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Search results for Installing The Native Linux Flash Player 9 On Ubuntu

Ubuntu

Installing The Native Linux Flash Player 9 On Ubuntu

Post date: January 17, 2007, 23:01 Category: Desktop Views: 3687 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article describes how to install the new native Linux Flash Player 9 from Adobe on an Ubuntu Edgy Eft desktop so that it can be used within Firefox. The procedure works for other Ubuntu versions and Debian as well.
Ubuntu

Flash Player 9 on Linux (Ubuntu Dapper Drake)

Post date: August 29, 2006, 15:08 Category: Multimedia Views: 4421 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to install the Flash player on a Linux system. It was tested on Dapper Drake (on an x86 - 32 bit machine).
Fedora

How To Install Adobe Flash Player 10 into Firefox 3 under Fedora 9

Post date: October 4, 2008, 17:10 Category: Software Views: 3892 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Flash Player has been improved to support new and cool internet browsing features such as 3D effects, advanced 3D layouts and more. You can visit Adobe Flash Player 10 cool features here.
Ubuntu

Flash Player 8.5 Linux (Ubuntu Dapper Drake)

Post date: May 19, 2006, 22:05 Category: Multimedia Views: 3558 Comments
Tutorial quote: Installing Flash 8.5 plugin for firefox using wine on Ubuntu Dapper Drake.
SuSe

Adobe Flash Player 10 installation on OpenSuSe

Post date: November 16, 2008, 06:11 Category: Installing Views: 5420 Comments
Tutorial quote: With Flash Player 10, Adobe is focusing on building "expressive" applications for the Web, said Tom Barclay, Adobe senior product marketing manager for Flash Player. Applications can be deployed including online video, rich Internet applications, online games, and other interactive experiences.
Ubuntu

How To Enable Adobe's Flash Player In Google Chrome (Ubuntu 9.04)

Post date: August 27, 2009, 09:08 Category: Desktop Views: 2570 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how you can install the Google Chrome browser on Ubuntu 9.04 and how to enable the Adobe Flash plugin in it. Please note that Google Chrome for Ubuntu is still in alpha state and should not be used on production systems.
Ubuntu

Build Your Own Video Community With Lighttpd And FlowPlayer (Ubuntu 9.10)

Post date: March 16, 2010, 12:03 Category: Installing Views: 3170 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article shows how you can build your own video community using lighttpd with its mod_flv_streaming module (for streaming .flv videos, the format used by most major video communities such as YouTube) and its mod_secdownload module (for preventing hotlinking of the videos) on Ubuntu 9.10. I will use FlowPlayer as the video player, a free Flash video player with support for lighttpd's mod_flv_streaming module. I will also show how you can encode videos (.mp4 .mov .mpg .3gp .mpeg .wmv .avi) to the FLV format supported by Adobe Flash.
Ubuntu

How to Enable Flash Support for Chromium in Ubuntu Linux

Post date: July 19, 2009, 13:07 Category: Optimizing Views: 4110 Comments
Tutorial quote: Though you can now enable Flash on Google Chrome for Mac, the Linux still doesn't have support. However, if you're willing to run Chromium instead of the official Google build, you're in luck.

Using a current version of Chromium from Launchpad, adding Flash to the speedy browser is a breeze. H3g3m0n posted a tutorial on how to enable Flash in Chromium but that post is outdated and some more tweaking needs to be done for this to work:
Debian

Installing Debian onto USB flash media with everything encrypted

Post date: September 28, 2005, 16:09 Category: Security Views: 6899 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is a simple procedure for installing Debian GNU/Linux onto a USB key flash media. It includes several configuration changes but tries to stay as close to a default debian install as possible.

This is useful for administrators that need to carry sensitive information or people concerned about their privacy.
OpenSUSE

Clive - Download videos from YouTube & other video sharing websites

Post date: August 15, 2008, 22:08 Category: Multimedia Views: 3322 Comments
Tutorial quote: clive is an open source command line tool to extract videos and to bypass the need to use Adobe Flash in order to view user-generated content available on video-sharing websites. Clive supports Youtube, GoogleVideo, Dailymotion, metacafe, Guba, Sevenload, Myvideo. Clive converts the downloaded Flash Video into a MP4 file avoiding the need of having a Flash Video Player.
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