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Search results for Installing Xen 3.0 upon Debian Unstable, with a custom Kernel

Debian

Virtualization With Xen On Debian Lenny (AMD64)

Post date: February 8, 2009, 13:02 Category: Installing Views: 3255 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a Debian Lenny (5.0) system (AMD64). Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Debian

Paravirtualization With Xen 4.0 On Debian Squeeze (AMD64)

Post date: March 31, 2011, 09:03 Category: Installing Views: 2940 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen 4.0 on a Debian Squeeze (6.0) system (AMD64) and create paravirtualized guests. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Debian

Xen Cluster Management With Ganeti On Debian Etch

Post date: September 16, 2007, 21:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3171 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ganeti is a cluster virtualization management system based on Xen. In this tutorial I will explain how to create one virtual Xen machine (called an instance) on a cluster of two physical nodes, and how to manage and failover this instance between the two physical nodes.
Debian

Xen Cluster Management With Ganeti On Debian Lenny

Post date: March 3, 2009, 12:03 Category: Installing Views: 3887 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ganeti is a cluster virtualization management system based on Xen. In this tutorial I will explain how to create one virtual Xen machine (called an instance) on a cluster of two physical nodes, and how to manage and failover this instance between the two physical nodes.
CentOS

Installing Xen On CentOS 5.2 (i386)

Post date: November 9, 2008, 12:11 Category: Installing Views: 4917 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a CentOS 5.2 system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Debian

Avoiding slow package updates with package diffs

Post date: September 18, 2006, 13:09 Category: Network Views: 2956 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you're using the unstable or testing distribution of Debian GNU/Linux you will almost certainly have noticed that apt-get uses daily-diffs for its package updates. In many common situtations this is more bandwidth efficient, however it isn't always appropriate.

apt-get is a standard command which is used by many Debian users to manage package installation, and upgrades. (Although there are also other package managers such as synaptic, or aptitude.)
Debian

Building Kernel Modules With Module-Assistant On Debian Lenny

Post date: January 26, 2010, 12:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3241 Comments
Tutorial quote: module-assistant is a tool for building Debian kernel modules from source, without having to rebuild the whole kernel. It fetches module-source packages that have been prepared for the Debian distribution via apt and produces .deb packages. This tutorial shows how to use module-assistant in command-line mode and in interactive mode.
OpenSUSE

Write your own kernel module and insert it into running kernel

Post date: January 12, 2009, 08:01 Category: Programming Views: 4522 Comments
Tutorial quote: So, you want to write a kernel module. You know C, you've written a few normal programs to run as processes, and now you want to get to where the real action is, to where a single wild pointer can wipe out your file system and a core dump means a reboot.

kernel Modules are pieces of code that can be loaded and unloaded into the kernel upon demand. They extend the functionality of the kernel without the need to reboot the system. For example, one type of module is the device driver, which allows the kernel to access hardware connected to the system.
Ubuntu

Installing Xen On An Ubuntu Feisty Fawn Server From The Ubuntu Repositories

Post date: June 30, 2007, 00:06 Category: Installing Views: 3204 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on an Ubuntu Feisty Fawn (Ubuntu 7.04) server system (i386). You can find all the software used here in the Ubuntu repositories, so no external files or compilation are needed. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0).
Debian

How To Enable Networking In Xen Guests On Hetzner's New EQ Servers (Debian Lenny)

Post date: October 27, 2009, 23:10 Category: Network Views: 5296 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can enable networking in Xen guests (domU) on Hetzner's new EQ servers. With the new EQ servers, you can get up to three additional IPs that are in the same subnet as the server's main IP. The problem is that these additional IPs are bound to the MAC address of the host system (dom0) - Hetzner's routers will dump IP packets if they come from an unknown MAC address. This means we cannot use Xen's bridged mode, but must switch to Xen's routed mode where the host system (dom0) acts as the gateway for the guests.
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