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Unix+clones

OpenOffice 2.0: Creating database forms

Post date: December 13, 2005, 12:12 Category: Software Views: 3730 Comments
Tutorial quote: ather than having a shallow affair with OpenOffice 2.0, we can use it to get a little more intimate with the data. We can even badger it into forming relations. Why force your database tables into a marriage with OpenOffice? Because, as with human relations, life -- and data -- are pretty meaningless without tight connections.

This tip on creating forms is part of a series I'm writing on OpenOffice.org 2.0 Base. So far, I've discussed making a plain database from scratch, creating tables, entering data using the table editor and a simple form and creating a view of a table or tables.

Let's start off with a description of what table relations are anyway, then discuss how to create a data entry form like this one, which has data from two related tables.
Debian

Installing Debian

Post date: September 30, 2005, 16:09 Category: Installing Views: 3470 Comments
Tutorial quote: The experience of installing Debian can vary widely depending on your hardware and requirements. There simply isn't room here to provide a comprehensive installation guide. Instead, you'll find an outline of the major points of the installation process, and plenty of information about where to go and what to do when things don't work as expected.

While Debian has a great reputation for day-to-day use, it has a poor (and not entirely unmerited) reputation for ease of installation. However, with the Debian 3.1 release, code-named Sarge, the developers have taken major steps to improve the installation experience, so don't be afraid.

Perhaps the best advice I can give concerning Debian installation is to not expect to always get it right the first time. If you're ready to start over and experiment, you'll soon become happy with the installation process.
Linux

Hardening Linux: a 10 step approach to a secure server

Post date: June 22, 2005, 10:06 Category: Security Views: 4409 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Internet has become a far more dangerous place than it was 20 years ago. Nowadays, Operating System and application security is an integral part of a server configuration and, while firewalls are very important, they are not the panacea.

This list of steps is intended as a guideline with a practical approach. We’ll try to provide a complete picture without getting into unnecesary details. This list won’t replace a good book on secure systems administration, but it will be useful as a quick guide.

Before we get started it’s worth to mention that security is not a status: it’s just a process. The correct initial setup of the server only provides a good start and helps you get half the way through. But you actually need to walk the other half of the road, by providing proper security vigilance, monitoring and updating.
Debian

Creating a Wiki with kwiki

Post date: December 17, 2005, 22:12 Category: Software Views: 3468 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wikis are simple interactive websites which are extremely easy to use for storing easily updated text content. Using a Wiki you can easily create a lot of content with hyperlinks between them. Debian has packaged several different Wiki systems and here we'll look at installing just one of them: KWiki.

Wikis have become familiar to many people thanks to the popularity of large sites such as Wikipedia and can be very useful for creating collaborative websites.

Whilst there are many Wiki packages included in the Debian GNU/Linux distribution I've always had a soft spot for KWiki due to its simplicity, Perl nature, and low requirements.

Installing the software under Debian is very simple and we will show how to setup a new installation using the Debian Apache2 webserver package.
Linux

Xen Virtualization and Linux Clustering, Part 1

Post date: January 21, 2006, 06:01 Category: System Views: 4527 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you heard about Xen virtualization and want to get some hands-on experience? Do you want to experiment with Linux clustering but only have a single computer to devote to the cause? If you answered yes to either of these questions, keep reading.

In this article, I briefly introduce the concepts of Xen virtualization and Linux clustering. From there, I show you how to set up multiple operating systems on a single computer using Xen and how to configure them for use with clustering. I should point out that a cluster implemented in this manner does not provide the computational power of multiple physical computers. It does, however, offer a way to prototype a cluster as well as provide a cost-effective development environment for cluster-based software. Even if you're not interested in clustering, this article gives you hands-on experience using Xen virtualization.
Unix+clones

Execute Commands on Multiple Linux or UNIX Servers part II

Post date: December 28, 2005, 10:12 Category: System Views: 4141 Comments
Tutorial quote: I have already covered how to execute commands on multiple Linux or UNIX servers via shell script. The disadvantage of script is commands do not run in parallel on all servers. However, several tools exist to automate this procedure in parallel. With the help of tool called tentakel, you run distributed command execution. It is a program for executing the same command on many hosts in parallel using ssh (it supports other methods too). Main advantage is you can create several sets of servers according requirements. For example webserver group, mail server group, home servers group etc. The command is executed in parallel on all servers in this group (time saving). By default, every result is printed to stdout (screen). The output format can be defined for each group.
Linux

Arcane Linux Commands: dc

Post date: December 31, 2007, 01:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4380 Comments
Tutorial quote: If anybody within earshot of you is struggling to learn sed and ever remarks "This is like learning Klingon! Could they make it any more cryptic?", you can always point them to dc.

dc is the command-line Unix "Reverse-Polish Notation"(RPN) calculator. The name stands for "desktop calculator". OK, so what is a Polish calculator and why would you want to reverse one? The math that you do in school uses infix notation, with the operator between the numbers (3 + 5). Prefix notation puts the operator first (+ 3 5) and is what the Lisp language uses. The prefix notation is known as "Polish notation" after the nationality of Jan Łukasiewicz who invented it. Postfix notation, then, has the operator at the rear (3 5 +), and so is also the reverse of Polish notation.

What's the difference? In computer programming, you have to specify what order you want a multi-part calculation to be in. Everybody is familiar with the old problem of A*B-C. For A=5, B=3, C=2, multiplying first and subtracting second gives you 13, while subtracting first and multiplying second gives you 5. To specify which operations you want performed first, you have to either memorize the complex orders of operations (which change from one language to the next) or use a lot of parenthesis ((A*B)-C) or (A*(B-C)). Hey, that's what everybody complains about in all those languages that use parenthesis!
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems Part II

Post date: January 6, 2006, 22:01 Category: Benchmarks Views: 5566 Comments
Tutorial quote: After the last article was published, I have received more than a dozen requests for a second filesystem benchmark using the 2.6 kernel. Since that time, I have converted entirely to XFS for every Linux machine I use, so I may be a bit bias regarding the XFS filesystem. I tried to keep the hardware roughly the same. Instead of a Western Digital 250GB and Promise ATA/100 controller, I am now am using a Seagate 400GB and Maxtor ATA/133 Promise controller. The physical machine remains the same, there is an additional 664MB of swap and I am now running Debian Etch. In the previous article, I was running Slackware 9.1 with custom compiled filesystem utilities. I've added a small section in the beginning that shows the filesystem creation and mount time, I've also added a graph showing these new benchmarks. After the first round of benchmarks, I received a sleuth of e-mails asking for the raw numbers. The numbers are now included in tables at the end of this e-mail for both the last and current set of benchmarks.
Arch

Installing Vmware

Post date: April 14, 2005, 09:04 Category: Software Views: 9629 Comments
Tutorial quote: VMware installs on ArchLinux pretty well, but its not totally straight forward.
FreeBSD

Installing ProFTPD

Post date: August 26, 2005, 13:08 Category: Network Views: 4103 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document is about replacing the standard ftpd from the FreeBSD kernel with the fancier ProFTPd.
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