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Debian

Debian Kernel Compile Howto (Kernel 2.6)

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: System Views: 4174 Comments
Tutorial quote: In some cases you might want to compile your own kernel that suits your needs better than the standard kernel that comes with your distribution. I will describe how to do this on a Debian machine. Please note that this tutorial is for kernel 2.6 only!
Debian

Creating a Wiki with kwiki

Post date: December 17, 2005, 22:12 Category: Software Views: 3406 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wikis are simple interactive websites which are extremely easy to use for storing easily updated text content. Using a Wiki you can easily create a lot of content with hyperlinks between them. Debian has packaged several different Wiki systems and here we'll look at installing just one of them: KWiki.

Wikis have become familiar to many people thanks to the popularity of large sites such as Wikipedia and can be very useful for creating collaborative websites.

Whilst there are many Wiki packages included in the Debian GNU/Linux distribution I've always had a soft spot for KWiki due to its simplicity, Perl nature, and low requirements.

Installing the software under Debian is very simple and we will show how to setup a new installation using the Debian Apache2 webserver package.
Linux

Secure Websites Using SSL And Certificates

Post date: May 16, 2007, 22:05 Category: Security Views: 4374 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article will guide you through the entire process of setting up a secure website using SSL and digital certificates. This guide assumes that you already have a fully functional (and configured) server running Apache, BIND, and OpenSSL. Just as a side note, this guide was written based on a Fedora Core 6 distribution, but should be the same for most other distros out there.
Debian

Creating A Fully Encrypted Para-Virtualised Xen Guest System Using Debian Lenny

Post date: May 3, 2009, 10:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4215 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document explains how to set up a fully encrypted para-virtualized XEN instance. In this howto, the host system is running Debian Etch, while the guest system to be installed will be using Debian Lenny. If you are concerned about your privacy, you might want to consider using hard disk encryption to protect your valuable private data from spying eyes. Usually, the easiest way would be to use your distribution's installer to set up a fully encrypted system; I think most recent Linux distributions support this. However, when you are using XEN to provide virtualization, there are situations where you might not want to encrypt your whole computer with all guest instances, but instead only encrypt one OS instance. This howto will deal with exactly this situation. It assumes that the XEN host system is already up and running.
OpenSUSE

openSUSE Network Installation/Upgrade Without CD/DVD

Post date: January 12, 2009, 08:01 Category: Installing Views: 3446 Comments
Tutorial quote: Installing or upgrading the opensuse is fairly easy using CD, or net boot CD but many times it happen the we need to install or upgrade the OS using these media, to solve this problem we got a script called setupgrubfornfsinstall

setupgrubfornfsinstall is a dialog based shell script to prepare remote network installations. The script downloads kernel and initrd of the distribution and creates a boot loader entry for them.
Ubuntu

Monitoring Network Latency With Smokeping (Ubuntu 9.04)

Post date: July 16, 2009, 11:07 Category: Installing Views: 8487 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide shows how to install and configure Smokeping on Ubuntu 9.04 to monitor network latency. SmokePing is a deluxe latency measurement tool. It can measure, store and display latency, latency distribution and packet loss. SmokePing uses RRDtool to maintain a longterm data-store and to draw pretty graphs, giving up to the minute information on the state of each network connection.
Debian

Howto Select Fastest Mirror in Debian

Post date: May 18, 2008, 11:05 Category: Network Views: 3713 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you want to select Fastest Mirror in Debian follow this tutorial and this is very helpful if you want to download and install your debian packages,Updates .netselect-apt automatically creates a sources.list file for using with apt for the specified distribution by downloading the list of Debian mirrors using wget and choosing the fastest servers (both US and non-US) using netselect. The output file is written to OUTFILE.
Debian

Monitoring Network Latency With Smokeping (Debian Etch)

Post date: September 15, 2007, 00:09 Category: Network Views: 7118 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide shows how to install and configure Smokeping on Debian Etch to monitor network latency. From the Smokeping web site: "SmokePing is a deluxe latency measurement tool. It can measure, store and display latency, latency distribution and packet loss. SmokePing uses RRDtool to maintain a longterm data-store and to draw pretty graphs, giving up to the minute information on the state of each network connection."
Debian

How To Run Your Own DNS Servers With ISPConfig 3 (Debian Squeeze)

Post date: July 21, 2011, 10:07 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4612 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can run your own DNS servers (primary and secondary) with ISPConfig 3. To do this, you need two servers with two different public IP addresses and with ISPConfig 3 installed. I will use Debian Squeeze for both DNS servers here to demonstrate the base system setup process and ISPConfig 3 installation, but once you have ISPConfig 3 installed on your servers, the configuration inside ISPConfig 3 is identical, no matter what distribution you use.
Linux

Building an LDAP Server on Linux, Part 2

Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 4262 Comments
Tutorial quote: Welcome back! In Part 1 we learned basic concepts of LDAP and the uses for an LDAP server. Today we'll install and configure an OpenLDAP directory.

A quick note before we get started: this is LDAP 101. We are not installing any kind of encryption or strong authentication; we'll get to that in part 3. In my experience, learning LDAP in small chunks works best. (Then again, perhaps I'm just a bit dim.) So sit back, strap in, and keep your fingers away from the training wheels.

"The wise sysadmin will consult the documentation for their distro; it's quite possible that OpenLDAP will be packaged and ready to go in a pleasing manner (or ready to go in an odd manner--you never know). I'm all for easy--if your particular distribution provides an easy way, use it. RPMs can also be obtained from rpmfind.net, which thoughtfully lists all the required additional packages.

"Debian of course goes its own merry way. apt-get does the job just fine; the tricky bit is finding out the package names. Debian users want ldap-utils; slapd, which is OpenLDAP; and libdb4.1, to get the Sleepycat DB. These three components are enough to get you up and running. apt-get will walk you through a minimal configuration and will automatically start up slapd, the LDAP server daemon.
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