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Search results for How to set up a home web server

CentOS

Virtual Hosting Howto With Virtualmin On CentOS 5.1

Post date: March 4, 2008, 11:03 Category: Installing Views: 5242 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up a CentOS 5.x server to offer all services needed by virtual web hosters. These include web hosting, smtp server with (SMTP-AUTH and TLS, SPF, DKIM, Domainkeys), DNS, FTP, MySQL, POP3/IMAP, Firewall, Webalizer for stats.
CentOS

CentOS 4.6 Server Setup: LAMP, Email, DNS, FTP, ISPConfig

Post date: January 10, 2008, 13:01 Category: Installing Views: 6144 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up a CentOS 4.6 based server that offers all services needed by ISPs and web hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc. This tutorial is written for the 32-bit version of CentOS 4.6, but should apply to the 64-bit version with very little modifications as well.
Debian

How To Set Up WebDAV With MySQL Authentication On Apache2 (Debian Etch)

Post date: June 19, 2008, 09:06 Category: Installing Views: 3058 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to set up WebDAV with MySQL authentication (using mod_auth_mysql) on Apache2 on a Debian Etch server. WebDAV stands for Web-based Distributed Authoring and Versioning and is a set of extensions to the HTTP protocol that allow users to directly edit files on the Apache server so that they do not need to be downloaded/uploaded via FTP. Of course, WebDAV can also be used to upload and download files.
Ubuntu

Running A File- And Print-Server With eBox On Ubuntu 8.04 Server

Post date: August 28, 2008, 11:08 Category: Installing Views: 2840 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article shows how to run a file- and print-server for small and medium enterprises (SME) on one single Ubuntu 8.04 server. It is very easy to set up, and management is done with an easy-to-use web interface called eBox so once the system is set up, you can forget about the command line. eBox was developed to administrate advanced services for corporate networks.
OpenSUSE

The Perfect Server - OpenSUSE 12.1 x86_64 With Apache2 [ISPConfig 3]

Post date: November 22, 2011, 11:11 Category: Installing Views: 28283 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is a detailed description about how to set up an OpenSUSE 12.1 64bit (x86_64) server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable) with PHP, CGI and SSI support, Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH, TLS and virtual mail users, BIND DNS server, Pureftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, Mailman, etc. Since version 3.0.4, ISPConfig comes with full support for the nginx web server in addition to Apache; this tutorial covers the setup of a server that uses Apache, not nginx.
Fedora

Setting Up A High-Availability Load Balancer With HAProxy/Heartbeat On Fedora 8

Post date: March 2, 2008, 12:03 Category: Installing Views: 4176 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy and heartbeat on Fedora 8. The load balancer acts between the user and two (or more) Apache web servers that hold the same content. The load balancer passes the requests to the web servers and it also checks their health. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining web server(s). In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using heartbeat. If the master fails, the slave becomes the master - users will not notice any disruption of the service. HAProxy is session-aware - you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions like forums, shopping carts, etc.
Linux

Build a Home Terabyte Backup System Using Linux

Post date: December 1, 2005, 01:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3286 Comments
Tutorial quote: A terabyte-plus backup and storage system is now an affordable option for Linux users. This article discusses options for building and configuring an inexpensive, expandable, Linux-based backup server.
CentOS

The Perfect Server - CentOS 5.5 x86_64 [ISPConfig 2]

Post date: May 26, 2010, 11:05 Category: Installing Views: 5497 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up a CentOS 5.5 server (x86_64) that offers all services needed by ISPs and web hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc. This tutorial is written for the 64-bit version of CentOS 5.5, but should apply to the 32-bit version with very little modifications as well. In the end you should have a system that works reliably, and if you like you can install the free webhosting control panel ISPConfig (i.e., ISPConfig runs on it out of the box).
CentOS

The Perfect Server - CentOS 5.4 x86_64 [ISPConfig 2]

Post date: October 29, 2009, 12:10 Category: Installing Views: 6299 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up a CentOS 5.4 server (x86_64) that offers all services needed by ISPs and web hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc. This tutorial is written for the 64-bit version of CentOS 5.4, but should apply to the 32-bit version with very little modifications as well. In the end you should have a system that works reliably, and if you like you can install the free webhosting control panel ISPConfig (i.e., ISPConfig runs on it out of the box).
Unix+clones

Keeping Your Life in Subversion

Post date: October 2, 2005, 16:10 Category: Software Views: 3360 Comments
Tutorial quote: I keep my life in a Subversion repository. For the past five years, I've checked every file I've created and worked on, every email I've sent or received, and every config file I've tweaked into revision control. Five years ago, when I started doing this using CVS, people thought I was nuts to use revision control in this way. Today it's still not a common practice, but thanks to my earlier article "CVS homedir" (Linux Journal, issue 101), I know I'm not alone. In this article I will describe how my new home directory setup is working now that I've switched from CVS to Subversion.

Subversion is a revision-control system. Like the earlier and much cruftier CVS, its purpose is to manage chunks of code, such as free software programs with multiple developers, or in-house software projects involving several employees. Unlike CVS, Subversion handles directories and file renaming reasonably, which is more than sufficient reason to switch to it if you're already using CVS. It also fixes most of CVS's other misfeatures. Subversion still has its warts, though, such as an inability to store symbolic links and some file permissions, and its need for twice as much disk space as you'd expect thanks to the copies of everything in those .svn directories. These problems can be quite annoying when you're keeping your whole home directory in svn. Why bother?
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