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Debian

Distributed Replicated Storage Across Four Nodes With GlusterFS On Debian Lenny

Post date: June 30, 2009, 11:06 Category: Installing Views: 4467 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Debian Lenny) to a distributed replicated storage with GlusterFS. Nodes 1 and 2 (replication1) as well as 3 and 4 (replication2) will mirror each other, and replication1 and replication2 will be combined to one larger storage server (distribution). Basically, this is RAID10 over network. If you lose one server from replication1 and one from replication2, the distributed volume continues to work. The client system (Debian Lenny as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86-64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.
FreeBSD

Using Software RAID-1 with FreeBSD

Post date: November 29, 2005, 03:11 Category: System Views: 4498 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you ever needed a software RAID solution for a low-end server install? Perhaps you've wanted your workstation to take advantage of the redundancy provided by a disk mirror without investing in a hardware RAID controller. Has a prior painful configuration experience turned you off software RAID altogether on Unix systems?


Since 5.3-Release, FreeBSD comes with gmirror(8), which allows you to easily configure a software RAID 1 solution. While tutorials on gmirror exist, I found them to require either manual calculations of partition sizes with bsdlabel or the use of a fix-it floppy on an existing system.

It made more sense to me to configure RAID during the install of the operating system. I also wanted a procedure that was easy to follow and didn't introduce human error in the form of a math miscalculation. After cobbling together the available documentation and experimenting my way through various configurations, I came across a procedure that has worked well for me on several different systems. I also received valuable feedback from Pawel Jakub Dawidek, the author of gmirror, who gave some insight into some of the not yet documented features of gmirror.
Ubuntu

How To Install VMware Server On A Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake) System

Post date: July 16, 2006, 16:07 Category: Software Views: 4038 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install the free VMware Server (version 1.0.0) on a Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake) system.

VMware has just released version 1.0.0 of its free VMware Server. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems ("virtual machines") such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. This has the benefit that you can run multiple operating systems on the same hardware which saves a lot of money, and you can move virtual machines from one VMware Server to the next one (or to a system that has the VMware Player which is also free). In this article we use Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake) as the host operating system.

I want to say first that this is not the only way of setting up such a system. There are many ways of achieving this goal but this is the way I take. I do not issue any guarantee that this will work for you!
Linux

Monitoring and Managing Linux Software RAID

Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: System Views: 3487 Comments
Tutorial quote: Systems administrators managing a data center face numerous challenges to achieve required availability and uptime. Two of the main challenges are shrinking budgets (for hardware, software, and staffing) and short deadlines in which to deliver solutions. The Linux community has developed kernel support for software RAID (Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks) to help meet those challenges. Software RAID, properly implemented, can eliminate system downtime caused by disk drive errors. The source code to the Linux kernel, the RAID modules, and the raidtools package are available at minimal cost under the GNU Public License. The interface is well documented and comprehensible to a moderately experienced Linux systems administrator.

In this article, I'll provide an overview of the software RAID implementation in the Linux 2.4.X kernel. I will describe the creation and activation of software RAID devices as well as the management of active RAID devices. Finally, I will discuss some procedures for recovering from a failed disk unit.
Unix+clones

Classic AmigaOS Emulation - A Guide for WinUAE

Post date: June 12, 2005, 23:06 Category: Emulation Views: 4545 Comments
Tutorial quote: WinUAE has reached a "v1.0 public"-state (!) and includes many improvements including OpenGL/DirectX display filters (for enhancing graphic output), Catweasel support (hardware for reading classic Amiga formatted diskettes with today's diskdrives) and an overall more cleanly designed user interface. For most people who are unfamiliar with AmigaOS and the use of Amiga emulators, setting up a usable AmigaOS emulation environment can be a daunting task. I have often heard of even veteran computing professionals feeling like complete computing newbees again when being confronted with all the Amiga jargon floating around on Amiga forums. With this article I intend to help provide information and pointers to resources for getting familiar with classic Amiga emulation while focussing on the freely available WinUAE emulator for the Windows platform. With this guide setting up an advanced classic emulation environment shoulld be possible for any PC user.

This article also includes many WinUAE screenshots, videos and information on acquiring and using freely available software.
Linux

Change your Network card MAC ( Media Access Control) address Using macchanger

Post date: January 4, 2007, 20:01 Category: Network Views: 3905 Comments
Tutorial quote: Media Access Control address, a hardware address that uniquely identifies each node of a network. In IEEE 802 networks, the Data Link Control (DLC) layer of the OSI Reference Model is divided into two sublayers: the Logical Link Control (LLC) layer and the Media Access Control (MAC) layer. The MAC layer interfaces directly with the network medium.Consequently, each different type of network medium requires a different MAC layer. On networks that do not conform to the IEEE 802 standards but do conform to the OSI Reference Model, the node address is called the Data Link Control (DLC) address.
Yellow+Dog

Installing Linux on the Mac mini

Post date: May 11, 2005, 12:05 Category: Installing Views: 7295 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Mac mini is an ideal low-cost, high-performance PowerPC development platform for numerous applications. Learn how to install and configure Linux on the mini. Future articles will add the software required to make it into a stand-alone multimedia appliance.

This short series of articles shows you how to take a conveniently inexpensive, high-end PowerPC® platform (specifically, an Apple Mac mini) and build it into a home multimedia appliance using Linux™. At the end of the series, you'll have a stand-alone device that can play slide shows of images, audio, and movies, and that is controlled and administered from another machine using a standard Web browser.

The PowerPC platform is very well-suited to this type of multimedia application, and the G4 with AltiVec used in the Mac mini is an exceptionally powerful and flexible choice. This first article introduces you to the hardware's capabilities and walks you through installing and configuring Yellow Dog Linux so you can delve into some application code in the next article.
Debian

Change your Network card MAC ( Media Access Control) address

Post date: December 4, 2007, 10:12 Category: Network Views: 3792 Comments
Tutorial quote: Media Access Control address, a hardware address that uniquely identifies each node of a network. In IEEE 802 networks, the Data Link Control (DLC) layer of the OSI Reference Model is divided into two sublayers: the Logical Link Control (LLC) layer and the Media Access Control (MAC) layer. The MAC layer interfaces directly with the network medium.Consequently, each different type of network medium requires a different MAC layer. On networks that do not conform to the IEEE 802 standards but do conform to the OSI Reference Model, the node address is called the Data Link Control (DLC) address.

If you want to change your network card mac address you need to use simple utility called mac changer.MAC changer is a utility for manipulating the MAC address of network interfaces
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