Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for How to set up a home DNS server

Debian

Virtualization With Xen On Debian Lenny (AMD64)

Post date: February 8, 2009, 13:02 Category: Installing Views: 3204 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a Debian Lenny (5.0) system (AMD64). Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Linux

Build a Home Terabyte Backup System Using Linux

Post date: December 1, 2005, 01:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3190 Comments
Tutorial quote: A terabyte-plus backup and storage system is now an affordable option for Linux users. This article discusses options for building and configuring an inexpensive, expandable, Linux-based backup server.
Debian

Paravirtualization With Xen 4.0 On Debian Squeeze (AMD64)

Post date: March 31, 2011, 09:03 Category: Installing Views: 2891 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen 4.0 on a Debian Squeeze (6.0) system (AMD64) and create paravirtualized guests. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Unix+clones

Keeping Your Life in Subversion

Post date: October 2, 2005, 16:10 Category: Software Views: 3288 Comments
Tutorial quote: I keep my life in a Subversion repository. For the past five years, I've checked every file I've created and worked on, every email I've sent or received, and every config file I've tweaked into revision control. Five years ago, when I started doing this using CVS, people thought I was nuts to use revision control in this way. Today it's still not a common practice, but thanks to my earlier article "CVS homedir" (Linux Journal, issue 101), I know I'm not alone. In this article I will describe how my new home directory setup is working now that I've switched from CVS to Subversion.

Subversion is a revision-control system. Like the earlier and much cruftier CVS, its purpose is to manage chunks of code, such as free software programs with multiple developers, or in-house software projects involving several employees. Unlike CVS, Subversion handles directories and file renaming reasonably, which is more than sufficient reason to switch to it if you're already using CVS. It also fixes most of CVS's other misfeatures. Subversion still has its warts, though, such as an inability to store symbolic links and some file permissions, and its need for twice as much disk space as you'd expect thanks to the copies of everything in those .svn directories. These problems can be quite annoying when you're keeping your whole home directory in svn. Why bother?
eBox

Using eBox As A Gateway: Firewall, Traffic Shaping, HTTP Proxy And More

Post date: June 11, 2010, 12:06 Category: Installing Views: 5553 Comments
Tutorial quote: eBox Platform is the Linux small business server that allows you to manage all your network services like firewall, DHCP, DNS, VPN, proxy, IDS, mail, file and printer sharing, VoIP, IM and much more. These functionalities are tightly integrated, automating most tasks, avoiding mistakes and saving time for system administrators. This article will show you step by step how to use eBox as a Gateway, featuring network configuration, load balancing between two Internet connections with WAN failover and multigateway rules for policy routing, traffic shaping, DHCP and DNS cache for the LAN network and HTTP proxy with different content filtering policies and antivirus.
OpenSUSE

ISP Server Setup - OpenSUSE 10 RC 1

Post date: October 9, 2005, 18:10 Category: Network Views: 5240 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is a detailed description about the steps to be taken to setup a OpenSUSE 10.0 based server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters (web server (SSL-capable), mail server (with SMTP-AUTH and TLS!), DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.) and the ISPConfig control panel.
Unix+clones

Build Your Own IM Server with Jabber

Post date: June 26, 2005, 22:06 Category: Network Views: 5095 Comments
Tutorial quote: Instant messaging is a great business communications tool. For example, here at Enterprise Networking Planet the staff and writers all work in their pajamas at home, at far-flung points all over the globe. ENP's crusty editor-with-a-heart-of-gold Perry White lives in a villa in the South of France. I send in my columns from a sailboat currently anchored at Raratonga. Sure, we can exchange emails, but there are times when a live exchange is better.
Unix+clones

Installing and securing Squid

Post date: March 13, 2006, 15:03 Category: Software Views: 4749 Comments
Tutorial quote: Squid is a high-performance proxy caching server for web clients, supporting FTP, gopher, and HTTP data objects. Unlike traditional caching software, Squid handles all requests in a single, non-blocking, I/O-driven process. Squid keeps meta data and especially hot objects cached in RAM, caches DNS lookups, supports non-blocking DNS lookups, and implements negative caching of failed requests. Squid supports SSL, extensive access controls, and full request logging. By using the lightweight Internet Cache Protocol, Squid caches can be arranged in a hierarchy or mesh for additional bandwidth savings.

After the installation and base configuration of squid we will add another layer of security by chrooting it.
Ubuntu

How to use SSH Via HTTP Proxy using Corkscrew in Ubuntu

Post date: December 28, 2008, 22:12 Category: Software Views: 4783 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you want to ssh your vps server or your home computer from your work place (assuming you are using http proxy).You need to use Corkscrew.corkscrew is a simple tool to tunnel TCP connections through an HTTP proxy supporting the CONNECT method. It reads stdin and writes to stdout during the connection, just like netcat.

Fedora

Fedora 13 Samba Standalone Server With tdbsam Backend

Post date: August 5, 2010, 15:08 Category: Installing Views: 3380 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains the installation of a Samba fileserver on Fedora 13 and how to configure it to share files over the SMB protocol as well as how to add users. Samba is configured as a standalone server, not as a domain controller. In the resulting setup, every user has his own home directory accessible via the SMB protocol and all users have a shared directory with read-/write access.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink