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Search results for Installing Xen On CentOS 5.0 (i386)

CentOS

Installing Xen On CentOS 5.0 (i386)

Post date: June 10, 2007, 22:06 Category: Installing Views: 4260 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a CentOS 5.0 system (i386). Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
CentOS

Installing Xen On CentOS 5.2 (i386)

Post date: November 9, 2008, 12:11 Category: Installing Views: 4871 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a CentOS 5.2 system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Ubuntu

Installing Xen On An Ubuntu 8.04 Server From The Ubuntu Repositories

Post date: May 8, 2008, 10:05 Category: Installing Views: 3021 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on an Ubuntu Hardy Heron (Ubuntu 8.04) server system (i386). You can find all the software used here in the Ubuntu repositories, so no external files (apart from a fixed Ubuntu Xen kernel to enable networking for the virtual machines) or compilation are needed.
Ubuntu

Installing Xen On An Ubuntu 7.10 Server From The Ubuntu Repositories

Post date: November 6, 2007, 10:11 Category: Installing Views: 3299 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on an Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon (Ubuntu 7.10) server system (i386). You can find all the software used here in the Ubuntu repositories, so no external files or compilation are needed.
Ubuntu

Installing Xen On An Ubuntu Feisty Fawn Server From The Ubuntu Repositories

Post date: June 30, 2007, 00:06 Category: Installing Views: 3166 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on an Ubuntu Feisty Fawn (Ubuntu 7.04) server system (i386). You can find all the software used here in the Ubuntu repositories, so no external files or compilation are needed. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0).
CentOS

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.6 (x86_64)

Post date: May 24, 2011, 10:05 Category: Installing Views: 2446 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.6 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
CentOS

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.4 (x86_64)

Post date: December 15, 2009, 12:12 Category: Installing Views: 3955 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.4 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
Debian

Installing Xen 3.0 upon Debian Unstable, with a custom Kernel

Post date: December 29, 2005, 07:12 Category: System Views: 3481 Comments
Tutorial quote: Recently we demonstrated the process of installing a binary release of Xen 3.0 on Sarge, since the packages on Debian Unstable are not yet available for Xen 3.0 we're now going to look at installing it via the packages provided by Ralph Passgang. This also includes building a custom Xen kernel from source.

The advantage to building the Xen kernel from source is that you can add, or remove, drivers - so the kernel is utterly customised for your system.
CentOS

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.3 (x86_64)

Post date: May 17, 2009, 13:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4651 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.3 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Debian

Managing Xen With Xen-Tools, Xen-Shell, And Argo

Post date: November 5, 2006, 21:11 Category: System Views: 4236 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide describes how to install and use xen-tools, xen-shell, and Argo on a Debian system. All three packages provide useful tools for the administration of virtual Xen machines. Xen-tools is a collection of Perl scripts that allow you to easily create, update, and delete Xen guest domains. The xen-shell provides a command-line interface to owners of Xen domains so that they can manage their Xen domains without the help of the server administrator. And with Argo, you can control Xen domains through a web interface or through a menu on the command line.
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