your network. The main goal is to print the list of connected equipments in your network.
RedHat

My First Linux Server, Part 2

Post date: April 14, 2005, 22:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3739 Comments
Tutorial quote: A file server is a specialized PC that holds large numbers of files that many people on a network can access. It "serves up" files to everyone instead of each person having files on his or her own PC. The good news is that you don't have to be a network guru to set up a basic file server. If you followed the Easy Linux Install steps in Part 1, you are ready to set up a Linux PC as a file server.

While there are many ways to set up a network and a server, this article concentrates on the simplest approaches with the highest chance of quick success.
Ubuntu

Monitoring Network Latency With Smokeping (Ubuntu 9.04)

Post date: July 16, 2009, 11:07 Category: Installing Views: 7615 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide shows how to install and configure Smokeping on Ubuntu 9.04 to monitor network latency. SmokePing is a deluxe latency measurement tool. It can measure, store and display latency, latency distribution and packet loss. SmokePing uses RRDtool to maintain a longterm data-store and to draw pretty graphs, giving up to the minute information on the state of each network connection.
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