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Debian

Installing Debian

Post date: September 30, 2005, 16:09 Category: Installing Views: 2752 Comments
Tutorial quote: The experience of installing Debian can vary widely depending on your hardware and requirements. There simply isn't room here to provide a comprehensive installation guide. Instead, you'll find an outline of the major points of the installation process, and plenty of information about where to go and what to do when things don't work as expected.

While Debian has a great reputation for day-to-day use, it has a poor (and not entirely unmerited) reputation for ease of installation. However, with the Debian 3.1 release, code-named Sarge, the developers have taken major steps to improve the installation experience, so don't be afraid.

Perhaps the best advice I can give concerning Debian installation is to not expect to always get it right the first time. If you're ready to start over and experiment, you'll soon become happy with the installation process.
Debian

Full Mail Server Solution With Virtual Domains & Users (Debian Etch, Postfix, MySQL, DoveCot, DSpam, ClamAV, Postgrey, RBL)

Post date: October 31, 2007, 09:10 Category: Installing Views: 4045 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide describes how to set up a full email solution in Debian Linux (all code is from Debian Etch). I was asked to design a secure, scalable, portable solution for a small company. While the guide references many servers, the company only had 4 physical machines, Xen was used to virtualize the entire solution. That particular aspect of the system is not discussed in this guide, although I will try to get it into the next revision.
Linux

Custom Monitoring MySQL and SNMP with BixData

Post date: February 3, 2007, 00:02 Category: Software Views: 3202 Comments
Tutorial quote: With BixData you can monitor your servers as well as VMware and Xen. BixData includes pre-built plugins for things like CPU, Memory, Disk, etc. but any good monitoring tool needs to be customizable. BixData includes the basic ability to run scripts and record their exit values, similar to Nagios Plugins. BixData 2.7 adds support for importing data in more complex formats. This allows you to monitor almost anything. I'll go through the steps showing you how to monitor MySQL locally where an agent is installed and then the steps to monitor a device remotely through SNMP. The advantage of BixData is that any data available through a BixAgent works with the standard tools such as the situation room, scoreboards, notifications and the reporting system. All data are stored in standard SQL tables and are easily accessible.
Debian

Creating an initrd image

Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: System Views: 3289 Comments
Tutorial quote: When I started booting a box with multiple SCSI adapters, I wanted to keep the device ordering sane. I find it’s best when the boot ordering matches the order in which Linux initializes the drivers for each controller. One effective way to handle this under Debian GNU/Linux with one of the stock kernels is to create a custom initrd image.
Debian

Stack Smashing Protection for Debian

Post date: June 23, 2006, 22:06 Category: Security Views: 2872 Comments
Tutorial quote: Since we last covered the use of Stack Smashing Protection (SSP) the default compiler for Debian Sid has been upgraded to include it, with no need for custom patching. Read on for a brief demonstration of how it can be used to prevent attacks.

The default C compiler for Sid, which will be used in Etch too, is GCC v4.1. This releasecontains the SSP patch which previously needed to be applied manually (we demonstrated applying this patch for GCC v3.4 a long time ago).

Since the SSP patch is included in the compiler by default it is suddenly a lot easier to start working with it.
Linux

Building a Virtual Cluster with Xen

Post date: September 28, 2006, 04:09 Category: Emulation Views: 7496 Comments
Tutorial quote: It is a common practice to have development and test servers for each production server, so that you can experiment with changes without the fear of breaking anything important, but this is usually not feasible with clusters. So how do you try that new version of your favorite program before committing it to the production cluster? A cheap and convenient possibility is to build a virtual cluster.

Thanks to the Xen virtual machine monitor, you can create a number of virtual machines, all running simultaneously in your computer, install different operating systems in them, or just different configurations, and connect them via (virtual) network cards. Xen is a terrific tool for building virtual Beowulf clusters. It can prove useful when learning or teaching about clusters or for testing new features/software without the fear of causing major damage to an existing cluster.
Ubuntu

Installing Xbox Media Center (XBMC) On Ubuntu 8.04

Post date: October 7, 2008, 11:10 Category: Desktop Views: 3758 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Xbox Media Center (XBMC) is a media center application for Linux, Mac, and Windows that allows you to manage/watch/listen to/view your videos, music, and pictures. It has a nice interface, can be controlled from the desktop or a remote control or via its built-in web interface, and it can be extended by custom scripts. This guide shows how you can install XBMC on an Ubuntu 8.04 desktop.
RedHat

Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4

Post date: July 18, 2005, 22:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 7477 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
Debian

Installing Debian Etch From A Windows System With

Post date: September 27, 2007, 10:09 Category: Installing Views: 3133 Comments
Tutorial quote: Debian-Installer Loader is a Debian Etch installer for Windows which adds an entry to the boot menu that allows you to start the Debian installation. Unlike the Ubuntu installation with Wubi, real Debian partitions are created during the installation. In the end, you have a dual-boot system (Windows/Debian).
Linux

Compiling Your Own Kernel

Post date: May 1, 2005, 17:05 Category: System Views: 2400 Comments
Tutorial quote: Once I decided to take the plunge and go for it, I realised it's not too hard at all. As long as you have a bootable floppy or CD to boot from if your new kernel doesn't work, you'll be OK.

For this simple guide, I'll assume that you use LILO as your boot manager.
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