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Linux

How to Create and Configure robot.txt for Apache web server

Post date: February 17, 2009, 08:02 Category: Security Views: 4206 Comments
Tutorial quote: "Robots.txt" is a regular text file that through its name, has special meaning to the majority of "honorable" robots on the web. By defining a few rules in this text file, you can instruct robots to not crawl and index certain files, directories within your site, or at all. For example, you may not want Google to crawl the /images directory of your site, as it's both meaningless to you and a waste of your site's bandwidth. "Robots.txt" lets you tell Google just that.
Debian

Password-Protect Directories With mod_auth_mysql On Apache2 (Debian Squeeze)

Post date: November 15, 2011, 10:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 32605 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to password-protect web directories (with users from a MySQL database) with mod_auth_mysql on Apache2 on a Debian Squeeze server. It is an alternative to the plain-text password files provided by mod_auth and allows you to use normal SQL syntax to create/modify delete users. You can also configure mod_auth_mysql to authenticate against an existing MySQL user table.
CentOS

Installing Xen On CentOS 5.0 (i386)

Post date: June 10, 2007, 22:06 Category: Installing Views: 5064 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a CentOS 5.0 system (i386). Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
CentOS

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.6 (x86_64)

Post date: May 24, 2011, 10:05 Category: Installing Views: 3254 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.6 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
CentOS

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.4 (x86_64)

Post date: December 15, 2009, 12:12 Category: Installing Views: 4825 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.4 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
Fedora

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 10 Server

Post date: March 22, 2009, 13:03 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3648 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 10 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
CentOS

Virtualization With KVM On A CentOS 6.0 Server

Post date: August 28, 2011, 17:08 Category: Installing Views: 5726 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a CentOS 6.0 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
OpenSUSE

Virtualization With KVM On An OpenSUSE 11.4 Server

Post date: April 21, 2011, 11:04 Category: Installing Views: 5163 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on an OpenSUSE 11.4 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Fedora

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 13 Server

Post date: June 20, 2010, 11:06 Category: Installing Views: 3071 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 13 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Fedora

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 14 Server

Post date: December 19, 2010, 17:12 Category: Installing Views: 3100 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 14 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
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