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Search results for Installing A Bind9 Master/Slave DNS System

Debian

High-Availability Load Balancer With HAProxy/Wackamole/Spread On Debian Etch

Post date: January 6, 2009, 12:01 Category: Installing Views: 4313 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy, Wackamole, and Spread on Debian Etch. The load balancer sits between the user and two (or more) backend Apache web servers that hold the same content. Not only does the load balancer distribute the requests to the two backend Apache servers, it also checks the health of the backend servers. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining backend server. In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using Wackamole and Spread, and if the master fails, the slave becomes the master, which means the users will not notice any disruption of the service. HAProxy is session-aware, which means you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions (such as forums, shopping carts, etc.).
Debian

Setting Up A High-Availability Load Balancer (With Failover and Session Support) With HAProxy/Heartbeat On Debian Etch

Post date: November 7, 2007, 11:11 Category: Network Views: 5314 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy and heartbeat on Debian Etch. The load balancer sits between the user and two (or more) backend Apache web servers that hold the same content. Not only does the load balancer distribute the requests to the two backend Apache servers, it also checks the health of the backend servers. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining backend server. In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using heartbeat, and if the master fails, the slave becomes the master, which means the users will not notice any disruption of the service. HAProxy is session-aware, which means you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions (such as forums, shopping carts, etc.).
Debian

Setting Up A High-Availability Load Balancer (With Failover and Session Support) With HAProxy/Keepalived On Debian Etch

Post date: October 29, 2007, 09:10 Category: Network Views: 5408 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to set up a two-node load balancer in an active/passive configuration with HAProxy and keepalived on Debian Etch. The load balancer sits between the user and two (or more) backend Apache web servers that hold the same content. Not only does the load balancer distribute the requests to the two backend Apache servers, it also checks the health of the backend servers. If one of them is down, all requests will automatically be redirected to the remaining backend server. In addition to that, the two load balancer nodes monitor each other using keepalived, and if the master fails, the slave becomes the master, which means the users will not notice any disruption of the service. HAProxy is session-aware, which means you can use it with any web application that makes use of sessions (such as forums, shopping carts, etc.).
FreeBSD

Creating A DNS Cache With djbdns

Post date: May 5, 2007, 22:05 Category: Installing Views: 4433 Comments
Tutorial quote: Building a local DNS cache will speed up your internet connection since the time for the translation job (converting domain names into IP addresses) will become negligible with the assumption that the DNS cache gets the information from the parent DNS.
Debian

Speedup DNS requests with a local cache

Post date: April 26, 2006, 09:04 Category: Network Views: 3352 Comments
Tutorial quote: One common server bottleneck is DNS lookups. Many common server tasks such as from looking up hostnames to write Apache logfiles and processing incoming mail require the use of DNS queries. If you're running a high-traffic system it might be useful to cache previous lookups.
Unix+clones

DNS Common Abuses

Post date: April 17, 2005, 09:04 Category: Security Views: 3005 Comments
Tutorial quote: In paper I have present several features of DNS to make the reader familiar with the basics of the Domain Name System. I have also covered several well known and wide spread attacks that are used to exploit DNS. These attacks are by no means theoretical. In truth they grow more and more common as attackers become more sophisticated. The suggested defense methods outlined at the end of each section cover only the basic recommendations that can be used to thwart attackers.
Fedora

Installing MyDNS & MyDNSConfig 3 On Fedora 10

Post date: May 24, 2009, 11:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4225 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial I will describe how to install and configure MyDNS and MyDNSConfig 3 on Fedora 10. MyDNS is a DNS server that uses a MySQL database as backend instead of configuration files like, for example, Bind or djbdns. MyDNSConfig is an easy to use web-based interface to MyDNS. MyDNSConfig can create all types of DNS records that are available in MyDNS and adds features like user management and access privileges.
Debian

Installing MyDNS-NG & MyDNSConfig 3 On Debian Lenny

Post date: April 9, 2009, 11:04 Category: Installing Views: 3941 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial I will describe how to install and configure MyDNS-NG and MyDNSConfig 3 on Debian Lenny. MyDNS-NG is a DNS server that uses a MySQL database as backend instead of configuration files like, for example, Bind or djbdns. MyDNSConfig is an easy to use web-based interface to MyDNS-NG. MyDNSConfig can create all types of DNS records that are available in MyDNS and adds features like user management and access privileges.
Fedora+Core

Resolving Domains Internally And Externally With Bind9 And Caching Nameserver

Post date: February 11, 2007, 19:02 Category: Network Views: 9246 Comments
Tutorial quote: Sometimes, we are required to resolve our internal domains on a local nameserver and external (internet) domains on our ISP's nameserver. There are different solutions to this problem, but in this tutorial, we are going to solve it through configuring a combination of caching-nameserver and BIND 9.
CentOS

Installing Xen On CentOS 5.2 (i386)

Post date: November 9, 2008, 12:11 Category: Installing Views: 5622 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a CentOS 5.2 system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
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