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Debian

How To Set Up A Load-Balanced MySQL Cluster

Post date: March 31, 2006, 19:03 Category: Software Views: 4502 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to configure a MySQL 5 cluster with three nodes: two storage nodes and one management node. This cluster is load-balanced by a high-availability load balancer that in fact has two nodes that use the Ultra Monkey package which provides heartbeat (for checking if the other node is still alive) and ldirectord (to split up the requests to the nodes of the MySQL cluster).

In this document I use Debian Sarge for all nodes. Therefore the setup might differ a bit for other distributions. The MySQL version I use in this setup is 5.0.19. If you do not want to use MySQL 5, you can use MySQL 4.1 as well, although I haven't tested it.

This howto is meant as a practical guide; it does not cover the theoretical backgrounds. They are treated in a lot of other documents in the web.
XenServer+Express

Virtualization With XenServer Express 5.0.0

Post date: October 14, 2008, 10:10 Category: Installing Views: 8082 Comments
Tutorial quote: This Howto covers the installation of XenServer Express 5.0.0 and the creation of virtual machines with the XenCenter administrator console. XenServer Express is the free virtualization platform from Citrix, the company behind the well known Xen virtualization engine. XenServer Express makes it easy to create, run and manage Xen virtual machines with the XenCenter administrator console. The XenServer Express installation CD contains a full Linux distribution which is customized to run XenServer Express.
Gentoo

Fbsplash on gentoo

Post date: April 12, 2005, 05:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 4457 Comments
Tutorial quote: Gensplash is a project started by Spock whose aim is to create a set of tools which could enrich the Gentoo boot process by displaying messages, animations, progress bars, etc. An explanation of the various things named *splash (bootsplash, gensplash, fbsplash, and splashutils) and how they relate to each other, can be found at Spock's Gensplash site.

Fbsplash is part of the gensplash project. According to fbsplash's documentation, "the framebuffer splash is a kernel feature that allows displaying a background picture on selected consoles and switching the first console to the so-called silent mode, while booting/rebooting/shutting down the system." The fbsplash device is accessed through the /dev/fbsplash device node. For fbsplash to work, a frame buffer device is required.
SuSe

Installing FreeNX Server on SUSE 10

Post date: December 27, 2005, 15:12 Category: Network Views: 7987 Comments
Tutorial quote: Not long ago, I reviewed SUSE Linux 10 and found that they had included the latest version of FreeNX (a free version of NoMachine's NX Server) on the installation media. I'd never really tried FreeNX at that point but had heard some good things about it, so I thought I'd give it a shot. Well, once it was installed and working I have to say I was immediately impressed by how simple it was to setup and how well (read: fast) it performed over a WAN connection. I was literally able to get my desktop at home from anywhere else in the world and get near-local speed. Normally, working on a remote system is alright until you need to type in any shape or form. There was almost no delay from the time I'd press a key to the time it would show up on the screen. This is what sold me on FreeNX and prompted me to offer to write a HOWTO on the topic. I was overwhelmed with email from our readers asking that I write it... so here we are!
Linux

The Linux /proc Filesystem as a Programmers' Tool

Post date: June 22, 2005, 09:06 Category: Programming Views: 4200 Comments
Tutorial quote: My entry into systems programming was guided by my desire to understand further the operating systems I was working with daily as a contract UNIX and, later, Linux system administrator. The result of this was ifchk, a packet sniffer detector I wrote in C and released in June of 2003. ifchk initially was written under IRIX and then ported to Linux, mostly under the 2.4 kernel. The current ifchk revision, beta 4, recently was released and beta 5 is on the way.

My work on ifchk has allowed me to examine programmatically several areas of operating system functionality. Examples include the Linux netlink(7) and rtnetlink(7) facilities, device control--that is, network interfaces--via ioctl(2), signals and proc, the process filesystem. Proc and its ability to display a wide array of data concerning the runtime state of a system are the focus of our discussion here.
Unix+clones

How To Automate Spamcop Submissions

Post date: May 26, 2006, 07:05 Category: Network Views: 3839 Comments
Tutorial quote: Spamcop is a service which provides RBLs for mailservers in order to reject incoming mail from spammers.

Their philosophy is to process possible spam complaints from users. When they receive a certain amount of complaints during a time-period then they will blacklist the offender. This system is dependant on spam reporting from users. However, their submission process is not very user-friendly.

As I have said above, Spamcop is pretty much dependant on the user input. If no one submits and verifies spam, then they will have no blacklist. However that whole submission and verification process is a bit annoying. Why should I bother to actually submit spam to spamcop and have it verified? If I just delete it, that will take less time...

The human being isn't really made to do repeating things. This gets quickly boring and hence my idea to automate this submission and verfication process.
In this howto I will show you how I achieved that. All I do is just putting the spam into certain folders and our good old friend cron does the rest.
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems Part II

Post date: January 6, 2006, 22:01 Category: Benchmarks Views: 5545 Comments
Tutorial quote: After the last article was published, I have received more than a dozen requests for a second filesystem benchmark using the 2.6 kernel. Since that time, I have converted entirely to XFS for every Linux machine I use, so I may be a bit bias regarding the XFS filesystem. I tried to keep the hardware roughly the same. Instead of a Western Digital 250GB and Promise ATA/100 controller, I am now am using a Seagate 400GB and Maxtor ATA/133 Promise controller. The physical machine remains the same, there is an additional 664MB of swap and I am now running Debian Etch. In the previous article, I was running Slackware 9.1 with custom compiled filesystem utilities. I've added a small section in the beginning that shows the filesystem creation and mount time, I've also added a graph showing these new benchmarks. After the first round of benchmarks, I received a sleuth of e-mails asking for the raw numbers. The numbers are now included in tables at the end of this e-mail for both the last and current set of benchmarks.
Linux

Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 2

Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: Hardware Views: 4499 Comments
Tutorial quote: In Part 1 we reviewed hardware options, which wireless utilities should be present, how to use Windows drivers, and how to be open to connect to any available wireless access point. Today we'll cover configurations on Red Hat- and Debian-type systems, basic security, and hardware discovery.

Wireless connectivity can be rather overly friendly, allowing connections from anyone. This howto assumes you have a wireless access point on a LAN, which can be all wireless or mixed wired and wireless. You don't want it wide open to just any random person with a desire to snoop on your network or "borrow" your bandwidth, but you want some access controls and security. Your access point should have a unique SSID (service set identifier), WEP (wireless equivalent privacy) or WPA/WPA2 (Wi-fi protected access) set up and working, and either a DHCP server or a pool of assigned IP addresses for clients.
Linux

Creating DjVu Documents Linux HOWTO

Post date: July 16, 2006, 16:07 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4685 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document explains some of the uses of djvulibre implementation of DjVu for creating quality DjVu documents in linux. DjVu format features bitmap document compression and hypertext structure. It is used by numerous web sites all around the world for storing and distributing digital documents including scanned documents and high-resolution pictures. One of the advantages of DjVu files is that they are notably small, often smaller than PDF or JPEG files with the same content. This makes DjVu a helpful tool for digitizing books and journals, especially scientific ones.

Below it is considered the case when a DjVu document is created from a number of separate JPEG files each containing a single page. Here JPEG format is not a limitation, and the examples can cover arbitrary image formats. Conversion from PDF to DjVu is also discussed. Usage of scanner software is not explained: refer to the relevant documentation.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink