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Linux

Creating a safe directory with PAM and Encfs

Post date: June 7, 2006, 20:06 Category: Security Views: 3132 Comments
Tutorial quote: Now, in my network (and others) the credentials provided at login could (and should) be used by those programs. How can you retrieve these credentials, providing enough security?
With a the PAM modules pam_script it's possible to store the password in a file, which will be used by fusemb and mount.cifs to read the password from.

To achieve security, one could make the user logging in owner and deny read/write for anybody else. Remove this file when the user ends his/her session.
This is enough, for runtime. But I was wondering, but what if the system crashes, and the file with the credentials remains on the harddrive? Anybody who is able to mount this harddrive with for example a lifecd, can read this file!

That's why I was looking for a way to encrypt this file.

With encfs this is very possible! At run time it gives an interface to encrypted files and directories, which does only exist at runtime! When the system is not running, there are only encrypted files, useless when you do not know the key to it. And this key is exactly the (encrypted) password! That's why I've chosen for a combination of PAM and Encfs.
Debian

Creating Encrypted FTP Backups With duplicity And ftplicity On Debian Etch

Post date: December 18, 2007, 12:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3288 Comments
Tutorial quote: When you rent a dedicated server nowadays, almost all providers give you FTP backup space for your server on one of the provider's backup systems. This tutorial shows how you can use duplicity and ftplicity to create encrypted (so that nobody with access to the backup server can read sensitive data in your backups) backups on the provider's remote backup server over FTP. ftplicity is a duplicity wrapper script (provided by the German computer magazine c't) that allows us to use duplicity without interaction (i.e., you do not have to type in any passwords).
BSD

Network-Attached Storage With FreeNAS

Post date: February 13, 2007, 19:02 Category: Installing Views: 8752 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can set up a network-attached storage server with FreeNAS. FreeNAS is based on the FreeBSD operating system and supports CIFS (samba), FTP, NFS, RSYNC, SSH, local user authentication, and software RAID (0, 1, 5). It comes with a powerful web interface and uses very little space on the hard drive - about 32MB.
Nexenta

How To Build A Standalone File Server With Nexenta 3.0 Beta2

Post date: May 6, 2010, 11:05 Category: Installing Views: 4350 Comments
Tutorial quote: Nexenta is a project developing a debian user-land for the OpenSolaris kernel. This provides all of the advantages of apt as a package respoitory (based on the Ubuntu LTS apt repository, currently using 8.04) as well as the advantages of the ZFS filesystem. In the resulting setup every user can have his/her own home directory accessible via the SMB protocol or NFS with read-/write access.
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems Part II

Post date: January 6, 2006, 22:01 Category: Benchmarks Views: 4670 Comments
Tutorial quote: After the last article was published, I have received more than a dozen requests for a second filesystem benchmark using the 2.6 kernel. Since that time, I have converted entirely to XFS for every Linux machine I use, so I may be a bit bias regarding the XFS filesystem. I tried to keep the hardware roughly the same. Instead of a Western Digital 250GB and Promise ATA/100 controller, I am now am using a Seagate 400GB and Maxtor ATA/133 Promise controller. The physical machine remains the same, there is an additional 664MB of swap and I am now running Debian Etch. In the previous article, I was running Slackware 9.1 with custom compiled filesystem utilities. I've added a small section in the beginning that shows the filesystem creation and mount time, I've also added a graph showing these new benchmarks. After the first round of benchmarks, I received a sleuth of e-mails asking for the raw numbers. The numbers are now included in tables at the end of this e-mail for both the last and current set of benchmarks.
Ubuntu

Setting Up Network RAID1 With DRBD On Ubuntu 11.10

Post date: November 1, 2011, 09:11 Category: Installing Views: 18724 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up network RAID1 with the help of DRBD on two Ubuntu 11.10 systems. DRBD stands for Distributed Replicated Block Device and allows you to mirror block devices over a network. This is useful for high-availability setups (like a HA NFS server) because if one node fails, all data is still available from the other node.
Debian

Setting Up Network RAID1 With DRBD On Debian Squeeze

Post date: August 23, 2011, 07:08 Category: Installing Views: 2054 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up network RAID1 with the help of DRBD on two Debian Squeeze systems. DRBD stands for Distributed Replicated Block Device and allows you to mirror block devices over a network. This is useful for high-availability setups (like a HA NFS server) because if one node fails, all data is still available from the other node.
CloneZilla

Back Up/Restore Hard Drives And Partitions With CloneZilla Live

Post date: November 30, 2008, 13:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 10006 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can back up and restore hard drives and partitions with CloneZilla Live. CloneZilla Live is a Linux Live-CD that you insert into your computer; it contains hard disk and partition imaging and cloning tools similar to Norton Ghost. The created images are compressed and can be transferred to a Samba-, SSH-, or NFS server or to a local hard drive or USB drive.
Solaris

Restoring a Sun system using JumpStart technology

Post date: April 13, 2005, 05:04 Category: Installing Views: 3918 Comments
Tutorial quote: If a server crash and the file systems are corrupted or totally destroyed, then the only way to recover the data is to restore from backups. If it is only user data that is corrupted, the task is in general simple, but if the system disk fails, then there is a little bit more work involved in order to to recover the system. This article explains how to backup Sun systems using ufsrestore over NFS, and how to use Sun's JumpStart technology to restore Sun servers and workstations over the network.
FreeBSD

Lightweight Web Serving with thttpd

Post date: December 1, 2005, 00:12 Category: Software Views: 7753 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Apache HTTP Server is the most popular web server due to its functionality, stability, and maturity. However, this does not make it suitable for all uses: slow machines and embedded systems may have serious problems running it because of its size. Here is where lightweight HTTP servers come into play, as their low-memory footprints deliver decent results without having to swap data back to disk.

Similarly, these small HTTP servers are suitable to serve static content efficiently so as to allow Apache, mod_perl, mod_python, or even servlet containers to handle dynamic requests without tying up memory-hungry children to serve small images. In other words, these applications can serve as a complement to your existing full-featured web server, not as a replacement.

One of these servers is thttpd, a simple, small, portable, fast, and secure HTTP server. Among its features are support for the HTTP/1.1 standard, CGIs, virtual hosts, and IPv6. This article shows how to install and configure this software under NetBSD. I chose NetBSD not only because it is my preferred OS, but also because it has the ability to run on the most disparate old hardware, where thttpd shows its strengths. I had a Macintosh Performa 630 (a 68LC040 chip at 33MHz) running NetBSD/mac68k 2.0 with thttpd on top of it, serving pages to my home network nicely.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink