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Search results for Installing and configuring FireHOL - Part 2

Debian

Installing ionCube

Post date: August 11, 2011, 21:08 Category: Benchmarks Views: 4380 Comments
Tutorial quote: ionCube protects software written using the PHP programming language from being viewed, changed, and run on unlicensed computers.
OpenBSD

Quickly installing OpenBSD 3.3

Post date: May 1, 2005, 17:05 Category: Installing Views: 6804 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article goes through the steps of an OpenBSD 3.3 installation. The installer is a text-based interface and, in most cases, is quick and easy to complete.
Gentoo

Proftpd with mysql authentication, software qouta, traffic shaper and SSL

Post date: May 26, 2005, 17:05 Category: Network Views: 4565 Comments
Tutorial quote: A short, but detailed howto about installing ProFTPD with all the bells and whistles on Gentoo.
FreeBSD

Installing FreeBSD on IBM Netvista S40

Post date: May 8, 2005, 21:05 Category: Installing Views: 4315 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this note we shall talk about installing FreeBSD on a very interesting and elegant machine: IBM Netvista S40. In its creator own terminology, it is "legacy-free". The computer has no parallel, serial, AT keyboard, nor PS/2 mouse ports. No floppy controller either. Instead, it has 5 USB ports (2 frontal and 3 rear) connected to a single USB controller. Besides these USB ports, the system only counts with standard video and audio connectors. The video controller is Intel 82810E SVGA and audio chip is Intel ICH 82801AA, both integrated onboard. The CPU is Intel PIII at 866MHz. The machine is further equipped with a fast Intel Pro PCI network adapter containing a PXE/RIPL boot prom. A quiet 20G Quantum Fireball HDD and a Liteon ATAPI CD-ROM, both connected as masters, constitute the storage subsystem. The case is Flex ATX, a small form factor.
Linux

Creating Really Teensy ELF Executables for Linux

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3428 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you're a programmer who's become fed up with software bloat, then may you find herein the perfect antidote.

This document explores methods for squeezing excess bytes out of simple programs. (Of course, the more practical purpose of this document is to describe a few of the inner workings of the ELF file format and the Linux operating system. But hopefully you can also learn something about how to make really teensy ELF executables in the process.)

Please note that the information and examples given here are, for the most part, specific to ELF executables on a Linux platform running under an Intel-386 architecture. I imagine that a good bit of the information is applicable to other ELF-based Unices, but my experiences with such are too limited for me to say with certainty.

The assembly code that appears in this document is written for use with Nasm. (Besides being more appropriate for our needs, Nasm's syntax beats the hell out of AT&T syntax for anyone who learned x86 assembly language before learning to use Gas.) Nasm is freely available and extremely portable; see http://nasm.sourceforge.net/.

Please also note that if you aren't a little bit familiar with assembly code, you may find parts of this document sort of hard to follow.
Linux

Rip DVDs in Linux the (Semi-)Easy Way

Post date: December 8, 2007, 14:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 4229 Comments
Tutorial quote: With its hacker-friendly aesthetic and open source mentality, you'd think a Linux desktop would be the best place to assert your digital rights—you know, make backup copies of your DVDs, convert them for iPods, that kind of thing.

And you'd be half right. There are plenty of programs that let you take control of your video discs, but they're only useful if you can make it through a maze of configuration menus, command line options, choices about bit rates and codecs, and the occasional confusing message about a missing library.

I've tried out a good number of DVD ripping and conversion programs, and I've made peace with one method, and one program, that gets the job done more often than not. It's not exactly one-click, but once your system is set up, you can drop in DVDs and back them up or convert them with relative ease.

Note on system differences: I set up my ripping/burning system on a Lenovo Thinkpad T61 running a brand-new installation of Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon). As with so many things Linux, packages and commands may vary based on your system. But for the most part, the tools I use in this walkthrough work across distributions and on both major desktop environments, GNOME and KDE.
Linux

Installing and Using Hadoop

Post date: November 28, 2009, 22:11 Category: System Views: 5248 Comments
Tutorial quote: Learn to install configure and use the open source Hadoop framework from the Apache Foundation. Basic installation, configuration, executing jobs, and using the HDFS filesystem and the Web GUI.
Debian

Howto install pureftpd on a debian machine

Post date: April 10, 2006, 02:04 Category: Software Views: 3598 Comments
Tutorial quote: The target of this tutorial is to have a successful installation of the ftp-daemon pureftpd working with virtual user accounts. You should already know about installing pureftpd.
Ubuntu

MythTV w/PVR-150 Setup on Ubuntu Linux Breezy Badger (5.10)

Post date: December 16, 2005, 22:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 4373 Comments
Tutorial quote: Good how-to for installing MythTV on Ubuntu in 45 minutes.
Ubuntu

installing koha on ubuntu 9.04

Post date: March 17, 2010, 19:03 Category: Software Views: 4966 Comments
Tutorial quote: A tutorial on how to install KOHA, an open source library management software on ubuntu.
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