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Search results for How to set up smart package manager on SUSE LINUX 10.0

SuSe

Setting up yum on SUSE LINUX 10.0

Post date: October 16, 2005, 16:10 Category: System Views: 5392 Comments
Tutorial quote: Why should I use yum and not yast? Well, yast is nice, but has some disadvantages: It can#t check for gpg keys, you have to trust the mirrors you add. And, speaking about mirrors, yast has no real mirror management for one source. Especially in these times the most and best known SUSE mirrors are very slow or just closed down, so you have to add other sources in yast. But yast needs your clicks when a mirror is not reachable, and if you enter several sources just as mirrors, it checks every single source - that takes quite a long time!
A last reason (which is not important know because SUSE LINUX has a ugly workaround) is that yast is not able to handle packages for different architectures - it can only install packages for one architecture.
Ubuntu

Installing Firefox 4.0 (.deb Package) On Ubuntu 10.10

Post date: March 24, 2011, 12:03 Category: Desktop Views: 3087 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this short guide I will show you how you can install the new Mozilla Firefox 4.0 browser (released March 22, 2011) on an Ubuntu 10.10 desktop. Fortunately, there's a Launchpad PPA repository that has Firefox 4.0 .deb packages, so we can easily install it through Ubuntu's package manager.
Ubuntu

Simple Package management with Synaptic Package Manager

Post date: December 5, 2006, 22:12 Category: System Views: 4004 Comments
Tutorial quote: Synaptic is a graphical user interface (GUI) for managing software packages on Debian-based distributions. If you are using Debian or Ubuntu you will easily find Synaptic in the System Tools menu or in the Administration menu. Synaptic uses the GTK graphic libraries . So, if you are using GNOME on your debian-based distro you will probably have Synaptic installed as well. Synaptic is a graphical package management program for apt. It provides the same features as the apt-get command line utility with a GUI front-end based on Gtk+.
Debian

An apt-get primer

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: System Views: 2690 Comments
Tutorial quote: If any single program defines the Debian Linux project, that program is apt-get. apt-get is Debian's main tool for installing and removing software. Working with the .deb package format, apt-get offers sophisticated package management that few Red Hat Package Manager RPM-based distributions can match.

Besides the convenience, an advantage of apt-get is that it reduces the chances of falling into dependency hell, that limbo where software installation fails for lack of another piece of software, whose installation fails for lack of another piece of software, and so on. If you know how Debian's archive system works, and how to choose the sources that apt-get uses, and use a few precautions in your upgrades, then the chances are that dependency problems will never bedevil you. Should you descend into dependency hell anyway, apt-get offers useful tools for climbing out of it.
Debian

Debian/Ubuntu Package management Using dpkg

Post date: April 17, 2007, 22:04 Category: Software Views: 3260 Comments
Tutorial quote: Dpkg is the Debian package manager dpkg is a medium-level tool to install, build, remove and manage Debian packages. The primary and more user-friendly front-end for dpkg is dselect.dpkg itself is controlled entirely via command line parameters,which consist of exactly one action and zero or more options. The action-parameter tells dpkg what to do and options control the behavior of the action in some way.
OpenSUSE

Hacking OpenSUSE

Post date: December 3, 2005, 17:12 Category: System Views: 6742 Comments
Tutorial quote: There's more to SUSE Linux than simply installing it and going to work. To get the most from the operating system, you'll probably want to do some post-install fine tuning. This article by Jem Matzan explains how to: add download sources to YaST; install the Mozilla Thunderbird email client; add support for Java, Flash, Acrobat, Windows Media, MP3s, and RealMedia; play DVDs -- and more. It serves as a useful supplement to Steven J. Rosen's excellent how-to, "Installing SUSE Linux 10 on a Laptop," recently published here on DesktopLinux.com. Enjoy . . . !
SuSe

How to set up the SUSE Linux Virtual I/O Server

Post date: May 28, 2005, 00:05 Category: Network Views: 4025 Comments
Tutorial quote: Reduce your operation costs for complex environments by creating efficient and flexible virtualisation capabilities. Nigel Griffiths describes the benefits of the IBM® POWER5™ servers and provides examples on how to set up the environment for pSeries®, p5, and eServer™ OpenPower systems.
SuSe

Working with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9

Post date: June 22, 2005, 09:06 Category: System Views: 3446 Comments
Tutorial quote: Working with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) requires an understanding of the login process, including local account files, system accounts, and managing identities.

Using a console shell or the graphical environment are two possible methods of working on a SLES machine.

Finding your way around a SLES installation requires an in-depth knowledge of the filesystem layout. Essential filesystem components are documented and explained in this chapter. Basic filesystem permissions are also described.
Debian

Version Control For Your /etc Directory With etckeeper/Bazaar On Debian Squeeze

Post date: July 17, 2011, 18:07 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2444 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how you can store the contents of your /etc directory in a version control system (VCS) with the help of etckeeper on Debian Squeeze. etckeeper hooks into Debian's package manager apt so that whenever you install/remove a package with apt, etckeeper will commit all changes to the /etc directory to your VCS; it also tracks file metadata such as permissions which is important for files such as /etc/shadow. Using etckeeper, you can go back to a previous version of /etc if an update has overwritten valuable configuration files. Not only will etckeeper track apt's changes to /etc, it will also do a daily auto-commit so that your manual changes go to VCS as well; in addition to that, you can do commits at any time manually.
SuSe

How To Compile A Kernel - The SuSE Way

Post date: December 3, 2006, 21:12 Category: System Views: 8452 Comments
Tutorial quote: Each distribution has some specific tools to build a custom kernel from the sources. This article is about compiling a kernel on SuSE systems. It describes how to build a custom kernel using the latest unmodified kernel sources from www.kernel.org (vanilla kernel) so that you are independent from the kernels supplied by your distribution. It also shows how to patch the kernel sources if you need features that are not in there.
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