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Linux

iptables: The Linux Firewall Administration Program

Post date: November 29, 2005, 20:11 Category: Network Views: 2862 Comments
Tutorial quote: This chapter covers the iptables firewall administration program used to build a Netfilter firewall. For those of you who are familiar with or accustomed to the older ipfwadm and ipchains programs used with the IPFW technology, iptables will look very similar to those programs. However, it is much more feature-rich and flexible, and it is very different on subtle levels.
Linux

Port Knocking

Post date: April 16, 2005, 10:04 Category: Network Views: 3012 Comments
Tutorial quote: Firewall administrators are challenged to balance flexibility and security when designing a comprehensive rule set. A firewall should provide protection against malfeasants, while allowing trusted users to connect. Unfortunately, it is not always possible to filter out the bad guys, because filtering on the basis of IP addresses and ports does not distinguish connecting users. Bad guys can and do come from trusted IP addresses. Open ports remain a necessary vulnerability: they allow connections to applications but also may turn into open doors for attack. This article presents a new security system, termed port knocking, in which trusted users manipulate firewall rules by transmitting information across closed ports.
Linux

Linux stateful firewall design

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 2421 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows you how to use netfilter to set up a powerful Linux stateful firewall. All you need is an existing Linux system that's currently using a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel. A laptop, workstation, router or server with at a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel will do. You should be reasonably familiar with standard network terminology like IP addresses, source and destination port numbers, TCP, UDP and ICMP, etc. By the end of the tutorial, you'll understand how Linux stateful firewalls are put together and you'll have several example configurations to use in your own projects.
Linux

Three tools to help you configure iptables

Post date: May 25, 2005, 14:05 Category: Network Views: 3108 Comments
Tutorial quote: Every user whose client connects to the Internet should configure his firewall immediately after installation. Some Linux distributions include firewall configuration as a part of installation, often offering a set of defaults configurations to choose from. However, to ensure that your machine presents the minimum "attack surface" (a measure of the number of vulnerable ports, user accounts, and sockets exposed to attack) to the predatory inhabitants of the Internet, you may need to do some manual configuration of your firewall. Here are three tools that can help.
The Linux kernel (version 2.4 onwards) contains a framework for packet filtering and firewalling using netfilter and iptables. Netfilter is a set of hooks inside the Linux kernel that allows kernel modules to register callback functions with the network stack. Iptables is a generic table structure for the definition of rulesets. Each rule within an IP table consists of a number of classifiers (iptables matches) and one connected action (iptables target). Iptables has extensive documentation that can be accessed online or by typing man iptables at the command line. Yet despite the depth of the documentation available for iptables, its complexity can be baffling.
Ubuntu

Gufw - Simple GUI for ufw (Uncomplicated Firewall) in Ubuntu

Post date: September 29, 2008, 06:09 Category: Software Views: 4249 Comments
Tutorial quote: Gufw is an easy to use Ubuntu / Linux firewall, powered by ufw.Gufw is an easy, intuitive, way to manage your Linux firewall. It supports common tasks such as allowing or blocking pre-configured, common p2p, or individual ports port(s), and many others! Gufw is powered by ufw, runs on Ubuntu, and anywhere else Python, GTK, and Ufw are available.
Unix+clones

Bypass any Firewall or Throttling ISP with SSH

Post date: October 22, 2007, 06:10 Category: Network Views: 4525 Comments
Tutorial quote: On some networks it’s impossible to use BitTorrent. For example, if you’re at work, school, or connected to Comcast or a public hotspot. But there’s an easy solution to overcome this problem. By using a secure connection (SSH), you can bypass almost every firewall or traffic shaping application.
Linux

How-to build a LINUX router, firewall, gateway

Post date: June 13, 2010, 09:06 Category: Network Views: 4287 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can use a linux box as a bridge, router, firewall and gateway.
Solaris

Configuring the Behavior of the Solaris IP Filter Firewall

Post date: April 20, 2007, 18:04 Category: Network Views: 9111 Comments
Tutorial quote: When defining packet filtering rules in the /etc/ipf/ipf.conf file, it is necessary to understand how the Solaris IP Filter firewall reads this file and compares any packet against the rules in the file.
Fedora

Watching Your Power Consumption With Powertop On Fedora 7

Post date: October 1, 2007, 10:10 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2975 Comments
Tutorial quote: Powertop is a command-line tool released by Intel that shows you the power consumption of the applications running on your system. It works best on notebooks with Intel mobile processors and can help you find out the programs that put a strain on your notebook battery. It requires kernel 2.6.21 or newer with tickless idle enabled (CONFIG_NO_HZ) (which is currently available for 32-bit kernels only). Fedora 7 comes with a 2.6.21 kernel by default, so we can use Powertop on it.
Gentoo

GCC extension for protecting from stack-smashing attacks

Post date: April 20, 2005, 10:04 Category: Security Views: 3083 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Stack-Smashing Protector (SSP, formerly ProPolice) is perhaps one of the most sophisticated yet simplistic protective compiler technologies to date which makes use of canary values by rearranging local variables and function pointers. When (ssp) is enabled it can prevent many forms of the common return-to-libc attack. It is implemented as a patch to GCC which will automatically insert protection code into your programs at compile time. It is developed by Hiroaki Etoh at IBM.
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