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Search results for Howto upgrade kernel(2.6.22-9-generic) in Feisty Fawn

Ubuntu

How to get ath5k working on Jaunty with Compat-wireless and a self-compiled kernel

Post date: May 27, 2009, 07:05 Category: Software Views: 3254 Comments
Tutorial quote: I used to have some trouble while setting up my Atheros PCI card on Ubuntu Linux 9.04. It worked natively on Ubuntu 8.04, where it was detected as ath0. I upgraded from 8.04 to 8.10 whereby I noticed my wireless PCI card didn’t work natively anymore. Someone suggested me to upgrade from 8.10 to 9.04 Jaunty, and I did that immediately. After the system upgrade I noticed again that my wireless device was gone in Ubuntu 9.04. When I ran iwconfig I didn’t see wlan0 or ath0 anymore.

Ubuntu

Using KVM On Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon)

Post date: December 2, 2007, 11:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3095 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this HowTo I will explain how to install and use KVM for running your services in virtual machines. KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) is a Linux kernel virtualization technique that provides full virtualization by using Intel VT (Vanderpool) or AMD-V (Pacifica).
Fedora

How To Upgrade From Fedora 14 To Fedora 15 (Desktop & Server)

Post date: May 25, 2011, 10:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2004 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article describes how you can upgrade your Fedora 14 system to Fedora 15. The upgrade procedure works for both desktop and server installations.
OpenBSD

Rebuilding the OpenBSD kernel

Post date: April 24, 2005, 20:04 Category: System Views: 4110 Comments
Tutorial quote: Users who want their OpenBSD machine to perform specific functions or need additional device drivers might want to customize their kernel. In other OS's, like some types of Linux, it is very popular to rebuild the kernel because the default is so bloated. For most users, the default OpenBSD kernel is sufficient; however, you should still apply kernel patches, which will require rebuilding and installing a fresh kernel.
OpenSUSE

Write your own kernel module and insert it into running kernel

Post date: January 12, 2009, 08:01 Category: Programming Views: 4520 Comments
Tutorial quote: So, you want to write a kernel module. You know C, you've written a few normal programs to run as processes, and now you want to get to where the real action is, to where a single wild pointer can wipe out your file system and a core dump means a reboot.

kernel Modules are pieces of code that can be loaded and unloaded into the kernel upon demand. They extend the functionality of the kernel without the need to reboot the system. For example, one type of module is the device driver, which allows the kernel to access hardware connected to the system.
Linux

Three tools to help you configure iptables

Post date: May 25, 2005, 14:05 Category: Network Views: 3110 Comments
Tutorial quote: Every user whose client connects to the Internet should configure his firewall immediately after installation. Some Linux distributions include firewall configuration as a part of installation, often offering a set of defaults configurations to choose from. However, to ensure that your machine presents the minimum "attack surface" (a measure of the number of vulnerable ports, user accounts, and sockets exposed to attack) to the predatory inhabitants of the Internet, you may need to do some manual configuration of your firewall. Here are three tools that can help.
The Linux kernel (version 2.4 onwards) contains a framework for packet filtering and firewalling using netfilter and iptables. Netfilter is a set of hooks inside the Linux kernel that allows kernel modules to register callback functions with the network stack. Iptables is a generic table structure for the definition of rulesets. Each rule within an IP table consists of a number of classifiers (iptables matches) and one connected action (iptables target). Iptables has extensive documentation that can be accessed online or by typing man iptables at the command line. Yet despite the depth of the documentation available for iptables, its complexity can be baffling.
OpenSUSE

HowTo: Install configure KVM Virtualization & run Guest OSes in openSUSE

Post date: September 30, 2008, 21:09 Category: Emulation Views: 5982 Comments
Tutorial quote: Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) is a Linux kernel virtualization infrastructure. KVM is a full virtualization solution for Linux on x86 hardware containing virtualization extensions Intel VT (vmx) or AMD-V (svm). It consists of a loadable kernel module, kvm.ko, that provides the core virtualization infrastructure and a processor specific module, kvm-intel.ko or kvm-amd.ko. KVM also requires a modified QEMU although work is underway to get the required changes upstream.
Ubuntu

Simple Guide How to Upgrade Ubuntu Hardy Heron to Ubuntu Intrepid Ibix

Post date: October 31, 2008, 07:10 Category: System Views: 3727 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial will explain how to Upgrade Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron) to Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibix) released on the 30th of October 2008.By default Ubuntu 8.04 LTS will not offer a upgrade to 8.10. This is because the 8.04 LTS version is a long term support release and 8.10 is a regular release. Upgrades from 8.04 LTS to 8.10 are fully supported, of course, and easy to enable.
OpenSUSE

How to Upgrade to latest Firefox on openSUSE

Post date: September 26, 2008, 16:09 Category: Installing Views: 2910 Comments
Tutorial quote: In order to have the latest Firefox running on your box, you need to add a repository to your system so that whenever a new version of Firefox is released we can simply upgrade it without any pain.
Linux

LCD displays easy to use and easy to build

Post date: May 24, 2005, 18:05 Category: Hardware Views: 3297 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article presents now the "basic" model: LCD display and 2 buttons; simple and easy to build for everybody.

Lcdproc used to be at the very beginning a program to display some statistics (cpu load, uptime, time, ...) on an external LCD display. Over time it has however evolved into a much more generic solution. Today the lcdproc package contains LCDd, a generic server and LCD driver, plus many clients. One of those clients is still the actual executable called lcdproc which still shows server statistics however there are also others. This client server architecture has the big advantage that you do not need to write your client in a specific language. You just need to use the simple ascii protocol between client and server.
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