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FreeBSD

Step by Step Install AtMail Open On FreeBSD

Post date: July 5, 2008, 10:07 Category: Installing Views: 6683 Comments
Tutorial quote: Step by Step Install AtMail Open On FreeBSD
Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 11.04 Server

Post date: May 10, 2011, 11:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2541 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tool that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 11.04 KVM server.
Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 10.10 Server

Post date: November 30, 2010, 12:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2592 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tool that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 10.10 KVM server.
Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 8.10 Server

Post date: March 10, 2009, 12:03 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4067 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tool that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 8.10 KVM server.
Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 11.10 Server

Post date: November 27, 2011, 11:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 27484 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tools that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 11.10 KVM server.
Linux

How To Back Up MySQL Databases Without Interrupting MySQL

Post date: May 12, 2007, 23:05 Category: System Views: 3612 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article describes how you can back up MySQL databases without interrupting the MySQL service. Normally, when you want to create a MySQL backup, you either have to stop MySQL or issue a read lock on your MySQL tables in order to get a correct backup; if you do not do it this way, you can end up with an inconsistent backup. To get consistent backups without interrupting MySQL, I use a little trick: I replicate my MySQL database to a second MySQL server, and on the second MySQL server I use a cron job that creates regular backups of the replicated database.
FreeBSD

Using Software RAID-1 with FreeBSD

Post date: November 29, 2005, 03:11 Category: System Views: 3684 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you ever needed a software RAID solution for a low-end server install? Perhaps you've wanted your workstation to take advantage of the redundancy provided by a disk mirror without investing in a hardware RAID controller. Has a prior painful configuration experience turned you off software RAID altogether on Unix systems?


Since 5.3-Release, FreeBSD comes with gmirror(8), which allows you to easily configure a software RAID 1 solution. While tutorials on gmirror exist, I found them to require either manual calculations of partition sizes with bsdlabel or the use of a fix-it floppy on an existing system.

It made more sense to me to configure RAID during the install of the operating system. I also wanted a procedure that was easy to follow and didn't introduce human error in the form of a math miscalculation. After cobbling together the available documentation and experimenting my way through various configurations, I came across a procedure that has worked well for me on several different systems. I also received valuable feedback from Pawel Jakub Dawidek, the author of gmirror, who gave some insight into some of the not yet documented features of gmirror.
Linux

Tunneling MySQL connections through SSH

Post date: January 2, 2007, 20:01 Category: Security Views: 3460 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is a description of how to set up a secure tunnel between your MySQL Server and a locally running MySQL Administrator using Putty. By creating a secure tunnel to your MySQL server using Putty, you can grant localhost access to powerful applications like MySQL Administrator while at the same time, make your server appear as if it isn't even there. In effect, make your MySQL server disappear from the outside world.
Debian

How To Install VMware Server On Debian Sarge

Post date: November 1, 2006, 18:11 Category: Installing Views: 3021 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install the free VMware Server (version 1.0.1) on a Debian Sarge system. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems (virtual machines) such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. In this article we use Debian Sarge (3.1) as the host operating system.
FreeBSD

Startup in FreeBSD

Post date: December 31, 2007, 18:12 Category: System Views: 3949 Comments
Tutorial quote: rc.d is place for startup related server program. See the example to see how it works.
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